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dove

dove this bird is traditionally a symbol of peace.

In Christian art, a dove often stands for the Holy Spirit, as in Luke 3:22, in the account of Jesus being baptized by John in Jordan, ‘And the Holy Spirit descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him.’ The dove in biblical terms is also associated with an olive branch as a messenger of peace and deliverance, as in the account in Genesis 8:8–12, of the dove sent out from the ark by Noah, which returned from its second flight with an olive leaf in its beak, ‘so Noah knew that the waters were abated from the earth’.

A dove is the emblem of St Ambrose, St David, St Gregory, and the Welsh-born St Samson, 6th-century bishop of Dol in Brittany.

In 20th century political usage, a dove is a person who (unlike a hawk) advocates peaceful or conciliatory policies, especially in foreign affairs.

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"dove." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dove." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove

"dove." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove

Dove

Dove. A bird of the pigeon family. Much symbolism is focused on the dove which ancient natural history (wrongly) regarded as a gentle and humble bird, noted for its fidelity. As the bird that returned to the ark with an olive-branch, it is a symbol of peace (cf. Genesis 8. 11); as the bird that descended on Christ at his baptism, it is a symbol of the Holy Spirit (cf. Mark 1. 10). The dove is also a symbol of the Church, the faithful human soul, or divine inspiration. The ‘eucharistic dove’ was a popular vessel in medieval Europe for the reservation of the Blessed Sacrament.

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"Dove." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Dove." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove

"Dove." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove

dove

dove1 / dəv/ • n. 1. a stocky seed- or fruit-eating bird of the pigeon family, with a small head, short legs, and a cooing voice. 2. a person who advocates peaceful or conciliatory policies, esp. in foreign affairs.Compare with hawk1 (sense 2). DERIVATIVES: dove·like / -ˌlīk/ adj. dov·ish adj. (in sense 2). dove2 / dōv/ • past of dive.

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"dove." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dove." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove-1

"dove." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove-1

Dove (river, England)

Dove (dŭv), river, c.40 mi (60 km) long, rising in the Pennines, Derbyshire, central England, and flowing S and SE to the River Trent near Burton upon Trent. It forms much of the Derbyshire-Staffordshire boundary. Its watercourse was a haunt of Izaak Walton and still provides fishing. The rocky and wood-bordered Dovedale, below Hartington, is celebrated by artists and poets.

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"Dove (river, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Dove (river, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dove-river-england

dove

dove Cooing, plump-bodied bird found almost worldwide. Doves are related to pigeons, and have small heads, short legs and dense, varied plumage. They feed mostly on vegetable matter. Length: 15–83cm (6–33in). Family Columbidae.

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"dove." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/dove

dove

dove XII. ME. d(o)uve, dofe — ON. dúfa = OS. dūba (Du. duif), OHG. tūba (G. taube), Goth. dūbō :- Gmc. *dūbōn.

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"dove." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"dove." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove-2

dove (in zoology)

dove: see pigeon.

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dove

dovebehove, clove, cove, dove, drove, fauve, grove, interwove, Jove, mauve, rove, shrove, stove, strove, trove, wove •alcove • mangrove •above, dove, glove, guv, love, shove, tug-of-love •ringdove • turtle dove • foxglove

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"dove." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"dove." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dove-0