Skip to main content

Caste School of Race Relations

Caste School of Race Relations The label sometimes attached to those authors who applied the term caste to the separation between Whites and Blacks in the United States. The most notable publications in this mould are W. Lloyd Warner 's ‘American Caste and Class’ (American Journal of Sociology, 1936)
, Gunnar Myrdal 's An American Dilemma (1944)
, and John Dollard 's Caste and Class in a Southern Town (1937)
.

This interpretation of American race relations provoked a furious (though fairly short-lived) controversy. Myrdal defended his analysis by claiming that ‘the scientifically important difference between the terms “caste” and “class”… is … a relatively large difference in freedom of movement between groups’. He also disputed whether (as critics of the School tended to claim) the Hindu caste system was characterized by less fluidity and less conflict than relations between Whites and Blacks in the United States.

The most sustained criticism of the school is Oliver C. Cox's Caste, Class and Race (1948), in which the author points to a fundamental difference between the Indian and American situations, in that caste divisions in the former are a coherent system based on the principle of inequality, whereas the ‘colour bar’ in America actually contradicted the egalitariany principles of the system within which it occurred.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Caste School of Race Relations." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Caste School of Race Relations." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caste-school-race-relations

"Caste School of Race Relations." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Retrieved November 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/caste-school-race-relations

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.