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steady-state theory

steady-state theory Cosmological theory proposed (1948) by Austrian astronomers Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold, and further developed by Fred Hoyle and others. According to this theory, the Universe has always existed; it had no beginning and will continue forever. Although the universe is expanding, it maintains its average density – steady-state – through the continuous creation of new matter. Most cosmologists now reject the theory because it cannot explain background radiation or the observation that the appearance of the universe changes with time.

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"steady-state theory." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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steady-state theory

steady-state theory: see cosmology.

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"steady-state theory." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"steady-state theory." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/steady-state-theory

"steady-state theory." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/steady-state-theory