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anchor

anchor, device cast overboard to secure a ship, boat, or other floating object by means of weight, friction, or hooks called flukes. In ancient times an anchor was often merely a large stone, a bag or basket of stones, a bag of sand, or, as with the Egyptians, a lead-weighted log. The Greeks are credited with the first use of iron anchors, while the Romans had metal devices with arms similar to modern anchors. The ordinary modern anchor consists of a shank (the stem, at the top of which is the anchor ring), a stock (the crosspiece at the top of the shank, either fixed or removable), a crown (the bottom portion), and arms, attached near the base of the shank at a right angle to the stock and curving upward to end in flat, triangular flukes. Other types of anchors include the patent anchor, which has either no stock at all or a stock lying in the same plane as the arms; the stream, or stern anchor, lighter than the regular anchor and used in narrow or congested waters where there is no room for the vessel to swing with the tide; and the grapnel, a small four-armed anchor used to recover lost objects. A sea anchor is a wooden or metal framework covered with canvas and weighted at the bottom; it is a temporary device used by disabled ships. Modern ships have several anchors; usually there are two forward and two aft. Formerly made of wrought iron, anchors are now usually made of forged steel.

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"anchor." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"anchor." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anchor

anchor

an·chor / ˈangkər/ • n. 1. a heavy object attached to a rope or chain and used to moor a vessel to the sea bottom, typically one having a metal shank with a ring at one end for the rope and a pair of curved and/or barbed flukes at the other. ∎ fig. a person or thing that provides stability or confidence in an otherwise uncertain situation: the European Community is the economic anchor of the New Europe. ∎  (in full anchor store) a store, e.g., a department store, that is the principal tenant of a mall or a shopping center. 2. an anchorman or anchorwoman, esp. in broadcasting or athletics. • v. [tr.] 1. moor (a ship) to the sea bottom with an anchor: the ship was anchored in the lee of the island| [intr.] we anchored in the harbor. ∎  secure firmly in position: with cords and pitons they anchored him to the rock. ∎  provide with a firm basis or foundation: it is important that policy be anchored to some acceptable theoretical basis. 2. to act or serve as an anchor for (a news program or sporting event). PHRASES: at anchor (of a ship) moored by means of an anchor. drop anchor (of a ship) let down the anchor and moor. weigh (or raise or heave) anchor (of a ship) take up the anchor when ready to depart.

anchor

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"anchor." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anchor." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anchor-1

"anchor." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anchor-1

anchor

anchor
1. Rock anchors are long bolts or cables with one end grouted into a drill hole and with a plate and nut on the exposed end. These can carry considerable loads, although slow failure of the rock will lessen the support.

2. Soil anchors may be used in sediments where the material is strong enough to provide sufficient reaction to the load. Holes must be drilled and the anchor installed and grouted quickly, as soil around the hole may crumble and reduce the strength of the bond.

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"anchor." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"anchor." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anchor

anchor

anchor.
1. Misnomer for the arrow-head, dart, or tongue-like ornament alternating with the egg-like form enriching e.g. the ovolo moulding or the echinus of the Ionic capital.

2. Exposed head of a metal tie or anchor-beam preventing the bulging of walls, often associated with a circular plate, or S-, X-, or Y-shapes on the external face of the wall.

3. Attribute of Hope, later of Hope.

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"anchor." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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anchor

anchor figuratively, a source of security and confidence. An anchor in Christian tradition is a symbol of hope, from a passage in Hebrews 6:19; it is also the emblem of St Clement, who was martyred by being thrown into the sea with an anchor round his neck.
weigh anchor (of a ship) take up the anchor when ready to start sailing.

See also foul anchor.

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"anchor." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anchor." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anchor

"anchor." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anchor

anchor

anchor appliance for mooring a vessel to the bottom. OE. ancor, -er, ancra — L. anc(h)ora — Gr. ágkūra; cf. late OHG., G. anker, ON. akkeri. Reinforced in ME. by (O)F. ancre.
So anchor vb. XIII. — (O)F. ancrer or medL. anc(h)orāre. Hence anchorage XVI, after F. ancrage.

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"anchor." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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anchor

anchoralpaca, attacker, backer, clacker, claqueur, cracker, Dhaka, hacker, Hakka, knacker, lacquer, maraca, paca, packer, sifaka, slacker, smacker, stacker, tacker, tracker, whacker, yakka •Kafka •anchor, banker, Bianca, canker, Casablanca, Costa Blanca, flanker, franker, hanker, lingua franca, Lubyanka, rancour (US rancor), ranker, Salamanca, spanker, Sri Lanka, tanka, tanker, up-anchor, wanker •Alaska, lascar, Madagascar, Nebraska •Kamchatka • linebacker • outbacker •hijacker, skyjacker •Schumacher • backpacker •safecracker • wisecracker •nutcracker • firecracker • ransacker •scrimshanker • bushwhacker •barker, haka, Kabaka, Lusaka, marker, moussaka, nosy parker, Oaxaca, Osaka, parka, Shaka, Zarqa •asker, masker •backmarker • waymarker •Becker, checker, Cheka, chequer, Dekker, exchequer, Flecker, mecca, Neckar, Necker, pecker, Quebecker, Rebecca, Rijeka, trekker, weka, wrecker •sepulchre (US sepulcher) • Cuenca •burlesquer, Francesca, Wesker •woodpecker

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"anchor." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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