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polychlorinated biphenyl

polychlorinated biphenyl or PCB, any of a group of organic compounds originally widely used in industrial processes but later found to be dangerous environmental pollutants. Polychlorinated biphenyl is a fat-soluble, water-insoluble hydrocarbon containing chlorine. It is extremely stable, withstanding temperatures of up to 1,600°F (870°C), is fire-resistant, and has been used as a heat-transfer and insulating fluid in cooling systems and electrical equipment; it has also been used in sealants, rubber, paints, plastics, printing ink, and insecticides. The chemical has entered the environment largely as a pollutant from equipment leaks, the weathering of many materials that contain PCB, and through interaction with food products. PCBs are not readily biodegradable. Production has been banned in several industrialized countries; the United States stopped producing PCBs in 1977.

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"polychlorinated biphenyl." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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polychlorinated biphenyl

polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) One of a range of compounds, first synthesized in 1881 and manufactured in 1929 and used mainly as liquid insulators in heavy-duty electrical transformers. They were detected in the environment in 1966 and associated with reduced reproduction in marine birds and mammals; they are also believed to compromise the immune system. Restrictions on their use were imposed in North America and Europe in the early 1970s, but they continue to cause contamination, because of their persistence and as a consequence of careless disposal of old equipment containing them.

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"polychlorinated biphenyl." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polychlorinated biphenyl." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polychlorinated-biphenyl

"polychlorinated biphenyl." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polychlorinated-biphenyl

polychlorinated biphenyl

polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Any of several stable mixtures – liquid, resinous or crystalline – of organic compounds. They are fire-resistant and are used as lubricants and heat-transfer fluids. The use of PCBs has been restricted since 1973 because they are toxic and their resistance to decomposition in streams and soils poses a threat to wildlife.

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"polychlorinated biphenyl." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polychlorinated biphenyl." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/polychlorinated-biphenyl

"polychlorinated biphenyl." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/polychlorinated-biphenyl