Skip to main content
Select Source:

roll

roll / rōl/ • v. 1. move or cause to move in a particular direction by turning over and over on an axis: [intr.] the car rolled down into a ditch | [tr.] she rolled the ball across the floor. ∎  turn or cause to turn over to face a different direction: [no , ] she rolled on to her side | [tr.] they rolled him over on to his back. ∎  [tr.] turn (one's eyes) upward, typically to show surprise or disapproval: Sarah rolled her eyes. ∎  [tr.] make (something cylindrical) revolve between two surfaces: Plummer rolled the glass between his hands. ∎  [intr.] (of a person or animal) lie down and turn over and over while remaining in the same place: the buffalo rolled in the dust. ∎  [intr.] (of a moving ship, aircraft, or vehicle) rock or oscillate around an axis parallel to the direction of motion: the ship pitched and rolled. ∎  [intr.] move along or from side to side unsteadily or uncontrollably: they were rolling about with laughter. ∎  [tr.] inf. overturn (a vehicle): he rolled his Mercedes in a 100 mph crash. ∎  [tr.] throw (a die or dice). ∎  [tr.] obtain (a particular score) by doing this: roll a 2, 3, or 12. 2. [intr.] (of a vehicle) move or run on wheels: the van was rolling along the highway. ∎  [tr.] move or push (a wheeled object): Pat rolled the cart back and forth. ∎  (roll something up/down) make a car window or a window blind move up or down. ∎  (of time) elapse steadily: the years rolled by. ∎  (of a drop of liquid) flow: huge tears rolled down her cheeks. ∎  (roll off) (of a product) issue from (an assembly line or machine): the first copies of the newspaper rolled off the presses. ∎  (of waves, smoke, cloud, or fog) move or flow forward with an undulating motion: the fog rolled across the fields. ∎  [intr.] [usu. as adj.] (rolling) (of land) extend in gentle undulations: the rolling countryside. ∎  [intr.] (of credits for a movie or television program) be displayed as if moving on a roller up the screen. ∎  [intr.] (of a machine, esp. a camera) operate or begin operating: the cameras started to roll. ∎  [tr.] cause (a machine, esp. a camera) to begin operating: roll the camera. 3. [tr.] turn (something flexible) over and over on itself to form a cylinder, tube, or ball: she started to roll up her sleeping bag. ∎  [tr.] make by forming material into a cylinder or ball: Harry rolled himself a joint. ∎  [intr.] (of a person or animal) curl up tightly: the shock made the armadillo roll into a ball. 4. [tr.] flatten (something) by passing a roller over it or by passing it between rollers: roll out the dough on a floured surface. 5. [intr.] (of a loud, deep sound such as that of thunder or drums) reverberate: the first peals of thunder rolled across the sky. ∎  [tr.] pronounce (a consonant, typically an r) with a trill: when he wanted to emphasize a point he rolled his rrrs. ∎  [tr.] utter (a word or words) with a reverberating or vibratory effect: he rolled the word around his mouth. ∎  (of words) flow effortlessly or mellifluously: the names of his colleagues rolled off his lips. 6. inf. rob (someone, typically when they are intoxicated or asleep): if you don't get drunk, you don't get rolled. • n. 1. a cylinder formed by winding flexible material around a tube or by turning it over and over on itself without folding: a roll of carpet. ∎  a cylindrical mass of something or a number of items arranged in a cylindrical shape: a roll of mints. ∎  an item of food that is made by wrapping a flat sheet of pastry, cake, meat, or fish around a sweet or savory filling: salmon and rice rolls. ∎  money, typically a quantity of banknotes rolled together. ∎  a roller for flattening something, esp. one used to shape metal in a rolling mill. 2. a movement in which someone or something turns or is turned over on itself: a roll of the dice the ponies completed two rolls before getting back on their feet. ∎  a gymnastic exercise in which the body is rolled into a tucked position and turned in a forward or backward circle: a forward roll. ∎  a swaying or oscillation of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle around an axis parallel to the direction of motion: the car corners capably with a minimum of roll. ∎  undulation of the landscape: hidden by the roll of the land was a refinery. 3. a prolonged, deep, reverberating sound, typically made by thunder or a drum: thunder exploded, roll after roll. ∎  Mus. one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a sustained, rapid alternation of single or double strokes of each stick. 4. a very small loaf of bread, typically eaten with butter or a filling: a sausage roll. 5. an official list or register of names. ∎  the total numbers on such a list: a review of secondary schools to assess the effects of falling rolls. ∎  a document, typically an official record, in scroll form. PHRASES: a roll in the hay (or the sack) inf. an act of sexual intercourse. be rolling (in money) inf. be very rich. on a roll inf. experiencing a prolonged spell of success or good luck: the organization is on a roll. rolled into one (of characteristics drawn from different people or things) combined in one person or thing: banks are several businesses rolled into one. rolling in the aisles inf. (of an audience) laughing uncontrollably. roll of honor a list of people whose deeds or achievements are honored. ∎  a list of those who have died in battle. roll of the dice see dice. roll one's own inf. make one's own cigarettes from loose tobacco. roll up one's sleeves prepare to fight or work. roll with the punches (of a boxer) move one's body away from an opponent's blows so as to lessen the impact. ∎ fig. adapt oneself to adverse circumstances. PHRASAL VERBS: roll something back reverse the progress or reduce the power or importance of something: the strategy to roll back communism. roll in inf. be received in large amounts: the money was rolling in. ∎  arrive at a place in a casual way, typically in spite of being late: Steve rolled in about lunchtime. roll something on apply something with a roller: roll on a decorative paint finish. roll something out officially launch or unveil a new product or service: the firm rolled out its newest generation of supercomputers. roll something over Finance contrive or extend a particular financial arrangement: this is not a good time for rolling over corporate debt. roll up inf. arrive in a vehicle: we rolled up at the same time. ∎ inf. roll a cigarette, esp. a cannabis cigarette. roll something up Mil. drive the flank of an enemy line back and round so that the line is shortened or surrounded.DERIVATIVES: roll·a·ble adj. ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French rolle (noun), roller (verb), from Latin rotulus ‘a roll,’ variant of rotula ‘little wheel,’ diminutive of rota.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-1

"roll." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-1

Roll

ROLL

To commit arobberyby force. A record of the proceedings of a court or public office.

In some states, a judgment roll is required to be filed by the clerk of the court when he or she enters judgment. It normally contains the summons, pleadings, admissions, and each judgment and order involving the merits of the case or affecting the final judgment. In the federal courts and most state courts, judgments are recorded in the civil docket or criminal docket.

In old English practice, a judgment roll was a roll of parchment containing the entries of the proceedings in an action at law including the entry of judgment. It was filed in the treasury of the court.

A tax roll is a list of the persons and property subject to the payment of a particular tax, with the amounts due; it is compiled and verified in proper form to enable the collecting officers to enforce the tax.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Roll." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Roll." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/roll

"Roll." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/roll

roll

roll roll something back reverse the progress or reduce the power or importance of something.
roll something out officially launch or unveil a new product or service.
roll with the punches adapt oneself to adverse circumstances; the idea is of a boxer moving their body away from an opponent's blows so as to lessen the impact.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

"roll." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

roll

roll2 turn or cause to turn over and over as on an axis or in a socket XIV; coil or cause to coil into a mass; make a reverberating noise XVI. — OF. rol(l)er, (also mod.) rouler :- Rom. *rotulāre, f. L. rotulus ROLL1.
Hence sb. act of rolling. XVII. roller1 (-ER1) cylindrical object, as of wood, metal, etc. XV.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-5

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-5

roll

roll1 piece of parchment, etc. made into cylindrical form XIII; such a piece inscribed with formal records, register XIV; quantity of material, mechanical object in cylindrical form, etc. XVI. — OF. ro(u)lle (mod. rôle):- L. rotulus, var. of rotula, dim. of rota wheel.
Hence roll-call XIX.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-4

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-4

roll

roll.
1. Bowtell or common nearly cylindrical moulding, semicircular or more than semicircular in section.

2. Rounded piece of wood along a ridge or hip over which metal is dressed as a ridge-cap.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

"roll." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

Roll

Roll

a succession of sounds.

Examples : roll of drums (drum beats), 1842; of language, 1858; of thunder, 1818; of breaking waves, 1889.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Roll." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Roll." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-0

"Roll." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-0

roll

roll (Ger. Wirbel). Rapid succession of notes on a drum, becoming almost a continuous sound.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

"roll." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll

roll

roll, in aviation: see airfoil.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/roll

"roll." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/roll

roll

rollbarcarole, bole, bowl, cajole, coal, Cole, condole, console, control, dhole, dole, droll, enrol (US enroll), extol, foal, goal, hole, Joel, knoll, kohl, mol, mole, Nicole, parol, parole, patrol, pole, poll, prole, rôle, roll, scroll, Seoul, shoal, skoal, sole, soul, stole, stroll, thole, Tirol, toad-in-the-hole, toll, troll, vole, whole •Creole •carriole, dariole •cabriole • capriole •aureole, gloriole, oriole •wassail-bowl • fishbowl • dustbowl •punchbowl • rocambole • farandole •girandole • manhole • rathole •armhole • arsehole • hellhole •keyhole, kneehole •peephole •sinkhole • pinhole • cubbyhole •hidey-hole • pigeonhole •eyehole, spyhole •foxhole •knothole, pothole •borehole, Warhol •porthole • soundhole • blowhole •stokehole • bolthole • loophole •lughole, plughole •chuckhole • buttonhole • bunghole •earhole • waterhole • wormhole •charcoal • caracole • Seminole •pinole

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"roll." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"roll." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-0

"roll." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/roll-0