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drone

drone or remotely piloted vehicle, a pilotless craft guided by remote control. Aircraft, ships, and land vehicles can be designed or outfitted as drones, although underwater vessels—both piloted and pilotless—are usually called submersibles. Small, relatively inexpensive military drones are used as targets in combat practice, while high-performance models may be used in hazardous reconnaissance missions and to carry and launch missiles against enemy targets without exposing pilots and their far more expensive aircraft to antiaircraft fire. Depending on the mission, drones can be equipped with armament, radar, video cameras, lasers, or sensors for chemical or biological weapons; drones typically can stay aloft without refueling for much longer periods of time than piloted airplanes. Guidance of the drone can originate from an airplane, a ship, a ground station, or a satellite link; a satellite link enables a drone to be guided by an operator stationed thousands of miles away. Building upon the successful use of drones in the Second Persian Gulf War and in Afghanistan, the Homeland Security Department adopted unmanned aircraft to track drug smugglers, illegal immigrants, and terrorists along the U.S. borders. In the United States and elsewhere, drones are increasingly used by law enforcement and security agencies. Current and contemplated non-policing uses include monitoring crops, helping fight forest fires, atmospheric and wildlife research, filmmaking, and news reporting. The Federal Aviation Administration is developing (by the end of 2015) operational and safety regulations governing the commercial use of drone.

Early attempts to use unmanned aerial vehicles are documented as early as the U.S. Civil War. Both Union and Confederate troops launched balloons loaded with explosives in the hope that the balloons would come down inside ammunition or supply depots and explode, but the balloons were at the mercy of the prevailing winds and proved largely ineffective. Toward the end of World War II the Japanese launched similarly ineffective high-altitude balloons loaded with incendiary and other explosives in the hope that winds would carry them to the United States, where they would start forest fires. A U.S. project at about the same time, called "Operation Aphrodite," involved using a modified manned aircraft as a cruise missile. The pilot would take off, get the plane to altitude, pass control to a manned aircraft through a radio link, and then bail out. The somewhat more successful German V-1 was essentially an early cruise missile, not a remote-controlled drone. By the Vietnam War the technology to launch and control drones had evolved. Initially, pilotless aircraft equipped with video cameras flew over North Vietnam to provide reconnaissance data; drones were later used to drop leaflets, interfere with electronic communications, and locate surface-to-air missile batteries. By the early 21st cent., small, hand-launched drones were used by U.S. ground forces to scout otherwise obscured areas, and very small bird- and insectlike drones were under experimental development.

See study by N. Friedman (2010).

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"drone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/drone

"drone." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/drone

drone

drone / drōn/ • v. [intr.] make a continuous low humming sound: in the far distance a machine droned. ∎  speak tediously in a dull monotonous tone: he reached for another beer while Jim droned on. ∎  move with a continuous humming sound: traffic droned up and down the street. • n. 1. a low continuous humming sound: he nodded off to the drone of the car engine. ∎ inf. a monotonous speech: only twenty minutes of the hour-long drone had passed. ∎  a continuous musical note, typically of low pitch. ∎  a musical instrument, or part of one, sounding such a continuous note, in particular (also drone pipe) a pipe in a bagpipe or (also drone string) a string in an instrument such as a hurdy-gurdy or a sitar. 2. a male bee in a colony of social bees, which does no work but can fertilize a queen. ∎ fig. a person who does no useful work and lives off others. 3. a remote-controlled pilotless aircraft or missile.

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"drone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-1

"drone." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-1

drone

drone male of the honey-bee. OE. drā́n, drǣ́n; corr. to OS. drān, dreno, MLG. drāne, drōne, (with e-grade) OHG. treno (MHG. tren(e), G. dial. träne), prob. f. *dran- *dren *drun- boom (cf. MDu. drōnen, Du. dreunen, LG. drönen, Icel. drynja roar), with which Gr. anthrḗnē wild bee, tenthrēnē kind of wasp, have been connected. The Eng. form drone (XV; cf. ME., mod. dial. drane) is perh. — (M)LG. drōne. Cf. drone hum, buzz (sb. and vb.). XVI.

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"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-2

"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-2

drone

drone a male bee in a colony of social bees, which does no work but can fertilize a queen; in figurative usage (from the early 16th century), a person who does no useful work and lives off others.

In the stories of P. G. Wodehouse, the Drones Club was the club frequented by Bertie Wooster and his friends.

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"drone." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

"drone." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

drone

drone A fertile male in a colony of social bees, especially the honeybee (Apis mellifera). The drones die after mating with the queen bee as the male reproductive organs explode within the female.

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"drone." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-1

"drone." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-1

drone

drone The male of ants, bees, and wasps, whose only function is to mate with fertile females: the drone contributes nothing to the maintenance of the colony.

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"drone." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

"drone." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

drone

drone The male of ants, bees, and wasps, whose only function is to mate with fertile females: the drone contributes nothing to the maintenance of the colony.

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"drone." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-0

"drone." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-0

drone

drone. Pipe or pipes sounding continuous note of fixed pitch as a permanent bass, e.g. of bagpipes. Hence drone bass applied to orch. mus.

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"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

"drone." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone

drone

dronealone, atone, Beaune, bemoan, blown, bone, Capone, clone, Cohn, Cologne, condone, cone, co-own, crone, drone, enthrone, flown, foreknown, foreshown, groan, grown, half-tone, home-grown, hone, Joan, known, leone, loan, lone, moan, Mon, mown, ochone, outflown, outgrown, own, phone, pone, prone, Rhône, roan, rone, sewn, shown, Simone, Sloane, Soane, sone, sown, stone, strown, throne, thrown, tone, trombone, Tyrone, unbeknown, undersown, zone •Dione • backbone • hambone •breastbone • aitchbone •tail bone, whalebone •cheekbone • shin bone • hip bone •wishbone • splint bone • herringbone •thigh bone • jawbone • marrowbone •knuckle bone • collarbone •methadone • headphone • cellphone •heckelphone • payphone • Freefone •radio-telephone, telephone •videophone • francophone •megaphone • speakerphone •allophone • Anglophone • xylophone •gramophone • homophone •vibraphone • microphone •saxophone • answerphone •dictaphone •sarrusophone, sousaphone •silicone • pine cone • snow cone •flyblown • cyclone • violone •hormone • pheromone • Oenone •chaperone • progesterone •testosterone

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"drone." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"drone." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/drone-0