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page1 / pāj/ • n. one side of a sheet of paper in a collection of sheets bound together, esp. as a book, magazine, or newspaper. ∎  the material written or printed on such a sheet of paper: she silently read several pages. ∎  a sheet of paper of such a kind considered as a whole, comprising both sides. ∎  a page of a newspaper or magazine set aside for a particular topic: the editorial page. ∎ Printing the type set for the printing of a page. ∎  Comput. a section of stored data, esp. that which can be displayed on a screen at one time. ∎  a significant episode or period considered as a part of a longer history: the inconsistency of this transaction has no parallel on any page of our political history. • v. [intr.] (page through) leaf through (a book, magazine, or newspaper): she was paging through an immense pile of Sunday newspapers. ∎  Comput. move through and display (text) one page at a time. ∎  [usu. as n.] (paging) Comput. divide (a piece of software or data) into sections, keeping the most frequently accessed in main memory and storing the rest in virtual memory. ∎  [tr.] assign numbers to the pages in (a book or periodical); paginate. ∎  [as adj. , in comb.] (-paged) having pages of a particular kind or number: a many-paged volume. PHRASES: on the same page (of two or more people) in agreement. page2 • n. a young person, usually in uniform, employed in a hotel or other establishment to run errands, open doors, etc. ∎  a young boy attending a bride at a wedding. ∎ hist. a boy in training for knighthood, ranking next below a squire in the personal service of a knight. ∎ hist. a man or boy employed as the personal attendant of a person of rank. • v. [tr.] summon (an individual) by name, typically over a public address system, so as to pass on a message: no need to interrupt the background music just to page the concierge. ∎  [often as n.] (paging) contact (someone) by means of a pager: many systems have paging as a standard feature.

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"page." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"page." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-2

"page." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-2

PAGE

PAGE (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) A type of electrophoresis used to determine the size and composition of proteins. Proteins are placed on a matrix of polyacrylamide gel and an electric field is applied. The protein molecules migrate towards the positive pole, the smaller molecules moving at a faster rate through the pores of the gel. The proteins are then detected by applying a stain, such as coomassie blue.

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"PAGE." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"PAGE." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page

"PAGE." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page

page

page The unit of interchange between memory and swapping device involved in a paging system. The number of words or bytes in a page is usually fixed for a given system and is almost invariably an exact power of 2. The term page frame is used as an alternative name for page, but is more particularly used to apply to the copy of a page that is held on the swapping device.

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"page." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"page." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page

"page." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page

page

page1 †boy, lad XIII; †youth in training for knighthood; †male person of low condition; boy (or man) employed as servant or attendant XIV, as in a great household, or (XVIII) a foot-boy or errand-boy at a house, hotel, etc. — (O)F. page, perh. — It. paggio; of uncert. orig.

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"page." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"page." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-3

page

page2 one side of a leaf of a book, etc. XV. — (O)F. page (reduction of pagene) — L. pāgina vine-trellis, column of writing, page or leaf, f. IE. *paĝ- fix (cf. PAGAN).
Hence vb. XVII. So paginate XIX; back-formation from pagination XIX. — F.

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page

page be on the same page in North American usage, be in agreement (compare sing from the same hymn sheet).
Page Three a British trademark term for a feature which formerly appeared daily on page three of the Sun newspaper and included a picture of a topless young woman.

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"page." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"page." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page

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page

pageage, assuage, backstage, cage, downstage, engage, enrage, gage, gauge, mage, multistage, offstage, onstage, Osage, page, Paige, rage, rampage, sage, stage, swage, under-age, upstage, wage •greengage • ribcage • birdcage •teenage • saxifrage • outrage •space-age

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"page." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"page." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-1

"page." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-1

PAGE

PAGE Biochem. polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

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"PAGE." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"PAGE." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/page-0