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Pink

Pink

Singer

With brightly colored hair and a Philadelphia-bred moxie to match, R&B/pop singer Pink scored multiplatinum success with the release of her first album, Can't Take Me Home, in 2000. Pink's follow-up release in 2001, M!ssundaztood, also earned multiplatinum sales and displayed a rock and blues edginess not present on her more mainstream pop debut. "The first album was a good introduction—it was testing the waters. … I was the lead singer of two punk bands and sang gospel in all-black churches. I wanted this album to represent that," Pink told Rashaun Hall of Billboard magazine about her sophomore release. Adding to the pop star's success was her contribution to the Grammy Award-winning song "Lady Marmalade," which appeared on the Moulin Rouge film soundtrack. Not content to simply provide music for film, Pink stepped onto the big screen in Rollerball in 2002.

Born Alicia (some sources say Alecia) Moore c. 1979 in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pink grew up listening to the music her mother collected: Aretha Franklin, Dionne Warwick, Shirley Murdock, and Donny Hathaway. Her father, a Vietnam veteran and guitarist, introduced her to the music of Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, the Mamas and the Papas, and Billy Joel. "I'd watch him play and we'd sing guitar together," she explained to Julia Chaplin of Interview. "That made me want to make music, because I was a really bad kid, so I was like, ‘Let me just make him proud,’" Pink told Shirley Manson (of the band Garbage) in another conversation for Interview. Pink earned her nickname for the shade her cheeks turn when she gets embarrassed. She later dyed her hair to match, and her pink hairdo became her trademark.

Pink's progression to the charts started early. She started singing with a gospel choir at 13. At 14 she was singing with a local punk band and had recorded her first original song. She scored a weekly spot at a hip-hop club by the time she was 15. She was handpicked to lend her strong voice to an R&B girl group called Basic Instinct, but her bandmates kicked her out "because they were black and I was white," Pink told Chaplin in Interview, "but the politically correct reason that they gave me was because I didn't fit in well in the photos." Although she admitted to having other troubles as a white singer in the traditionally black R&B genre, Pink maintained that "We are all pink on the inside." She then sang for the R&B group Choice, which signed a record deal with the LaFace record label when she was just 16, but the group disbanded before recording. On her way up, Pink dropped out of high school and worked at Pizza Hut, McDonald's, Wendy's, and a gas station.

LaFace kept Pink after Choice dissolved, and paired her with producers and writers like Arista president Antonio "L.A." Reid, Darryl Simmons, Kevin "She'kspeare" Briggs, Babyface, and 112. The result was Pink's debut album, Can't Take Me Home, which made its way onto the American top 40 album charts, fueled by fans who agreed with critic Christopher John Farley in Time: "This 20-year-old's music is better than her name." Despite Entertainment Weekly critic Rob Brunner's review of the album—"there's hardly an original musical moment on it"—Can't Take Me Home earned double-platinum status for sales and produced the top-ten hits "There U Go," "Most Girls," and "You Make Me Sick." She earned an MTV Video Award nomination for Best New Artist.

In 2001 Pink sang on a remake of the 1970s Patti LaBelle hit "Lady Marmalade" for the Moulin Rouge soundtrack with R&B divas Christina Aguilera, Mya, and Lil' Kim. The song featured a sexy video in which the ladies appeared as scantily clad cabaret dancers. "I was the total alien at [sic] that video," Pink told Manson in Interview. The night before the shoot, the young star was so nervous she didn't sleep. "I've always hung with guys and I'm a total tomboy, so I was really nervous," she admitted. The piece was awarded MTV's Best Video of the Year and Best Video from a Film. "Lady Marmalade" became Pink's first number one hit and earned a Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals in 2002.

A New Direction

On her follow-up effort, M!ssundaztood (2001), Pink broke the "record company golden rule," according to Jim Farber of Entertainment Weekly: Don't confuse fans by changing your sound, style, or image. The gamble worked, however, and she successfully became "an entirely different artist." This was not entirely surprising, since as executive producer, Pink had far more control over M!ssundaztood than she had had with her first album. "I'm a songwriter and a musician," she said in an interview with Honey. "I can't be a puppet." Her producers balked at her new direction, but she got her way. "At first," Pink continued, "L.A. Reid thought, ‘She's abandoning her fans.’ But he believed in me. I couldn't have done it without him."

The change was based on her collaboration with former 4 Non Blondes' leader Linda Perry, who co-wrote and co-produced much of the album, and whom Pink had idolized as a young teen. She got Perry's number out of a makeup artist's phone book, went to her house, and within a month had recorded 15 songs. The bonding, writing, and recording process with Perry was "amazing, liberating, inspiring," Pink said in her website biography. Pink told Manson that Perry was "the stepping-stone for my [new sound]," and the reason she had taken artistic control of the album. The critics agreed: "Pink deserves respect for expressing herself instead of going through the teen-pop motions," wrote Rob Sheffield for Rolling Stone.

"I hope this album shocks people who think they know who I am or what I'm about," Pink said in comments included on her official website. She co-wrote many of its songs, producing very personal introspective lyrics on songs like "Don't Let Me Get Me," about self-loathing, and "Family Portrait," about her parents' messy divorce. Critic Smith Galtney wrote in Time Out New York: "Although not quite as great as some reviews would have you believe, M!ssundaztood is still pretty … good." The album's first single, "Get the Party Started," written by Perry, climbed high on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

For the Record …

Born Alicia (some sources say Alecia) Moore c. 1979 in Philadelphia, PA; married Carey Hart, January 7, 2006; separated February 2008.

Began singing with gospel choir, c. 1982; sang with local punk band, recorded first original song, c. 1983; sang weekly at hip-hop club beginning c. 1984; joined Basic Instinct; joined Choice, signed a record deal with the LaFace record label, c. 1985; released Can't Take Me Home, 2000; sang on remake of the 1970s hit "Lady Marmalade" for Moulin Rouge film soundtrack, 2001; released M!ssundaztood, 2001; appeared in film Rollerball, 2002; recorded "Feel Good Time" for Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle and appeared in the film, 2003; released Try This, 2003; issued I'm Not Dead, 2006; toured extensively to support I'm Not Dead, 2006-07; appeared in horror film Catacombs, 2006.

Awards: Billboard magazine, Best New Female Artist, 2000; Grammy Award, Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals, for "Lady Marmalade," 2002; Grammy Award, Best Female Rock Vocal Performance, for "Trouble," 2004; MTV Video Award, Best Pop Video, for "Stupid Girls," 2006.

Addresses: Record company—Arista Records, 6 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. Website—Pink Official Website: http://www.pinkspage.com.

Expanded Her Career

In 2002 Pink began to expand her career into other strata of the entertainment spectrum, making her big-screen debut in Rollerball. She contributed "Feel Good Time" to the feature film Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle midway through 2003, and also had a small cameo in the film. She followed with her third album on November 11, 2003, Try This. "With Try This," wrote Stephen Thomas Erlewine in All Music Guide, "Pink has firmly established a voice of her own, and in doing so, she's made another tremendous modern pop record." While Try This reached number nine on Billboard's top 200, the album sold less well than its predecessor. The album's first single, "Trouble," only climbed to number 68 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart. Try This, however, received a better reception in Britain and Australia, selling over three million copies.

In 2006 Pink issued her fourth album, I'm Not Dead. "This is the third album in a row where she's thrown a curve ball," wrote Erlewine, "confounding expectations by delivering a record that's wilder, stronger, and better than the last. And while that's no guarantee that I'm Not Dead will be a bigger hit than Try This, at least it's proof positive that there are few pop musicians more exciting in the 2000s than Pink." I'm Not Dead rose to number six on the Billboard charts, and the album produced three successful singles, "Stupid Girls," "Who Knew," and "U + Ur Hand." The video for "Stupid Girls" also won notoriety for lambasting celebrities like Paris Hilton, and subsequently won an MTV Music Award for Best Pop Video. Pink supported I'm Not Dead with a major tour in 2006-07 that included dates in Australia, the United States, and Europe. She has also continued her film career, appearing in the horror film Catacombs in 2007.

In 2005 Pink proposed to motocross racer Carey Hart, and the two married in Costa Rica on January 7, 2006. The couple separated in February 2008. Pink is a vegetarian and a supporter of PETA, and has been critical of other performers, including Beyonce, for wearing fur. Speaking of her future as an artist, Pink told Music OMH, "I think one will always be misunderstood. That's the human quest—to be completely understood—but I don't think it happens. But that's the charm and beauty of life. … I think it would be way too comfortable if you felt understood and everything was fine."

Selected discography

Can't Take Me Home, La Face, 2000.

(With Christina Aguilera, Mya, and Lil' Kim) "Lady Marmalade," Moulin Rouge (soundtrack), Interscope, 2001.

M!ssundaztood, Arista, 2001.

Try This, Arista, 2003.

I'm Not Dead, La Face, 2006.

Sources

Periodicals

Billboard, December 1, 2001.

Entertainment Weekly, April 14, 2000, p. 73; November 23, 2001, p. 79.

Honey, March 2002.

Interview, February 2001, p. 109; December 2001, p. 36.

People, November 26, 2001, p. 45.

Popstar, February 2002.

Rolling Stone, December 6-13, 2001.

Stuff, January 2002.

Time, April 17, 2000, p. 84; December 3, 2001, p. 77.

Time Out New York, January 3-10, 2002.

USA Today, November 23, 2001.

Online

"Pink," All Music Guide,http://www.allmusic.com (January 24, 2002; August 3, 2007).

"Pink—Don't Try This at Home," Music OMH,http://www.musicomh.com/interviews/pink.htm (August 3, 2007).

Pink Official Website, http://www.pinkspage.com (January 24, 2002).

Additional materials for this essay were provided by the Arista Records publicity department, 2002.

—Brenna Sanchez and Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr.

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Pink

Pink

Singer

For the Record

Selected discography

Source

With brightly colored hair and a Philadelphia-bred moxie to match, R&B/pop singer Pink scored multiplatinum success with the release of her first album, Cant Take Me Home, in 2000. Pinks follow-up release in 2001, Mlssundaztood, also earned multi-platinum sales and displayed a rock and blues edginess not present on her more mainstream pop debut. The first album was a good introductionit was testing the waters. I was the lead singer of two punk bands and sang gospel in all-black churches. I wanted this album to represent that, Pink told Rashaun Hall of Billboard magazine about her sophomore release. Adding to the pop stars success was her contribution to the Grammy Award-winning song Lady Marmalade, which appeared on the Moulin Rouge film soundtrack. Not content to simply provide music for film, Pink stepped onto the big screen in Rollerball in 2002.

Born Alicia (some sources say Alecia) Moore c. 1979 in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pink grew up listening to the music her mother collected: Aretha Franklin, Dionne Warwick, Shirley Mur-dock, and Donny Hathaway. Her father, a Vietnam veteran and guitarist, introduced her to the music of

For the Record

Born Alicia (some sources say Alecia) Moore c. 1979 in Philadelphia, PA.

Began singing with a gospel choir, c. 1982; sang with a local punk band, recorded first original song, c. 1983; sang weekly at a hip-hop club beginning c. 1984; joined Basic Instinct; joined Choice, signed a record deal with the LaFace record label, c. 1985; released Cant Take Me Home, 2000; sang on a remake of the 1970s hit Lady Marmalade for the Moulin Rouge film soundtrack, 2001; released Mlssundaztood, 2001; appeared in the film Rollerball, 2002.

Awards: Billboard magazine, Best New Female Artist, 2000; Grammy Award, Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for Lady Marmalade, 2002.

Addresses: Record company Arista Records, 6 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. Website Pink Official Website: http://www.pinkspage.com.

Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan, the Mamas and the Papas, and Billy Joel. Id watch him play and wed sing guitar together, she explained to Julia Chaplin of Interview. That made me want to make music, because I was a really bad kid, so I was like, Let me just make him proud, Pink told Shirley Manson (of the band Garbage) in another conversation for Interview. Pink earned her nickname for the shade her cheeks turn when she gets embarrassed. She later dyed her hair to match, and her pink hairdo became her trademark.

Pinks progression to the charts started early. She started singing with a gospel choir at 13. At 14 she was singing with a local punk band and had recorded her first original song. She scored a weekly spot at a hip-hop club by the time she was 15. She was hand-picked to lend her strong voice to an R&B girl group, Basic Instinct, but her bandmates kicked her out because they were black and I was white, Pink told Chaplin in Interview, but the politically correct reason that they gave me was because I didnt fit in well in the photos. Although she has admitted to having other troubles as a white singer in the traditionally black R&B genre, Pink maintains that We are all pink on the inside. She then sang for the R&B group Choice, which signed a record deal with the LaFace record label when she was just 16, but the group disbanded before recording. On her way up, Pink dropped out of high school and worked at Pizza Hut, McDonalds, Wendys, and a gas station.

LaFace kept Pink after Choice dissolved and paired her with producers and writers like Arista president Antonio L.A. Reid, Darryl Simmons, Kevin Shekspeare Briggs, Babyface, and 112. The result was Pinks debut album, Cant Take Me Home, which made its way onto the American top 40 album charts, fueled by fans who agreed with critic Christopher John Farley in Time: this 20-year-olds music is better than her name. Despite Entertainment Weekly critic Rob Brunners review of the albumtheres hardly an original musical moment on itCant Take Me Home earned double-platinum status for sales and produced the topten hits There U Go, Most Girls, and You Make Me Sick. She earned an MTV Video Award nomination for Best New Artist.

In 2001 Pink sang on a remake of the 1970s Patti LaBelle hit Lady Marmalade for the Moulin Rouge soundtrack with R&B divas Christina Aguilera, Mya, and Lil Kim. The song featured a sexy video in which the ladies appeared as scantily clad cabaret dancers. I was the total alien at [sic] that video, Pink told Manson in Interview. The night before the shoot, the young star was so nervous she didnt sleep. Ive always hung with guys and Im a total tomboy, so I was really nervous, she admitted. The piece was named MTVs Best Video of the Year and Best Video from a Film. Lady Marmalade became Pinks first numberone hit and earned the Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals in 2002.

On her follow-up effort Mlssundaztood, released in 2001, Pink broke the record company golden rule, according to Jim Farber of Entertainment Weekly. Dont confuse fans by changing your sound, style, or image. The gamble worked, however, and she successfully became an entirely different artist. This was not entirely surprising, though, since as executive producer Pink had far more control over Mlssundaztood than she had had with her first album. Im a songwriter and a musician, she said in an interview with Honey. I cant be a puppet. Her producers balked at her new direction, but she got her way. At first, Pink continued, L.A. Reid thought, Shes abandoning her fans. But he believed in me. I couldnt have done it without him.

The change was based on her collaboration with former 4 Non Blondes leader Linda Perry, who cowrote and coproduced much of the album, and whom Pink had idolized as a young teen. I loved her. I thought I was her when I was 13, Pink told Manson in Interview. She got Perrys number out of a makeup artists phone book, went to her house, and within a month had recorded 15 songs. The bonding, writing, and recording process with Perry was amazing, liberating, inspiring, Pink said in her website biography, what making music should be like. Pink told Manson that Perry was the stepping-stone for my [new sound], and the reason she had taken artistic control of the album. The critics agreed: Pink deserves respect for expressing herself instead of going through the teen-pop motions, wrote Rob Sheffield for Rolling Stone.

I hope this album shocks people who think they know who I am or what Im about, Pink said in comments included on her official website. Indeed, she cowrote many of its songs, producing very personal, introspective lyricssongs like Dont Let Me Get Me, about self-loathing, and Family Portrait, about her parents messy divorce; when they finally heard the song both cried for days, according to her website. In My Vietnam, she goes over the top, according to Farber in Entertainment Weekly, comparing her own troubles to the war. While the album lack[s] adult depth, Farber continued, Pink captures girlish confusion with greater accuracy and delight than Alanis Morissettes supposed bible of the form, Jagged Little Pill. Critic Smith Galtney wrote in Time Out New York: Although not quite as great as some reviews would have you believe, Mlssundaztoodls still pretty good. The albums first single, Get the Party Started, written by Perry, climbed high on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

In 2002 Pink began to expand her career into other strata of the entertainment spectrum, making her big-screen debut in Rollerball.

Selected discography

Cant Take Me Home, La Face, 2000.

(With Christina Aguilera, Mya, and Lil Kim) Lady Marmalade, Moulin Rouge (soundtrack), Interscope, 2001.

Mlssundaztood, Arista, 2001.

Source

Periodicals

Billboard, December 1, 2001.

Entertainment Weekly, April 14, 2000, p. 73; November 23, 2001, p. 79.

Honey, March 2002.

Interview, February 2001, p. 109; December 2001, p. 36.

People, November 26, 2001, p. 45.

Popstar, February 2002.

Rolling Stone, December 6-13, 2001.

Stuff, January 2002.

Time, April 17, 2000, p. 84; December 3, 2001, p. 77.

Time Out New York, January 3-10, 2002.

USA Today, November 23, 2001.

Online

Pink, All Music Guide, http://www.allmusic.com (January 24, 2002).

Pink Official Website, http://www.pinkspage.com (January 24, 2002).

Additional materials were provided by the Arista Records publicity department, 2002.

Brenna Sanchez

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Pink

PINK

Born: Alecia Moore; Doylestown, Pennsylvania, 8 September 1979

Genre: R&B, Pop, Rock

Best-selling album since 1990: Missundaztood (2001)

Hit songs since 1990: "Get the Party Started," "Just Like a Pill"


After her moderately successful debut album, R&B singer Pink somehow convinced her record company that her image was due for an overhaul. Though a new artist of Pink's caliber and age generally doesn't have much sway, the teenage singer prevailed, switching from the girlish R&B pop singer of Can't Take Me Home (2000), to the edgy, confessional pop rocker of Missundaztood (2002), a transition that gained her a massive audience and indelible pop hits with songs such as "Get the Party Started" and "Just Like a Pill."

Pink was born Alecia Moore in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, a small town just outside of Philadelphia. At thirteen, the singerwho had adopted the childhood name Pink as a professional moniker either as a result of her dyed pink hair or a childhood incident in which she had her pants pulled down and her cheeks blushed pinkbegan rapping with her friend Skratch's local rap group, Schools of Thought.

After seeing the fourteen-year-old singer perform her weekly five-minute set at Philadelphia's Club Fever, an MCA Records representative tapped Pink to complete the line-up of the short-lived R&B girl group Basic Instinct. After the dissolution of the group, Pink was asked to complete the three-singer line up of yet another girl group, Choice, signed to LaFace Records.

Choice, too, would flounder, but the relationship with LaFace would not, eventually bringing Pink to the attention of the label's co-founder, "L.A." Reid, thanks to her songwriting skills. As a girl, Pink had been turned on to folksingers such as Bob Dylan and Don McLean by her guitar-playing father, James, and the songwriting bug had never left her. Reid paired Pink with producer Daryl Simmons, who asked the singer to write a chorus for the song "Just to Be Loving You," which rekindled Pink's interest in songwriting.

Reid signed Pink to LaFace as a solo artist and placed her in the studio with his partner, Babyface, and Simmons, who helped shape the singer's solo debut, Can't Take Me Home. The album, on which Pink co-wrote half the tracks, sold more than half a million copies thanks to the hit "There You Go," a brassy kiss-off to a former boyfriend. Songs such as "Split Personality" and "Hell Wit Ya" are classic late-1990s R&B, imbued with thumping machinelike beats, thick bass lines, and a sprinkling of hip-hop slang.

The album established Pink alongside such teenage pop singers as Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera, as well as edgier R&B artists such as TLC and Kelis, but, thanks to her cropped pink hair, tattoos, and street-inspired sartorial style, Pink's image was less refined than that of her peers. A mix of skateboarder, techno raver, and rocker, the somewhat tepid music on the album failed to live up to Pink's wild child image.

Teaming with Mya, Lil' Kim, and Christina Aguilera, Pink was part of one of the biggest worldwide pop hits of 2001, a remake of Patti LaBelle's "Lady Marmalade," from the soundtrack to the film Moulin Rouge. In the video, the quartet are dressed in risqué lingerie, with Pink emerging as the flashiest, most alluring member of the impromptu supergroup; the song won a 2002 Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals. It was the beginning of a career makeover that would put Pink securely in her element.

Taking Control and Bursting into Superstardom

True to her rock roots, Pink teamed with her musical hero, ex-4 Non Blondes singer Linda Perrywho had a semi-hit with the 1993 rock song "What's Up?"to write half of the songs for Missundaztood. The Perry-penned disco pop anthem, "Get the Party Started," exploded onto the charts upon its release. Even though critics called it pure ear candy, Pink's vocals are noticeably more raw and the production is more progressive than the songs on the singer's debut.

The songs on Missundaztood are noticeably more personal, none more so than the hit dance rock song "Don't Let Me Get Me." The litany of personality flaws and life lessons ("Everyday I fight a war against the mirror / Can't take the person staring back at me / I'm a hazard to myself ") includes a line in which Pink complains about being compared to Britney Spears and a section in which she playfully chides boss Reid about his career advice ("L.A. told me / You'll be a pop star / All you have to change / Is everything you are.") With more rock guitars, guest appearances from Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler and Bon Jovi guitarist Richie Sambora, as well as songs about her struggles as a hell-raising child, Missundaztood clicked with fans, selling more than 4 million copies.

Pink celebrated her liberation by touring as an opening act for retro rocker Lenny Kravitz during the summer of 2000 and, in the fall, recording a song for the soundtrack to Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle (2003), as well as filming a cameo for the film.

At the tender age of nineteen, music industry newcomer Pink took hold of her career and stopped being the person her handlers told her to be. The results were a hit R&B/rock album and rebel girl image that connected with millions of fans and secured a second chapter to Alecia Moore's story.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Can't Take Me Home (Arista, 2000); Missundaztood (Arista, 2002).

WEBSITE:

www.pinkspage.com.

gil kaufman

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pink

pink, common name for some members of the Caryophyllaceae, a family of small herbs found chiefly in north temperate zones (especially the Mediterranean area) but with several genera indigenous to south temperate zones and high altitudes of tropical mountains. Plants of this family typically have stems that are swollen at the nodes and notched, or "pinked," petals ranging in color from white to pink, red, and purple. The family includes several ornamentals and many wildflowers and weeds, many of them European species now widely naturalized elsewhere.

Ornamental Pinks

Ornamental pinks include the spicily fragrant flowers of the large genus Dianthus, an Old World group including the carnation (D. caryophyllus), sweet William (D. barbatus), Deptford pink (D. armeria), and most other flowers called dianthus or pink (some of the latter belong to other genera of the family). In over 2,000 years of cultivation (the name Dianthus was mentioned by Theophrastus c.300 BC) the carnation has given rise to about 2,000 varieties, all derived from the single-flowered, flesh-colored clove pink, known in Elizabethan times as gillyflower. Formerly added to wine and beer as a flavoring, it is now used in perfumery. The sweet William bears its blossoms in dense clusters; wild sweet William, an American wildflower, is an unrelated species of the phlox family. The most popular ornamental pinks—the maiden pink (D. deltoides) and especially varieties of the garden, or grass, pink (D. plumarius)—have escaped from cultivation and now grow wild in the United States. This is true also of other ornamentals, e.g., the ragged robin, or cuckoo flower (Lychnis flos-cuculi), the bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis), and the baby's breath (Gypsophila paniculata). The ragged robin was once known as crowflower; it was probably the crowflower used by Ophelia in her garland (Shakespeare's Hamlet). The bouncing Bet, cultivated in colonial America, is the best-known American soap plant; it is also called soapwort, as are other species of the genus. The baby's breath is an unusual member of the family in being a bushy plant; it is much used as a bouquet filler.

Wildflowers

Wildflowers of the family that have indigenous American species include the pearlworts (genus Sagina), sandworts (Arenaria), campions and catchflies (species of several genera, especially Lychnis and the widespread Silene), sand spurries (Spergularia), and chickweeds (species of several genera, e.g., Stellaria and Cerastium). Chickweed, relished by birds, is sometimes used for greens and for poultices; catchflies (e.g., Silene virginica of the E United States, also called fire pink) are named for the fringed teeth or claws of their deeply lobed petals. The common chickweed (Stellaria media), the moss campion (Silene acaulis), and the common spurry (Spergula arvensis) are now nearly cosmopolitan weeds, having spread from parts of the Old World. Spurry, cultivated in Europe as a pasture, hay, and cover crop, is sometimes planted to hold sand in place.

Classification

Pinks are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, family Caryophyllaceae.

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pink

pink1 / pingk/ • adj. 1. of a color intermediate between red and white, as of coral or salmon: her healthy pink cheeks bright pink lipstick. ∎  (of wine) rosé. 2. inf., often derog. having or showing left-wing tendencies: pale pink politics. 3. of or associated with homosexuals: a boom in the pink economy. • n. 1. pink color or pigment. ∎  pink clothes or material: she looks good in pink. ∎  (also hunting pink) the red clothing or material worn by fox hunters. 2. a pink thing, such as a rosé wine. 3. the best condition or degree: the economy is not in the pink of health. 4. inf., often derog. a person with left-wing tendencies. See also pinko. • v. [intr.] blush, as from embarrassment: I tried to hide my embarrassment, but I think I must have pinked a bit. PHRASES: in the pink inf. in very good health and spirits. turn (or go) pink blush.DERIVATIVES: pink·ish adj. pink·ly adv. pink·ness n. pink·y adj. pink2 • n. a herbaceous Eurasian plant (genus Dianthus) with sweet-smelling pink or white flowers and slender, typically gray-green leaves. The pink family (Caryophyllaceae) includes the campions, chickweeds, stitchworts, and the cultivated carnations. pink3 • v. [tr.] 1. cut a scalloped or zigzag edge on. ∎  pierce or nick (someone) slightly with a weapon or missile. 2. archaic decorate: April pinked the earth with flowers. pink4 • n. hist. a small square-rigged sailing ship, typically with a narrow, overhanging stern. pink5 • n. dated a yellowish lake pigment made by combining vegetable coloring matter with a white base.

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"pink." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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pink

pink2 of a colour intermediate between red and white, as of coral or salmon. The word comes (in the mid 17th century) from pink1, the early use of the adjective being to describe the colour of the flowers of this plant.

Politically, pink is used as a mildly derogatory informal term for a person of left-wing tendencies.
pink elephants hallucinations supposedly typical of those experienced by a person who is drunk.
pink pound a term for the perceived buying power of homosexuals as a consumer group, recognized in the 1980s; by the 1990s, the pink economy was seen as a substantial element of the business world.
pink triangle a triangular piece of pink cloth sewn on to clothing to identify homosexual men in Nazi concentration camps; in later use, a symbol indicating support for homosexual freedom and rights.
Pink 'Un the informal name for the Sporting Times (1865–1931), which from April 1876 was printed on pink paper.

See also sky-blue pink.

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"pink." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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pink

pink1 a plant with sweet-smelling pink or white flowers and slender, typically grey-green leaves. The name may be short for pink eye, literally ‘small or half-shut eye’; compare with the synonymous French word oeillet, literally ‘little eye’.

In figurative usage, pink denotes the finest example of excellence, as in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, ‘I am the very pink of courtesy’; from this developed in the pink of condition to denote the best possible state of health and spirits.

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pink

pink Common name for several genera of the pink family (Caryophyllaceae), especially the genus Dianthus of more than 300 species, most of which are native to the Mediterranean region. Short, herbaceous perennials, many are hardy evergreens with showy, fragrant flowers. Leaves are simple and usually opposite, and the symmetrical flowers are usually bisexual. See also carnation

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"pink." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pink." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pink

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pink

pink2 species of Dianthus; fig. finest ‘flower’, embodied excellence of XVI; adj. of a pale red colour XVIII; hence sb. pink colour XIX. perh. short for †pink eye (see PINK-EYED).

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"pink." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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pink

pink3 intr. and tr. prick, pierce XIV; ornament (cloth, etc.) by cutting holes in it. (later) ornament with scalloped edges, etc. XVI. perh. of LG. or Du. orig. (cf. LG. pinken strike, peck).

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pink

pink1 (small flatbottomed) sailing vessel. XV. — MDu. pin(c)ke, small seagoing vessel, fishingboat; of unkn. orig.

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pink

pink See DIANTHUS.

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"pink." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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pink

pinkankh, bank, blank, clank, crank, dank, drank, embank, flank, franc, frank, hank, lank, outflank, outrank, Planck, plank, point-blank, prank, rank, sank, shank, shrank, spank, stank, swank, tank, thank, wank, yank •sandbank • piggy bank • mountebank •fog bank • mudbank • Bundesbank •databank • riverbank • Burbank •greenshank • sheepshank •scrimshank • Cruikshank •think tank • Franck • Eysenck •bethink, blink, brink, chink, cinque, clink, dink, drink, fink, Frink, gink, ink, interlink, jink, kink, link, mink, pink, plink, prink, rink, shrink, sink, skink, slink, stink, sync, think, wink, zinc •rinky-dink • Humperdinck • iceblink •cufflink • bobolink • Maeterlinck •lip-sync • countersink • doublethink •kiddiewink •tiddlywink (US tiddledywink) •hoodwink

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