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Defeasible

DEFEASIBLE

Potentially subject to defeat, termination, orannulmentupon the occurrence of a future action or event, or the performance of a condition subsequent.

The most common legal application of the term is with respect to estates as interest in land, such as in the case of a conveyance or a life estate, which is defeasible upon the happening of a certain specified event, for example, the death of the person holding such an interest.

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"Defeasible." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Defeasible." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/defeasible

"Defeasible." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved November 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/defeasible

defeasible

de·fea·si·ble / diˈfēzəbəl/ • adj. chiefly Law Philos. open in principle to revision, valid objection, forfeiture, or annulment. DERIVATIVES: de·fea·si·bil·i·ty / -ˌfēzəˈbilitē/ n. de·fea·si·bly / -blē/ adv.

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"defeasible." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"defeasible." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defeasible

"defeasible." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defeasible