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Negev

NEGEV

desert region in southern half of israel; northeastern extension of the sinai desert.

The Negev is a triangular area with a maximum elevation of 3,300 feet and includes more than half of Israel's land area. The Negev Hills are a series of ranges with gentle northwesterly and steep south-easterly slopes. Some craters were formed by the erosion of upward-folded strata; they are 6 to 19 miles long, up to 3 miles wide, and surrounded on all sides by precipitous slopes. On their eastern side is an opening through which they drain into the Aravah Valley. August temperatures average 79°F, but they reach 90°F in the southern area and in Aravah. January temperatures average 52°F, reaching 59°F in the south and in Elat. The gateway from the north is the Negev's largest city, Beersheba, with a population estimated at 181,500 in 2002. To the south, the Negev opens onto the Gulf of Aqaba at Elat. The Negev has been irrigated in the northwest for agriculture; it contains some mineral resources, such as copper, phosphates, bromine, and potash, as well as natural gas and petroleum.

Under the British Mandate (19221948), the Negev was inhabited mainly by Bedouin. A few Jewish settlements were established by 1946. Control of the desert was contested by Arabs and Jews in the various partition plans. In 1947, the United Nations General Assembly's partition recommendation assigned parts of the Negev to the proposed Jewish state. In May 1948, Egyptian forces entered Gaza and the Negev in the opening days of the Arab-Israel War. With the conclusion of that war by armistice agreement in 1949, the Negev remained part of Israel. The late 1940s and early 1950s brought hundreds of thousands of immigrants to Israel. With an aggressive settlement program, by 2000 the Negev reached a population of more than 300,000.

see also arabisrael war (1948).


Bibliography


Gradus, Yehuda, et al. Atlas of the Negev. Jerusalem: Ben Gurion University of the Negev, 1986.

Levinson, Ester, and Yehuda, Gradus. Statistical Yearbook of the Negev. Beersheba: Negev Center for Regional Development and Negev Development Authority, 2000.

elizabeth thompson
updated by yehuda gradus

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"Negev." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Encyclopedia.com. 30 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Negev." Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. . Retrieved May 30, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/negev

Negev

Negev (nĕg´ĕv) or Negeb (nĕg´ĕb) [Heb.,=dry], hilly desert region of S Israel, c.5,140 sq mi (13,310 sq km), bordered by the Judaean Hills, the Wadi Arabah, the Sinai peninsula, and the narrow Mediterranean coastal plain; it comprises more than one half of Israel's land area. The Negev receives c.2 to 4 in. (5–10 cm) of rain annually. In the Beersheba basin, NW Negev, there are fertile loess deposits, but the region's aridity prevented cultivation until irrigation was provided by the National Water Carrier Project, which taps the Sea of Galilee. The Negev region also has a good mineral potential; copper, phosphates, and natural gas are already commercially extracted. In ancient times there were several prosperous cities along the principal wadis (watercourses) of the area. In modern times the Negev was the scene of much fighting between Egyptian and Israeli forces after the partition of Palestine in 1948. Many kibbutzim (see collective farm) are located in the Negev; dry farming has been attempted in some areas. The major cities in the region include Beersheba, Dimona, Arad, and Elat.

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"Negev." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 30 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Negev." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 30, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/negev

Negev

Negev (Hebrew, dry) Desert region in s Israel that extends from Beersheba to the border with Egypt at Elat, and accounts for more than 50% of Israeli land. An irrigation network has increased cultivation in the Negev. The region has good mineral resources, including copper, phosphates, natural gas, gypsum, and magnesium ore. Area: c.13,300sq km (5130sq mi).

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"Negev." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 30 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Negev

Negev •rev • Mendeleev • Negev • maglev •Brezhnev

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"Negev." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 30, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/negev