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Veronica

Veronica

A religious term for a cloth bearing the likeness of Jesus imprinted miraculously. The term was coined by St. Gregory of Tours (538-594 C.E.), deriving from the Greek icon (image) and Latin vera (true).

The story of veronica is that a woman of rank, living in the Via Dolorosa, broke through the procession of Jesus' crucifixion when it stopped for Simon of Cyrene to assist in carrying the cross. The woman, usually named as Seraphia (sometimes called Veronica), wiped the face of Jesus with a cloth, and the miraculous portrait became impressed from the blood and sweat. Other versions of the story claim that the woman simply handed the cloth to Jesus, who wiped his own face and returned the cloth. A detailed and highly circumstantial version of the incident was given by Anne Catherine Emmerich (see Germany ) when in an ecstatic trance.

A claimed veronica was placed in a marble coffer on the altar of a chapel attached to St. Peter's in Rome during the period of Sixtus V, but it was moved in 1440 and is said to be deposited in the Vatican. Another cloth with a similar miraculous portrait was presented by two Fathers to the seventh synod of Nice, C.E. 787. Such miraculous likenesses not made by people are also known as Acheropites.

In 1813, when a vault was opened in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, England, one of the coffins, believed to be that of Charles I, was opened and a portrait found on the grave cloth which had wrapped the body. The myth which surrounds the Turin Shroud is quite similar to that of the veronicas.

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"Veronica." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Veronica

Veronica (speedwell; family Scrophulariaceae) A genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs that have simple or lobed, opposite leaves without stipules. The flowers are usually blue, but sometimes pink or white. They are bisexual and are held in axillary or terminal racemes, or, if they are 5-lobed, solitarily in leaf axils. The calyx is fused and 4-lobed, or 5-lobed but with a very small upper lobe. The corolla is fused into a very short tube with 4 lobes; the upper, composed of 2 fused components, being the largest. There are 2 stamens and a superior ovary of 2 fused carpels. The fruit is an elongated, flattened capsule. There are about 250 species, present throughout temperate regions in a wide variety of habitats. Many species are cultivated as ornamentals.

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"Veronica." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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veronica

ve·ron·i·ca / vəˈränəkə/ • n. 1. a herbaceous plant of north temperate regions, typically with upright stems bearing narrow pointed leaves and spikes of blue or purple flowers. • Genus Veronica, family Scrophulariaceae: many species, including the speedwells. 2. a cloth supposedly impressed with an image of Jesus' face. ∎  a picture of Jesus' face similar to this. 3. (in bullfighting) a slow movement of the cape away from a charging bull by the matador, who stands in place.

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"veronica." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Veronica

Veronica Acronym for very easy rodent-oriented network index to computerized archives (the reference to rodents being related to the Gopher system). An information-retrieval tool on the Internet. A Veronica server holds an index of Gopher server systems, which can be accessed using Gopher on a workstation; the result of a search of the index is a menu of Gopher server systems that contain relevant information, and this menu can then be used by the workstation to connect directly to the Gopher servers.

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"Veronica." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Veronica, St

Veronica, St according to tradition, a woman of Jerusalem who offered her headcloth to Christ on the way to Calvary, to wipe the blood and sweat from his face. The cloth is said to have retained the image of his features, and is called a vernicle or veronica in her honour.

The term veronica also denotes the movement of a matador's cape away from a charging bull; this is said to be by association of the attitude of the matador with the depiction of St Veronica holding out a cloth to Christ.

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"Veronica, St." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Veronica, St

Veronica, St. A woman of Jerusalem who, according to legend, offered her head-cloth to Jesus to wipe his face on the way to his crucifixion. When he gave it back, his features were impressed on it. A ‘veil of Veronica’ seems to have been at Rome since the 8th cent. The legend was probably written in its present form in the 14th cent. to explain the relic. The incident is now devotionally important as the sixth of the stations of the cross. Feast day, 12 July.

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"Veronica, St." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Veronica, St." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved May 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/veronica-st

veronica (Christian relic)

veronica (vərŏn´Ĭkə) [Lat., probably connected with Greek Berenice], relic preserved in St. Peter's Church, Rome. It is said to be a veil that a woman used to wipe the face of Jesus as he was on the way to Calvary. The cloth retained the print of his face. The woman, often called Veronica, is not listed in official calendars of saints. The relic is commonly called Veronica's veil.

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"veronica (Christian relic)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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veronica

veronica (speedwell) Widely distributed genus of annual and perennial plants of the figwort family. The small flowers are white, blue, or pink. Height: 7.5–153cm (3in–5ft). Family Scrophulariaceae; the genus includes about 250 species.

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veronica

veronica1 plant of the genus Veronica. XVI. Obscure use of the name Veronica.

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"veronica." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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veronica (in botany)

veronica, in botany: see figwort.

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veronica

veronica2 see VERNICLE.

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veronica

veronicabicker, clicker, dicker, flicker, kicker, liquor, nicker, picker, pricker, shicker, slicker, snicker, sticker, ticker, tricker, vicar, whicker, Wicca, wicker •bilker, milker, Rilke •blinker, clinker, drinker, finca, freethinker, Glinka, Inca, inker, jinker, shrinker, sinker, Soyinka, stinker, stotinka, thinker, tinker, Treblinka, winker •frisker, whisker •kibitka, Sitka •Cyrenaica • Bandaranaike •perestroika • Baedeker • melodica •Boudicca • trafficker • angelica •replica •basilica, silica •frolicker, maiolica, majolica •bootlicker • res publica • mimicker •Anneka • arnica • Seneca • Lineker •picnicker •electronica, harmonica, Honecker, japonica, Monica, moniker, Salonica, santonica, veronica •Guernica • Africa • paprika •America, erica •headshrinker • Armorica • brassica •Jessica • lip-syncer • fossicker •Corsica •Attica, hepatica, sciatica, viatica •Antarctica • billsticker •erotica, exotica •swastika

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"veronica." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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