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torque

torque, in physics, that which tends to change the rate of rotation of a body; also called the moment of force. The torque produced by rotating parts of an electric motor or internal-combustion engine is often used as a measure of its ability to do useful work. The magnitude of the torque acting on a body is equal to the product of the force acting on the body and the distance from its point of application to the axis around which the body is free to rotate. Only the component of the force lying in the plane of rotation and perpendicular to the radius from the axis of rotation to the point of application contributes to the torque. This radius is called the moment arm, or lever arm. The net torque acting on a body is always equal to the product of the body's moment of inertia about its axis of rotation and its observed angular acceleration. If a body undergoes no angular acceleration, there is no net torque acting on it. Units of torque are units of force multiplied by units of distance, e.g., newton-meters, dyne-centimeters, and foot-pounds (or pound-feet).

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"torque." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"torque." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/torque

"torque." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/torque

torque

torque Turning effect of a force. A turbine produces a torque on its rotating shaft to turn a generator. The output of a rotary engine, such as the familiar four-stroke engine or an electric motor, is rated by the torque it can develop. A measurement is made by multiplying the force by its perpendicular distance from the turning point. The unit of measurement is the newton metre (Nm).

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"torque." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"torque." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/torque

"torque." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/torque

torque

torque / tôrk/ • n. 1. Mechanics a twisting force that tends to cause rotation. 2. variant spelling of torc. • v. [tr.] apply torque or a twisting force to (an object): he gently torqued the hip joint. DERIVATIVES: tor·quey adj.

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"torque." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"torque." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque-0

"torque." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque-0

torque

torque necklace, twisted band. XIX. — F. — L. torquēs, f. torquēre twist.

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"torque." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"torque." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque-1

"torque." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque-1

Torque

Torque

of mechanicsLipton, 1970.

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"Torque." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Torque." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque

"Torque." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque

torque

torqueauk, baulk, Bork, caulk (US calk), chalk, cork, dork, Dundalk, Falk, fork, gawk, hawk, Hawke, nork, orc, outwalk, pork, squawk, stalk, stork, talk, torc, torque, walk, york •pitchfork • nighthawk • goshawk •mohawk • sparrowhawk • tomahawk •back talk • peptalk • beanstalk •sweet-talk • crosstalk • small talk •smooth-talk • catwalk • jaywalk •cakewalk • space walk •sheep walk, sleepwalk •skywalk • sidewalk • crosswalk •boardwalk • rope-walk

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"torque." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"torque." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque

"torque." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/torque