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force

force / fôrs/ • n. 1. strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement: he was thrown backward by the force of the explosion. ∎  Physics an influence tending to change the motion of a body or produce motion or stress in a stationary body. The magnitude of such an influence is often calculated by multiplying the mass of the body by its acceleration. ∎  a person or thing regarded as exerting power or influence: he might still be a force for peace and unity. ∎  [in comb.] used with a number as a measure of wind strength on the Beaufort scale: a force-nine gale. 2. coercion or compulsion, esp. with the use or threat of violence: they ruled by law and not by force. 3. mental or moral strength or power: the force of popular opinion. ∎  the state of being in effect or valid: the law came into force in January. ∎  the powerful effect of something: the force of her writing is undiminished. 4. an organized body of military personnel or police: a soldier in a UN peacekeeping force. ∎  (forces) troops and weaponry: concealment from enemy forces | fig. a battle between the forces of good and evil. ∎  a group of people brought together and organized for a particular activity: a sales force. ∎  (the force) inf. a police department. 5. Baseball a force out. ∎  a situation in which a force out is possible. • v. [tr.] 1. make a way through or into by physical strength; break open by force: they broke into Fred's house and forced every cupboard door with ax or crowbar. ∎  [tr.] drive or push into a specified position or state using physical strength or against resistance: she forced her feet into flat leather sandals| fig. Fields was forced out as director. ∎  achieve or bring about (something) by coercion or effort: Sabine forced a smile she forced her way up the ladder. ∎  push or strain (something) to the utmost: she knew if she forced it she would rip it. ∎  artificially hasten the development or maturity of (a plant). 2. (often be forced) make (someone) do something against their will: she was forced into early retirement | [tr.] the universities were forced to cut staff. ∎  rape (a woman). ∎  Baseball put out (a runner) , or cause (a runner) to be put out, at the base to which they are advancing when they are forced to run on a batted ball: I was forced at second base as the first half of a double play. ∎  (in cards) make a play or bid that compels another player to make (a particular response); make a play or bid that compels (another player) to make such a response: East could force declarer to ruff another spade PHRASES: by force of by means of: exercising authority by force of arms. force the bidding (at an auction) make bids to raise the price rapidly. force someone's hand make someone do something: the exchange markets may force the Fed's hand. force the issue compel the making of an immediate decision. force the pace adopt a fast pace in a race in order to tire out one's opponents quickly. in force 1. in great strength or numbers: birdwatchers were out in force. 2. in effect; valid: the U.S. has over $8 trillion worth of life insurance in force. PHRASAL VERBS: force something down 1. manage to swallow food or drink when one does not want to: I forced down a slice of toast. 2. compel an aircraft to land: the plane might have been forced down by fighters. force oneself on/upon rape (a woman). force something on/upon impose or press something on (a person or organization): economic cutbacks were forced on the government.DERIVATIVES: force·a·ble adj. forc·er n. ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French force (noun), forcer (verb), based on Latin fortis ‘strong.’

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"force." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"force." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/force-0

"force." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/force-0

force

force, commonly, a "push" or "pull," more properly defined in physics as a quantity that changes the motion, size, or shape of a body. Force is a vector quantity, having both magnitude and direction. The magnitude of a force is measured in units such as the pound, dyne, and newton, depending upon the system of measurement being used. An unbalanced force acting on a body free to move will change the motion of the body. The quantity of motion of a body is measured by its momentum, the product of its mass and its velocity. According to Newton's second law of motion (see motion), the change in momentum is directly proportional to the applied force. Since mass is constant at ordinary velocities, the result of the force is a change in velocity, or an acceleration, which may be a change either in the speed or in the direction of the velocity.

Two or more forces acting on a body in different directions may balance, producing a state of equilibrium. For example, the downward force of gravity (see gravitation) on a person weighing 200 lb (91 km) when standing on the ground is balanced by an equivalent upward force exerted by the earth on the person's feet. If the person were to fall into a deep hole, then the upward force would no longer be acting and the person would be accelerated downward by the unbalanced force of gravity. If a body is not completely rigid, then a force acting on it may change its size or shape. Scientists study the strength of materials to anticipate how a given material may behave under the influence of various types of force.

There are four basic types of force in nature. Two of these are easily observed; the other two are detectable only at the atomic level. Although the weakest of the four forces is the gravitational force, it is the most easily observed because it affects all matter, is always attractive and because its range is theoretically infinite, i.e., the force decreases with distance but remains measurable at the largest separations. Thus, a very large mass, such as the sun, can exert over a distance of many millions of miles a force sufficient to keep a planet in orbit. The electromagnetic force, which can be observed between electric charges, is stronger than the gravitational force and also has infinite range. Both electric and magnetic forces are ultimately based on the electrical properties of matter; they are propagated together through space as an electromagnetic field of force (see electromagnetic radiation). At the atomic level, two additional types of force exist, both having extremely short range. The strong nuclear force, or strong interaction, is associated with certain reactions between elementary particles and is responsible for holding the atomic nucleus together. The weak nuclear force, or weak interaction, is associated with beta particle emission and particle decay; it is weaker than the electromagnetic force but stronger than the gravitational force.

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"force." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"force." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/force

"force." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/force

Force

FORCE

Power, violence, compulsion, or constraint exerted upon or against a person or thing. Power dynamically considered, that is, in motion or in action; constraining power, compulsion; strength directed to an end. Commonly the word occurs in such connections as to show that unlawful or wrongful action is meant, e.g., forcible entry.

Power statically considered, that is, at rest, or latent, but capable of being called into activity upon occasion for its exercise. Efficacy; legal validity. This is the meaning when we say that a statute or a contract is in force.

Reasonable force is that degree of force that is appropriate and not inordinate in defending one's person or property. A person who employs such force is justified in doing so and is neither criminally liable nor civilly liable in tort for the conduct.

deadly force is utilized when a person intends to cause death or serious bodily harm or when he or she recognizes personal involvement in the creation of a substantial risk that death or bodily harm will occur.

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"Force." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Force." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/force

force

force Push, pull, or turn. A force acting on an object may: (1) balance an equal but opposite force or a combination of forces so that it does not move, (2) change the state of motion of the object (in magnitude or direction), or (3) change the shape or state of the object. There are four fundamental forces: gravitation, electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force and strong nuclear force.

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"force." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"force." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/force

"force." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/force

force

force strength, power XIII; body of armed men XIV. — (O)F. :- Rom. *fortia, f. L. fortis strong.
So vb. XIII. forcible done by force XV; †strong; producing a powerful effect XVI.

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"force." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Force

Force

a body of men prepared for action, 1375; a body of police; policemen collectively, 1851. See also army, host, troop.

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"Force." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Force." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/force

force

forcecoarse, corse, course, divorce, endorse (US indorse), enforce, force, gorse, hoarse, horse, morse, Norse, perforce, reinforce, sauce, source, torse •Wilberforce • workforce • packhorse •carthorse • racehorse • sea horse •hobby horse • Whitehorse •sawhorse, warhorse •clothes horse • shire horse •workhorse • racecourse • concourse •intercourse • watercourse •outsource

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"force." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"force." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/force