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Cellulose

Cellulose

Cellulose is the substance that makes up most of a plant's cell walls. Since it is made by all plants, it is probably the most abundant organic compound on Earth. Aside from being the primary building material for plants, cellulose has many others uses. According to how it is treated, cellulose can be used to make paper, film, explosives, and plastics, in addition to having many other industrial uses. The paper in this book contains cellulose, as do some of the clothes you are wearing. For humans, cellulose is also a major source of needed fiber in our diet.

The structure of cellulose

Cellulose is usually described by chemists and biologists as a complex carbohydrate (pronounced car-bow-HI-drayt). Carbohydrates are organic compounds made up of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen that function as sources of energy for living things. Plants are able to make their own carbohydrates that they use for energy and to build their cell walls. According to how many atoms they have, there are several different types of carbohydrates, but the simplest and most common in a plant is glucose. Plants make glucose (formed by photosynthesis) to use for energy or to store as starch for later use. A plant uses glucose to make cellulose when it links many simple units of glucose together to form long chains. These long chains are called polysaccharides (meaning "many sugars"

and pronounced pahl-lee-SAK-uh-rydes), and they form very long molecules that plants use to build their walls.

It is because of these long molecules that cellulose is insoluble or does not dissolve easily in water. These long molecules also are formed into a criss-cross mesh that gives strength and shape to the cell wall. Thus while some of the food that a plant makes when it converts light energy into chemical energy (photosynthesis) is used as fuel and some is stored, the rest is turned into cellulose that serves as the main building material for a plant. Cellulose is ideal as a structural material since its fibers give strength and toughness to a plant's leaves, roots, and stems.

Cellulose and plant cells

Since cellulose is the main building material out of which plants are made, and plants are the primary or first link in what is known as the food chain (which describes the feeding relationships of all living things), cellulose is a very important substance. It was first isolated in 1834 by the French chemist Anselme Payen (17951871), who earlier had isolated the first enzyme. While studying different types of wood, Payen obtained a substance that he knew was not starch (glucose or sugar in its stored form), but which still could be broken down into its basic units of glucose just as starch can. He named this new substance "cellulose" because he had obtained it from the cell walls of plants.

Words to Know

Carbohydrate: A compound consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen found in plants and used as a food by humans and other animals.

Glucose: Also known as blood sugar; a simple sugar broken down in cells to produce energy.

Photosynthesis: Chemical process by which plants containing chlorophyll use sunlight to manufacture their own food by converting carbon dioxide and water to carbohydrates, releasing oxygen as a by-product.

As the chief constituent (or main ingredient) of the cell walls of plants, cellulose performs a structural or skeletal function. Just as our hard, bony skeletons provide attachment points for our muscles and support our bodies, so the rigidity or stiffness found in any plant is due to the strength of its cell walls. Examined under a powerful microscope, fibers of cellulose are seen to have a meshed or criss-cross pattern that looks as if it were woven much as cloth. The cell wall has been likened to the way reinforced concrete is made, with the cellulose fibers acting as the rebars or steel rods do in concrete (providing extra strength). As the new cell grows, layer upon layer of new material is deposited inside the last layer, meaning that the oldest material is always on the outside of the plant.

Human uses of cellulose

Cellulose is one of the most widely used natural substances and has become one of the most important commercial raw materials. The major sources of cellulose are plant fibers (cotton, hemp, flax, and jute are almost all cellulose) and, of course, wood (about 42 percent cellulose). Since cellulose is insoluble in water, it is easily separated from the other constituents of a plant. Cellulose has been used to make paper since the Chinese first invented the process around a.d. 100. Cellulose is separated from wood by a pulping process that grinds woodchips under flowing water. The pulp that remains is then washed, bleached, and poured over a vibrating mesh. When the water finally drains from the pulp, what remains is an interlocking web of fibers that, when dried, pressed, and smoothed, becomes a sheet of paper.

Raw cotton is 91 percent cellulose, and its fiber cells are found on the surface of the cotton seed. There are thousands of fibers on each seed, and as the cotton pod ripens and bursts open, these fiber cells die. Because these fiber cells are primarily cellulose, they can be twisted to form thread or yarn that is then woven to make cloth. Since cellulose reacts easily to both strong bases and acids, a chemical process is often used to make other products. For example, the fabric known as rayon and the transparent sheet of film called cellophane are made using a many-step process that involves an acid bath. In mixtures if nitric and sulfuric acids, cellulose can form what is called guncotton or cellulose nitrates that are used for explosives. However, when mixed with camphor, cellulose produces a plastic known as celluloid, which was used for early motion-picture film. However, because it was highly flammable (meaning it could easily catch fire), it was eventually replaced by newer and more stable plastic materials. Although cellulose is still an important natural resource, many of the products that were made from it are being produced easier and cheaper using other materials.

Importance to human diet

Despite the fact that humans (and many other animals) cannot digest cellulose (meaning that their digestive systems cannot break it down into its basic constituents), cellulose is nonetheless a very important part of the healthy human diet. This is because it forms a major part of the dietary fiber that we know is important for proper digestion. Since we cannot break cellulose down and it passes through our systems basically unchanged, it acts as what we call bulk or roughage that helps the movements of our intestines. Among mammals, only those that are ruminants (cudchewing animals like cows and horses) can process cellulose. This is because they have special bacteria and microorganisms in their digestive tracts that do it for them. They are then able to absorb the broken-down cellulose and use its sugar as a food source. Fungi are also able to break down cellulose into sugar that they can absorb, and they play a major role in the decomposition (rotting) of wood and other plant material.

[See also Plant ]

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Cellulose

Cellulose


Cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule in nature. It is a polysaccharide assembled from glucose monomer units, and it (together with other materials such as hemicellulose and lignin) is the main constituent of plant cell walls. Along with several undigestible polysaccharides, cellulose constitutes the main part of dietary fiber. Specifically cellulose is one of the components of insoluble fiber.

The glucose units in cellulose are combined in a way that results in the formation of very linear, flat molecules that can, in turn, form sheets that possess extensive networks of hydrogen bonds . The hydrogen bonds are both within individual sheets and between successive sheets. As a result of these bonds, sheets of cellulose are particularly stronga property critical to the function of plant cell walls. Cellulose shows a variable degree of polymerization, with anywhere from 1,000 to 14,000 glucose residues comprising a single cellulose polymer. Because of its high molecular weight and crystalline structure, cellulose is insoluble in water and has a poor ability to absorb water.

Human beings lack the enzyme cellulase and are therefore unable to break cellulose down to individual glucose molecules. Although many fungi are able to break down cellulose to glucose, only a few types of bacteria have this ability. In the rumina of cows, sheep, and goats, two different types of bacteria produce the enzyme that breaks down cellulose.

Cellulose and its derivatives are used in a number of food products to modify those foods in different ways (e.g., as a thickener, stabilizer, or texturizer). The fibrous form is a basic material that is used to make both textiles and paper. Cellulose is also used to make nitrocellulose (an ingredient in explosives and lacquers) and as a binder in the manufacture of medicinal tablets.

see also Fibers; Polymers, Natural; Polysaccharides.

Matthew A. Fisher

Bibliography

Atkins, Peter W. (1987). Molecules. New York: W. H. Freeman.

Internet Resources

Department of Polymer Science, University of Southern Mississippi. "Cellulose." Available from <http://www.psrc.usm.edu/macrog/>.

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cellulose

cellulose, chief constituent of the cell walls of plants. Chemically, it is a carbohydrate that is a high molecular weight polysaccharide. Raw cotton is composed of 91% pure cellulose; other important natural sources are flax, hemp, jute, straw, and wood. Cellulose has been used for the manufacture of paper since the 2d cent. Insoluble in water and other ordinary solvents, it exhibits marked properties of absorption. Because cellulose contains a large number of hydroxyl groups, it reacts with acids to form esters and with alcohols to form ethers. Cellulose derivatives include guncotton, fully nitrated cellulose, used for explosives; celluloid (the first plastic), the product of cellulose nitrates treated with camphor; collodion, a thickening agent; and cellulose acetate, used for plastics, lacquers, and fibers such as rayon.

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Cellulose

Cellulose

Cellulose is a major structural component of the cell walls of all land plants, including trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. The cell wall is a complex polysaccharide layer that surrounds each cell within a plant. Chemically, cellulose is a polysaccharide made up of long, unbranched chains of glucose linked end to end, making a very flat chain. (Starch is also made up of glucose, but linked such that it curls, resulting in very different properties.) Many cellulose chains associate side by side to make a cellulose ribbon, or microfibril, that has exceptional mechanical strength and chemical stability. Cellulose microfibrils, which are approximately 5 to 10 nanometers thick and many micrometers long, make cell walls strong and able to resist large forces, such as those generated internally by turgor pressure or externally by the weight of the plant or by wind. Economically, cellulose is important as a major component of wood products and of fibers used to make paper and textiles, such as cotton and linen. For industry, cellulose is dissolved and spun as a thread (called rayon) or formed into a thin sheet (cellophane). Cellulose is also chemically modified to make many kinds of films (such as cellulose acetate), thickeners used in foods and paints, and coatings such as nail polish (which contains cellulose nitrate).

see also Carbohydrates; Cell Walls; Fiber and Fiber Products.

Daniel Cosgrove

Bibliography

Brett, C. T., and K. Waldron. Physiology and Biochemistry of Plant Cell Walls, 2nd ed. London: Chapman and Hall, 1996.

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cellulose

cellulose A polysaccharide of glucose units which is not hydrolysed by mammalian digestive enzymes; the main component of plant cell walls. It is digested by the bacterial enzyme cellulase, and only ruminants and animals that have a large caecum have an adequate population of intestinal bacteria to permit them to digest cellulose to any significant extent. There is little digestion of cellulose in the human large intestine; nevertheless, it serves a valuable purpose in providing bulk to the intestinal contents, and is one of the major components of dietary fibre or non‐starch polysaccharides.

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cellulose

cellulose A polysaccharide that consists of a long unbranched chain of glucose units (see formula). It is the main constituent of the cell walls of all plants, many algae, and some fungi and is responsible for providing the rigidity of the cell wall. It is an important constituent of dietary fibre. Cellulose occurs typically as microfibrils, each consisting of long parallel arrays of 50–60 cellulose molecules. The fibrous nature of extracted cellulose has led to its use in the textile industry for the production of cotton, artificial silk, etc.

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cellulose

cel·lu·lose / ˈselyəˌlōs; -ˌlōz/ • n. 1. an insoluble substance that is the main constituent of plant cell walls and of vegetable fibers such as cotton. 2. paint or lacquer consisting principally of cellulose acetate or nitrate in solution. DERIVATIVES: cel·lu·lo·sic / ˌselyəˈlōsik; -ˈlōzik/ adj.

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cellulose

cellulose Polysaccharide, carbohydrate (C6H10O5)n that is the structural constituent of the cell walls of plants and algae. Consisting of parallel unbranched chains of glucose units cross-linked together into a stable structure, it forms the basic material of the paper and textile industries. The first synthetic cellulose was produced in 1996 by Japanese chemists.

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cellulose

cellulose A straight-chain, insoluble polysaccharide that is composed of glucose molecules linked by beta-1, 4 glycosidic (see GLYCOSIDE) bonds. It is the principal structural material of plants, and as such is the most abundant organic compound in the world. It has also been found in certain sea squirts.

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cellulose

cellulose A straight-chain, insoluble polysaccharide composed of glucose molecules linked by (β-1, 4 glycosidic bonds. It is the principal structural material of plants, and as such is the most abundant organic compound in the world. It has also been found in certain sea squirts (Urochordata).

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cellulose

cellulose A straight-chain, insoluble polysaccharide that is composed of glucose molecules linked by beta-1,4 glycosidic bonds. It is the principal structural material of plants, and as such is the most abundant organic compound in the world. It has also been found in certain sea squirts.

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cellulose

cellulose adj. consisting of cells XVIII; sb. a carbohydrate, main constituent of plant-cell walls XIX. As adj. — modL. cellulōsus; as sb. — F. cellulose; see prec. and -OSE.
Hence celluloid XIX; the use of -OID is arbitrary.

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cellulose

cellulose (sel-yoo-lohz) n. a carbohydrate consisting of linked glucose units. It is an important constituent of plant cell walls. Cellulose cannot be digested by humans and is a component of dietary fibre (roughage).

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cellulose

celluloseadiós, chausses, Close, Davos, dose, engross, gross, Grosz, jocose, morose, Rhos, verbose •grandiose • religiose • otiose •globose • viscose • bellicose • varicose •vorticose • cellulose • lachrymose •lactose • comatose • siliquose

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