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glyceride

glyceride (acylglycerol) A fatty-acid ester of glycerol. Esterification can occur at one, two, or all three hydroxyl groups of the glycerol molecule producing monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides respectively. Triglycerides are the major constituent of fats and oils found in living organisms. Alternatively, one of the hydroxyl groups may be esterified with a phosphate group forming a phosphoglyceride (see phospholipid) or a sugar forming a glycolipid.

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"glyceride." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride-1

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride-1

glyceride

glyceride An ester formed from glycerol and between one and three fatty-acid molecules, respectively designated mono-, di-, or triglyceride. Glycerides serve variously as sources of energy, and triglycerides (lipids) also serve as thermal and mechanical insulators.

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"glyceride." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride-0

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride-0

glyceride

glyceride An ester formed from glycerol and between 1 and 3 fatty-acid molecules, respectively designated mono-, di-, or tri-glyceride. Glycerides serve variously as sources of energy, and triglycerides (lipids) also serve as thermal and mechanical insulators.

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"glyceride." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride

"glyceride." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride

glyceride

glyc·er·ide / ˈglisəˌrīd/ • n. a fatty acid ester of glycerol.

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"glyceride." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"glyceride." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride

"glyceride." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/glyceride