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Natural Gas

Natural Gas

Background

Natural gas is a mixture of combustible gases formed underground by the decomposition of organic materials in plant and animal. It is usually found in areas where oil is present, although there are several large underground reservoirs of natural gas where there is little or no oil. Natural gas is widely used for heating and cooking, as well as for a variety of industrial applications.

History

Natural gas was known to early man in the form of seepages from rocks and springs. Sometimes, lightning or other sources of ignition would cause these gas seepages to burn, giving rise to stories of fire issuing from the ground. In about 900 b.c. natural gas was drawn from wells in China. The gas was burned, and the heat was used to evaporate seawater in order to produce salt. By the first century, the Chinese had developed more advanced techniques for tapping underground reservoirs of natural gas, which allowed them to drill wells as deep as 4,800 ft (1,460 m) in soft soil. They used metal drilling bits inserted through sections of hollowed-out bamboo pipes to reach the gas and bring it to the surface.

The Romans also knew about natural gas, and Julius Caesar was supposed to have witnessed a "burning spring" near Grenoble, France. Religious temples in early Russia were built around places where burning natural gas seepages formed "eternal flames."

In the United States, the first intentional use of natural gas occurred in 1821 when William Hart drilled a well to tap a shallow gas pocket along the bank of Canadaway Creek near Fredonia, New York. He piped the gas through hollowed logs to a nearby building where he burned it for illumination. In 1865, the Fredonia Gas, Light, and Waterworks Company became the first natural gas company in the United States. The first long-distance gas pipeline ran 25 mi (40 km) from a gas field to Rochester, New York, in 1872. It too used hollowed logs for pipes. The development of the Bunsen burner by Robert Bunsen in 1885 led to an interest in using natural gas as a source of heating and cooking, in addition to its use for lighting. In 1891, a high-pressure gas deposit was tapped in central Indiana, and a 120 mi (192 km) pipeline was built to bring the gas to Chicago, Illinois.

Despite these early efforts, the lack of a good distribution system for natural gas limited its use to local areas where the gas was found. Most of the gas that came to the surface as part of oil drilling in more remote areas was simply vented to the atmosphere or burned off in giant flares that illuminated the oil fields day and night. By the 1910s, oil companies realized that this practice was costing them potential profits and they began an aggressive program to install gas pipelines to large metropolitan areas across the United States. It wasn't until after World War II that this pipeline program had reached enough cities and towns to make natural gas an attractive alternative to electricity and coal.

By 2000, there were over 600 natural gas processing plants in the United States connected to more than 300,000 mi (480,000 km) of main transportation pipelines. Worldwide, there are also significant deposits of natural gas in the former Soviet Union, Canada, China, and the Arabian Gulf countries of the Middle East.

Raw Materials

Raw natural gas is composed of several gases. The main component is methane. Other components include ethane, propane, butane, and many other combustible hydrocarbons. Raw natural gas may also contain water vapor, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and helium.

During processing, many of these components may be removed. Some—such as ethane, propane, butane, hydrogen sulfide, and helium—may be partially or completely removed to be processed and sold as separate commodities. Other components—such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen—may be removed to improve the quality of the natural gas or to make it easier to move the gas over great distances through pipelines.

The resulting processed natural gas contains mostly methane and ethane, although there is no such thing as a "typical" natural gas. Certain other components may be added to the processed gas to give it special qualities. For example, a chemical known as mercaptan is added to give the gas a distinctive odor that warns people of a leak.

The Manufacturing Process

The methods used to extract, process, transport, store, and distribute natural gas depend on the location and composition of the raw gas and the location and application of the gas by the end users. Here is a typical sequence of operations used to produce natural gas for home heating and cooking use.

Extracting

  • 1 Some underground natural gas reservoirs are under enough internal pressure that the gas can flow up the well and reach Earth's surface without additional help. However, most wells require a pump to bring the gas (and oil, if it is present) to the surface. The most common pump has a long rod attached to a piston deep in the well. The rod is alternately pulled upward and plunged back into the well by a beam that slowly rocks up and down on top of a vertical support. This configuration is often called a horse head pump because the shape of the pulling mechanism on the end of the rocking beam resembles a horse's head.
  • 2 When the raw natural gas reaches the surface, it is separated from any oil that might be present and is piped to a central gas processing plant nearby. Several hundred wells may all feed into the same plant.

Processing

  • 3 About 75% of the raw natural gas in the United States comes from underground reservoirs where little or no oil is present. This gas is easier to process than gas from oil wells. Regardless of the source, most raw natural gas contains dirt, sand, and water vapor, which must be removed before further processing to prevent contamination and corrosion of the equipment and pipelines. The dirt and sand are removed with filters or traps near the well. The water vapor is usually removed by passing the gas through a tower filled with granules of a solid desiccant, such as alumina or silica gel, or through a liquid desiccant, such as a glycol. After it has been cleaned and dried, the raw gas may be processed further or it may be sent directly to a compressor station and pumped into a main transportation pipeline.
  • 4 If the raw natural gas contains a large amount of heavier hydrocarbon gases, such as propane and butane, these materials are removed to be sold separately. The most common method is to bubble the raw gas up through a tall, closed tower containing a cold absorption oil, similar to kerosene. As the gas comes in contact with the cold oil, the heavier hydrocarbon gases condense into liquids and are trapped in the oil. The lighter hydrocarbon gases, such as methane and ethane, do not condense into liquid and flow out the top of the tower. About 85% of the propane and almost all of the butane and heavier hydrocarbons are trapped this way. The absorption oil is then distilled to remove the trapped hydrocarbons, which are separated into individual components in a fractionation tower.
  • 5 At this point, the natural gas contains methane, ethane, and a small amount of propane that wasn't trapped. It may also contain varying amounts of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen, and other materials. A portion of the ethane is sometimes removed to be used as a raw material in various chemical processes. To accomplish this, the water vapor in the gas is further reduced using one of several methods, and the gas is then subjected to repeated compression and expansion cycles to cool the ethane and capture it as a liquid.
  • 6 Some natural gas contains a high percentage of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. These chemicals can react with the remaining water vapor in the gas to form an acid, which can cause corrosion. They are removed by flowing the gas up through a tower while a spray of water mixed with a solvent, such as monoethanolamine, is injected at the top. The solvent reacts with the chemicals, and the solution is drained off the bottom of the tower for further processing.
  • 7 Some natural gas also contains a high percentage of nitrogen. Because nitrogen does not burn, it reduces the heating value of the natural gas. After the carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide have been removed, the gas goes through a low-temperature distillation process to liquefy and separate the nitrogen. Together, the processes in steps 6 and 7 are sometimes called "upgrading" the gas because the natural gas is now cleaner and will burn hotter.
  • 8 If helium gas is to be captured, it is done after the nitrogen is removed. This involves a complex distillation and purification process to isolate the helium from other gases. Natural gas is the primary source of industrial helium in the United States.

Transporting

  • 9 Mercaptan is injected into the processed natural gas to give it a distinctive warning odor, and the gas is piped to a compressor station where the pressure is increased to about 200-1,500 psi (1,380-10,350 kPa). The gas is then transported across country through one of several major pipelines installed underground. These pipelines range from 20 to 42 in (51 to 107 cm) in diameter. About every 100 mi (160 km), another compressor boosts the gas pressure to make up for small pressure losses caused by friction between the gas and the pipe walls. This keeps the gas flowing.
  • 10 When the pressurized natural gas reaches the vicinity of its final destination, it is sometimes injected back into the ground for storage. Depleted underground gas and oil reservoirs, porous rock layers known as aquifers, or subterranean salt caverns may be used to store the gas. This ensures a ready supply during the colder winter months.

Distributing

  • 11 When gas is needed, it is drawn out of underground storage and is transported through pipelines at pressures up to 1,000 psi (6,900 kPa). These pipelines bring the gas into the city or area where it is to be used.
  • 12 The pressure is reduced to below 60 psi (410 kPa), and the gas is distributed in underground pipes that run throughout the area. Before the gas is piped into each house or business, the pressure is further reduced to about 0.25 psi (1.7 kPa).

Quality Control

Natural gas burns readily in air and can explode violently if a large quantity is suddenly ignited. Entire buildings have been leveled by powerful blasts resulting from natural gas leaks. In other cases, people have suffocated in closed rooms that slowly filled with natural gas. Because natural gas is odorless, foul-smelling mercaptan is added to the gas so that even a small leak will be immediately noticeable. To protect high-pressure underground gas pipelines, a bright yellow plastic tape is buried in the ground a few feet above the pipeline to warn people who might be digging in the area. That way, they will uncover the tape before they actually strike the pipeline below. Warning signs are also placed at ground level along the entire length of the pipeline as an additional precaution.

The Future

Because natural gas is clean burning, it is being considered as an alternative fuel for motor vehicles. Compressed natural gas (CNG) cars and trucks are already on the road in many areas. Companies using industrial processes that require high temperatures are also turning to natural gas instead of other fuels in order to reduce the air pollution emitted by their plants. This includes companies involved in manufacturing steel, glass, ceramics, cement, paper, chemicals, aluminum, and processed foods.

Where to Learn More

Books

Kroschwitz, Jacqueline I., and Mary Howe-Grant (eds.). "Gas, Natural." In Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology. 4th ed., vol. 12. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1993.

Tussing, Arlon R., and Bob Tippee. The Natural Gas Industry: Evolution, Structure, and Economics. 2nd ed. Tulsa, OK: PennWell Publishing, 1995.

Other

Natural Gas Information and Educational Resources. http://www.naturalgas.org (November 1, 2000).

Pacific Gas and Electric Company. "How Our Gas System Works." http://www.pge.com/006_news/006c2gassys.shtml (November 12, 2000).

ChrisCavette

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Natural Gas

Natural gas

Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons (molecules that contain only carbon and hydrogen) and gases (most notably methane, ethane, propane, and butane) that exist naturally in rocks beneath the surface of the earth. It is widely used as a heating source, and in some cases, specific portions of the natural gas are used as starting materials in industrial processes. Natural gas is the product of the decaying of living matter over millions of years (as is also true for petroleum ). Specific conditions, including low oxygen levels, are necessary for this to occur. The hydrocarbon gases are trapped in geological formations known as anticlines. Each of the major hydrocarbon components of natural gas is used as a fuel source.

Natural gas has its origins in decayed living matter, most likely as the result of the action of bacteria upon dead animal and plant material. In order for most bacteria to effectively break down organic matter to hydrocarbons, there must be low levels of oxygen present. This would mean that the decaying matter was buried (most likely under water ) before it could be completely degraded to carbon dioxide and water. Conditions such as this are likely to have been met in coastal areas where sedimentary rocks and marine bacteria are common. The actions of heat and pressure along with bacteria produced a mixture of hydrocarbons. The smaller molecules which exist as gases were then either trapped in porous rocks or in underground reservoirs where they formed sources of hydrocarbon fuels .

Natural gas, like petroleum, is a mixture of many organic substances. The exact composition of different sources of natural gas varies slightly, but in all cases, methane is by far the most common component, with other hydrocarbons also being very common. Other gases such as oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide make up the rest of most natural gas sources. The largest sources of natural gas in the United States are found in Alaska, Texas, Oklahoma, western Pennsylvania, and Ohio. It is estimated that the supply of natural gas in this country may be sufficient to last for two centuriesalthough the more readily accessible sources have been used, meaning that it will be more expensive to obtain natural gas in the future.

Natural gas is believed to have been first discovered and used by the Chinese, perhaps as early as 1000 b.c.Shallow stores of natural gas were released from just beneath the ground and piped short distances to be used as a fuel source. Natural gas could provide a continuous source of energy for flames. These "eternal fires" were found in temples and also used as attractions for visitors. In the 1800s, natural gas began to be piped short distances as a light source. With the discovery of oil in the 1860s, natural gas was largely ignored as a fuel source. One of the early difficulties with natural gas was in transporting it from the source to other sites for use. The combination of electric lights and petroleum meant that containers of natural gas were used as heat sources for cooking in homes but for little else.

As the technology for piping gas from the source began to improve, it became possible to pipe natural gas over thousands of miles. This has meant that natural gas has become as convenient as petroleum and coal to use as a fuel source, and often with far less pollution. Natural gas burns with almost no byproducts except for carbon dioxide and water (as opposed to coal which often has large amounts of sulfur in it), and the heat released from the reaction (combustion of any of the hydrocarbon components of natural gas is an exothermic process). The combustion of methane, the most prevalent component of natural gas, is described by the reaction below:

CH4 + O2 CO2 + H2O + heat energy

Ethane is used less as a fuel source than as a starting material for the production of ethylene (acetylene), which is used in welding.

Both butane and propane are relatively easy to liquefy and store. Liquefied propane and butane are used in disposable lighters and as camping fuels.

Because gases take up large amounts of space , they can be inconvenient to transport and store. The ability to liquefy the components of natural gas (either as a mixture or in isolation) has made natural gas much more practical as an energy source. The liquefaction of natural gas takes advantage of the different boiling points of methane, ethane, and other gases as a way of purifying each substance. A combination of refrigeration and increased pressure allows the individual gases to be stored and transported conveniently. At one time, the natural gas that often accompanied petroleum in the ground was simply burned off as a means of getting rid of it. Recently, however, this gas has been collected, liquefied and used along with the petroleum.

See also Fuels and fuel chemistry; Petroleum extraction

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Natural Gas

Natural gas

Natural gas is a fossil fuel. Most scientists believe natural gas was created by the same forces that formed oil, another fossil fuel. In prehistoric times, much of Earth was covered by water containing billions of tiny plants and animals that died and accumulated on ocean floors. Over the ages, sand and mud also drifted down to the ocean floor. As these layers piled up over millions of years, their weight created pressure and heat that changed the decaying organic material into oil and gas. In many places, solid rock formed above the oil and gas, trapping it in reservoirs.

Natural gas consists mainly of methane, the simplest hydrocarbon (organic compound that contains only carbon and hydrogen). It also contains small amounts of heavier, more complex hydrocarbons such as ethane, butane, and propane. Some natural gas includes impurities such as hydrogen sulfide ("sour" gas), carbon dioxide ("acid" gas), and water ("wet" gas). During processing, impurities are removed and valuable hydrocarbons are extracted. Sulfur and carbon dioxide are sometimes recovered and sold as by-products. Propane and butane are usually liquified under pressure and sold separately as LPG (liquified petroleum gas).

History of the discovery and use of natural gas

Natural gas is believed to have been first discovered and used by the Chinese, perhaps as early as 1000 b.c. Shallow stores of natural gas were released from just beneath the ground and piped short distances to be used as a fuel source. Natural gas provided a continuous source of energy for flames. These "eternal fires" were found in temples and also used as attractions for visitors.

In 1821, an American gunsmith named William Aaron Hart drilled the first natural gas well in the United States. (To extract natural gas from the ground, a well must be drilled to penetrate the cap rock that covers it.) It was covered with a large barrel, and the gas was directed through wooden pipes that were replaced a few years later with lead pipe.

In the early 1900s, huge amounts of natural gas were found in Texas and Oklahoma, and in the 1920s modern seamless steel pipe was introduced.

The strength of this new pipe, which could be welded into long sections, allowed gas to be carried under higher pressures and, thus, in greater quantities. For the first time, natural gas transportation became profitable, and the American pipeline network grew tremendously through the 1930s and 1940s. By 1950, almost 300,000 miles (482,700 kilometers) of gas pipeline had been laida length greater than existing oil pipes.

Natural gas now supplies more than one-fourth of all energy consumed in America. In homes, natural gas is used in furnaces, stoves, water heaters, clothes dryers, and other appliances. The fuel also supplies energy for numerous industrial processes and provides raw materials for making many products that we use every day.

Natural gas and the environment

In light of environmental concerns, natural gas has begun to be reconsidered as a fuel for generating electricity. Natural gas is the cleanest burning fossil fuel, producing mostly just water vapor and carbon dioxide as by-products. Several gas power generation technologies have been advanced over the years, including a process that uses the principles of electrogasdynamics (EGD).

Words to Know

Fossil fuel: Fuels formed by decaying plants and animals on the ocean floor that were covered by layers of sand and mud. Over millions of years, the layers of sediment created pressure and heat that helped bacteria change the decaying organic material into oil and gas.

Hydrocarbons: Molecules composed solely of hydrogen and carbon atoms.

[See also Gases, liquefaction of; Petroleum ]

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natural gas

natural gas, natural mixture of gaseous hydrocarbons found issuing from the ground or obtained from specially driven wells. The composition of natural gas varies in different localities. Its chief component, methane, usually makes up from 80% to 95%, and the balance is composed of varying amounts of ethane, propane, butane, and other hydrocarbon compounds. Some of the hydrocarbons found in gasoline also occur as vapors in natural gas; by liquefying these hydrocarbons, gasoline can be obtained.

Although commonly associated with petroleum deposits it also occurs separately in sand, sandstone, limestone, and shale deposits. Some geologists theorize that natural gas is a byproduct of decaying vegetable matter in underground strata, while others think it may be primordial gases that rise up from the mantle. Because of its flammability and high calorific value, natural gas is used extensively as an illuminant and a fuel.

Natural gas was known to the ancients but was considered by them to be a supernatural phenomenon because, noticed only when ignited, it appeared as a mysterious fire bursting from the ground. One of the earliest attempts to harness it for economic use occurred in the early 19th cent. in Fredonia, N.Y. Toward the latter part of the 19th cent., large industrial cities began to make use of natural gas, and extensive pipeline systems have been constructed to transport gas. Since the late 20th cent., improvements in hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking" —in which pressurized fluids are injected into a well to induce rock fractures that allow the release of natural gas—and its use in combination with horizontal drilling has permitted natural gas to extracted from previously untappable deposits of shale.

Liquefied natural gas, or LNG, is natural gas that has been pressurized and cooled so as to liquefy it for convenience in shipping and storage. The boiling point of natural gas is extremely low, and only in the 1970s did cryogenic technology (see low-temperature physics) advance enough to make the production and transport of LNG commerically feasible. Some of the natural gas moved to and from the United States is carried as LNG in special tankers.

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natural gas

natural gas Naturally occurring fossil fuel, consisting of hydrocarbons trapped in sedimentary rocks. Natural gas is the gaseous component of petroleum and is extracted from oil wells. The fossil history of gas and petroleum is the same, since they were both formed by the decomposition of ancient marine plankton. Before natural gas can be used as a fuel, the heavier hydrocarbons of butane and propane are extracted; in liquid form, these hydrocarbons are forced into containers as bottled gas. The remaining ‘dry gas’ is piped to consumers for use as fuel. Dry gas is composed of methane and ethane.

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natural gas

natural gas Gaseous hydrocarbons, chiefly methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10), trapped in pore spaces in rocks with or without liquid petroleum. It has a high heat value and burns without smoke or soot; it provides raw material for the chemical industry for making plastics, detergents, fertilizers, etc. Gas of this composition is also termed ‘natural gas’ if it occurs as a gas chimney or after production.

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natural gas

natural gas Gaseous hydrocarbons, chiefly methane (CH4), ethane (C2H6), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10), trapped in pore spaces in rocks with or without liquid petroleum. It has a high heat value, burns without smoke or soot, and provides raw material for the chemical industry for making plastics, detergents, fertilizers, etc. Gas of this composition is also termed ‘natural gas’ if it occurs as an industrial by-product.

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natural gas

nat·u·ral gas • n. flammable gas, consisting largely of methane and other hydrocarbons, occurring naturally underground (often in association with petroleum) and used as fuel.

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Natural Gas

NATURAL GAS

This entry consists of the following articles:

economic exploitation of natural gas

middle east reserves of natural gas

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