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glycerol

glycerol, glycerin, glycerine, or 1,2,3-propanetriol (prō´pāntrī´ŏl), CH2OHCHOHCH2OH, colorless, odorless, sweet-tasting, syrupy liquid. Glycerol is a trihydric alcohol. It melts at 17.8°C, boils with decomposition at 290°C, and is miscible with water and ethanol. It is hygroscopic; i.e., it absorbs water from the air; this property makes it valuable as a moistener in cosmetics. Glycerol is present in the form of its esters (glycerides) in all animal and vegetable fats and oils. It is obtained commercially as a byproduct when fats and oils are hydrolyzed to yield fatty acids or their metal salts (soaps). Glycerol is also synthesized on a commercial scale from propylene (obtained by cracking petroleum), since supplies of natural glycerol are inadequate. Glycerol can also be obtained during the fermentation of sugars if sodium bisulfite is added with the yeast. Glycerol is widely used as a solvent; as a sweetener; in the manufacture of dynamite, cosmetics, liquid soaps, candy, liqueurs, inks, and lubricants; to keep fabrics pliable; as a component of antifreeze mixtures; as a source of nutrients for fermentation cultures in the production of antibiotics; and in medicine. It has many other uses as well.

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"glycerol." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"glycerol." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/glycerol

glycerol

glycerol A trihydric alcohol, chemically 1,2,3‐propane triol (CH2OHCHOHCH2OH), also known as glycerine. Simple or neutral fats are esters of glycerol with three molecules of fatty acid, i.e. triacylglycerols, sometimes known as triglycerides. See also glycerides.

Glycerol is a colourless, odourless, viscous liquid, sweet to taste; it is made from fats by alkaline hydrolysis (saponification). Used as a solvent for flavours, as a humectant to keep foods moist, and in cake batters to improve texture and slow staling.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glycerol

glycerol

glycerol (glycerine; propane-1,2,3,-triol) A trihydric alcohol, HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH. Glycerol is a colourless sweet-tasting viscous liquid, miscible with water but insoluble in ether. It is widely distributed in all living organisms as a constituent of the glycerides, which yield glycerol when hydrolysed. Glycerol itself is used as an antifreeze molecule by certain organisms.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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glycerol

glyc·er·ol / ˈglisəˌrôl; -ˌräl/ • n. a colorless, sweet, viscous liquid, CH2(OH)CH(OH)CH2(OH), formed as a by-product in soap manufacture. It is used as an emollient and laxative, and for making explosives and antifreeze.

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"glycerol." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glycerol." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glycerol

"glycerol." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glycerol

glycerol

glycerol (glycerine) Thick, syrupy, sweet liquid (1,2,3–trihydroxypropane, CH2OHCH(OH)CH2OH) obtained as a by-product of soap, and synthesized industrially from propene. It is used in the manufacture of various products, including paints, cosmetics, and explosives.

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"glycerol." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glycerol." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/glycerol

"glycerol." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/glycerol

glycerol

glycerol A three-carbon, linear, trihydroxy alcohol. Its fatty esters are a very important constituent of many lipids, and some of its phosphorylated derivatives are intermediates in glycolysis.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glycerol-0

glycerol

glycerol A 3-carbon, linear, trihydroxy alcohol. Its fatty esters are a very important constituent of many lipids, and some of its phosphorylated derivatives are intermediates in glycolysis.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"glycerol." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glycerol