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PERSON

PERSON. A grammatical and semantic category applying to PRONOUNS and VERBS and used in describing the roles of people and things.

Pronouns

In STANDARD ENGLISH, the first-person pronouns are the speakers(s) or writer(s) together with any others included in the plural (I, me, we, us). The second-person pronouns are the addressee(s) and possibly others in the plural (you and archaic singular thou/thee). The third person pronouns are others being referred to (she, her, he, him, it, one, they, them). MELANESIAN PIDGIN ENGLISH makes a further distinction by having two words to correspond to we, one including speaker, listener, and possibly others (yumi: you-me) and one excluding the listener (mipela, me-fellow: ‘me and someone else’). There can also be different words for you, implying greater or lesser degrees of intimacy or formality, as with French tu/vous, comparable to the archaic and dialectal English distinction thou/you. The distinctions of person are shown not only in PERSONAL PRONOUNS but also in reflexive pronouns (myself) and possessive pronouns (my, mine).

There is no necessary correspondence between the grammatical and semantic category of person. In SPANISH, the formal pronouns usted/ustedes (you, singular/plural) semantically address people but are grammatically third-person pronouns. Usted derives from an original vuestra merced (your grace), and parallels the highly formal convention in English in Does Madam wish to look at some other hats? (addressed to a customer). Comparable usages in present-day English are the royal and editorial we and the generalized you. This use of we is semantically singular while grammatically plural, as in Queen Victoria's remark, ‘We are not amused.’ The generalized you, as in You never can tell, can you?, is second person grammatically but semantically includes others. Usage is sometimes ambiguous between the addressed and generalized you, prompting the question Do you mean me or everybody? Generic or inclusive he is a long-established usage in which the third-person masculine represents both man and woman (Ask anybody and he'll give you the same answer). Those who defend its use argue that sexist bias is not present in it or intended by it, and that the meaning is clear. Those who object to it argue that it misrepresents half the human race and reinforces male bias and social dominance. See GENERIC PRONOUN. In colloquial usage, they is often used instead (Ask anybody and they'll give you the same answer).

Verbs

In highly inflected languages like Latin, person is indicated in the verb itself: amo I love, amas thou lovest, amat he/she/it loves, amamus we love, amatis you (plural) love, amant they love. As a result, pronouns are used for other purposes, such as emphasis. In English, however, only the third-person singular of the present tense normally has a distinct form: he loves, she likes, it does. See VOICE.

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"PERSON." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"PERSON." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/person

"PERSON." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/person

person

per·son / ˈpərsən/ • n. (pl. peo·ple / ˈpēpəl/ or per·sons ) 1. a human being regarded as an individual: the porter was the last person to see her she is a person of astonishing energy. ∎  used in legal or formal contexts to refer to an unspecified individual: the entrance fee is $10.00 per person. ∎  [in sing.] an individual characterized by a preference or liking for a specified thing: she's not a cat person. ∎  an individual's body: I have publicity photographs on my person at all times. ∎  a character in a play or story: his previous roles in the person of a fallible cop. 2. Gram. a category used in the classification of pronouns, possessive determiners, and verb forms, according to whether they indicate the speaker (first person) , the addressee (second person) , or a third party (third person) . 3. Christian Theol. each of the three modes of being of God, namely the Father, the Son, or the Holy Spirit, who together constitute the Trinity. PHRASES: be one's own person do or be what one wishes or in accordance with one's own character rather than as influenced by others. in person with the personal presence or action of the individual specified: he had to pick up his welfare check in person. in the person of in the physical form of: trouble arrived in the person of a short, mustached Berliner. ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French persone, from Latin persona ‘actor's mask, character in a play,’ later ‘human being.’

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"person." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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person

person †character, part played; human being XIII; living body of a human being; individual personality XIV; (theol.) distinction of being in the Godhead XIII; (gram.) XVI. — OF. persone (mod. personne) :— L. persōna mask used by a player, one who plays a part, character acted, etc.; perh. of Etruscan orig. The normally developed var. parson (XIV–XVII) has been differentiated with a special meaning; person is a reversion to L. form.
So personable having a well-formed person. XV. — F. †personnable. personage †image, effigy; body of a person XV; person of note; person in a drama XVI. — OF. personage (mod. personnage). personal XIV. — OF. personal, -el (mod. personnel) — L. persōnālis. personality XIV. — (O)F. — late L. personalty personal estate. XVI. — law F. personalté. personate act the part of, IMPERSONATE XVI; represent, typify XVII. f. pp. stem of late L. persōnāre. personify XVIII. — F. personnifier; hence personification XVIII. personnel XIX. — F., sb. use of personnel PERSONAL.

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"person." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"person." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/person-1

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Person

PERSON

In general usage, a human being; by statute, however, the term can include firms, labor organizations,partnerships, associations, corporations, legal representatives, trustees, trustees inbankruptcy, or receivers.

A corporation is a "person" for purposes of the constitutional guarantees of equal protection of laws and due process of law.

Foreign governments otherwise eligible to sue in United States courts are "persons" entitled to institute a suit for treble damages for alleged antitrust violations under the clayton act (15 U.S.C.A. § 12 et seq.).

Illegitimate children are "persons" within the meaning of the Equal Protection Clause of the fourteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The phrase interested person refers to heirs, devisees, children, spouses, creditors, beneficiaries, and any others having a property right in, or a claim against, a trust estate or the estate of a decedent, ward, or protected person. It also refers to personal representatives and to fiduciaries.

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"Person." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Person." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/person

person

person •Masson •flaxen, Jackson, klaxon, Sachsen, Saxon, waxen •Samson •Branson, Jansen, Manson, Nansen •arson, Carson, fasten, parson, sarsen •Bresson, delicatessen, Essen, lessen, lesson •Texan •Belsen, keelson, Nelson •Mendelssohn • Empson •Benson, ensign •Stetson •basin, caisson, chasten, diapason, hasten, Jason, mason •Bateson • handbasin • washbasin •Freemason • stonemason • Nielsen •Stevenson •christen, glisten, listen •Gibson, Ibsen •Blixen, Nixon, vixen •Nilsson, Stillson, Wilson •Nicholson • Simpson • Whitsun •Robinson • Acheson •Addison, Madison •Edison •Atkinson • Dickinson • Alison •Tennyson, venison •unison •caparison, comparison, garrison, Harrison •Ericsson • Morrison •archdiocesan, diocesan •jettison • Davisson •bison, Meissen, Tyson •Michelson • Robson •coxswain, oxen •Mommsen, Thompson •Johnson, Jonson, sponson, Swanson •Watson •coarsen, hoarsen, Orson •boatswain, bosun •Robeson • Jolson • moisten • loosen •Wolfson • Cookson • Hudson •Bunsen • tutsan •Grierson, Pearson •Culbertson • Richardson • Anderson •Jefferson • Ferguson • Rowlandson •Amundsen • Emerson • Jespersen •Saracen • Peterson • Williamson •person, worsen •Bergson • chairperson • layperson •salesperson • sportsperson •spokesperson

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"person." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"person." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/person