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chain

chain, flexible series of connected links used in various ways, especially for the transmission of motive power, for hoisting (see pulley), and for securing or fastening. Commonly, mechanical energy from a motor or other source applied to a sprocket wheel is conveyed by means of an endless chain to another sprocket wheel for driving a mechanism. Examples of such an arrangement are found in bicycles, motorcycles, and conveyor belts. The chain in this application is so designed that each consecutive link fits over a sprocket, the distance between links being called the pitch. The relative speed of the wheels varies according to their relative circumferences and, thus, the number of sprockets on each. There are several types of chain for the transmission of power. A detachable-link chain has links that are simple rectangles, each with a connecting hook at one end by which it is attached to the next link. A pintle chain has links that are approximately U-shaped. The closed end of each link fits into the open end of the next one; a pin holds the two links together. A block chain consists of metal blocks that are joined together by side plates and pins to form links. A roller chain has links consisting of side plates with hollow cylindrical rollers between them. Pins pass through the rollers and side plates to hold the links together. A silent, or inverted-tooth, chain has links made of toothed metal plates. A number of these links are placed side by side to form a group. Each group is joined to another one by meshing the ends of the links of both groups and inserting a pin there. By repeating the process a chain can be formed. Its width can be varied by varying the number of links in a group. Although not completely silent, this type of chain is quieter than other power transmission chains. The coil chains used in hoists and for locking or fastening purposes are of the open-link type, comprising solid interlocked rings, or of the stud-link type, in which a stud, or bar, across the link keeps the chain from kinking.

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"chain." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/chain

"chain." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/chain

chain

chain / chān/ • n. 1. a connected flexible series of metal links used for fastening or securing objects and pulling or supporting loads. ∎  (chains) such a series of links, or a set of them, used to confine a prisoner: kept in chains. ∎  such a series of links worn as a decoration; a necklace. ∎ chiefly Brit. such a series of links worn as a badge of office. ∎  (chains) fig. a force or factor that binds or restricts someone: the chains of illness. ∎  (chains) short for snow chains. 2. a sequence of items of the same type forming a line: he kept the chain of buckets supplied with water. ∎  a sequence or series of connected elements: a chain of events. ∎  a group of establishments, such as hotels, stores, or restaurants, owned by the same company: the nation's largest hotel chain. ∎  a range of mountains. ∎  a part of a molecule consisting of a number of atoms (typically carbon) bonded together in a linear sequence. ∎  a figure in a quadrille or similar dance, in which dancers meet and pass each other in a continuous sequence. 3. a jointed measuring line consisting of linked metal rods. ∎  the length of such a measuring line (66 ft.). ∎  Football a measuring chain of ten yards, used in the determination of first downs. 4. (chains) a structure of planks projecting horizontally from a sailing ship's sides abreast of the masts, used to widen the basis for the shrouds. [ORIGIN: formed earlier of iron plates.] • v. [tr.] fasten or secure with a chain: she chained her bicycle to the railing. ∎  confine with a chain: he had been chained up | fig. as an actuary you will not be chained to a desk.

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"chain." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-1

"chain." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-1

chain

chain1 a series of linked metal rings for fastening or securing something. From the later sense of a jointed measuring line consisting of linked metal rods, chain is also used as a unit of measure for the length of such a measuring line (66 ft).
a chain is no stronger than its weakest link proverbial saying, mid 19th century, often used when identifying a particular point of vulnerability. (In 2000, the popular television game-show The Weakest Link was introduced, turning on the identification and expulsion of the member of a group seen to contribute least; the show's catchphrase is ‘You are the weakest link…goodbye.’)

See also ball and chain.

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"chain." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

"chain." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

chain

chain.
1. Romanesque moulding carved to resemble a chain.

2. Piece of timber or metal built into a brick wall to increase its stability and cohesion, called chain-bond.

3. Bond course of stone with one or more cramps connecting each pair of stones.

4. Complete circlet formed of a chain, used to prevent a circular work of masonry from spreading, e.g. in the dome of St Paul's Cathedral, London (begun 1675).

5. Chain-tie used to connect the heads of piers, etc., while vaults and arches are constructed.

6. If used to tie in bulging brickwork, an anchor is fixed to the end of the chain or rod, visible on the outside of the wall.

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"chain." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

"chain." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

Chain

Chain

a series of things linked together into a chain, actually or figuratively. See also catena, cordon, series.

Examples: chain of buckets; of causes, 1829; of charity, 1377; of deductions, 1664; of discourse, 1651; of events; of human beings; of ideas; of islands; of lakes; of mountains; of proof; of reasoning, 1809; of shops or supermarkets; of spangles, 1841; of storms; of succession, 1655; of thought, 1711.

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"Chain." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Chain." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0

"Chain." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0

chain

chain An imperial measure, equal to 22 yards (20.11 m), that was a unit of length formerly used by foresters and land surveyors (10 sq. chains = 1 acre).

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"chain." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

"chain." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

chain

chain An imperial measure, equal to 22 yards (20.11 m), that was a unit of length formerly used by foresters (10 sq. chains = 1 acre).

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"chain." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0

"chain." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0

chain

chain sb. XIII. — OF. chaine (mod. chaîne) :- L. catēna.
Hence, or — (O)F., chain vb. XIV.

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"chain." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-2

"chain." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-2

chain

chain
1. A singly linked linear list.

2. See directed set.

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"chain." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

"chain." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain

chain

chainabstain, appertain, arcane, arraign, ascertain, attain, Bahrain, bane, blain, brain, Braine, Cain, Caine, campaign, cane, chain, champagne, champaign, Champlain, Charmaine, chicane, chow mein, cocaine, Coleraine, Coltrane, complain, constrain, contain, crane, Dane, deign, demesne, demi-mondaine, detain, disdain, domain, domaine, drain, Duane, Dwane, Elaine, entertain, entrain, explain, fain, fane, feign, gain, Germaine, germane, grain, humane, Hussein, inane, Jain, Jane, Jermaine, Kane, La Fontaine, lain, lane, legerdemain, Lorraine, main, Maine, maintain, mane, mise en scène, Montaigne, moraine, mundane, obtain, ordain, pain, Paine, pane, pertain, plain, plane, Port-of-Spain, profane, rain, Raine, refrain, reign, rein, retain, romaine, sane, Seine, Shane, Sinn Fein, skein, slain, Spain, Spillane, sprain, stain, strain, sustain, swain, terrain, thane, train, twain, Ujjain, Ukraine, underlain, urbane, vain, vane, vein, Verlaine, vicereine, wain, wane, Wayne •watch chain • mondaine • Haldane •ultramundane • Cellophane •novocaine • sugar cane • marocain

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"chain." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chain." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0

"chain." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chain-0