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witch

witch a person, typically a woman, who practises magic or sorcery and was traditionally thought to have evil magic powers; such witches are popularly depicted as wearing a black cloak and pointed hat, and flying on a broomstick, and are associated with Halloween.

In the Middle Ages and the 16th and 17th centuries, witchcraft was a capital offence and there were numerous trials and executions of suspected witches; sometimes a whole community became involved, as in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692.

In the 20th century, the term witch is now used also for a follower or practitioner of modern witchcraft; a Wiccan priest or priestess.
witch ball a ball of decorated, typically coloured or silvered blown glass, originally used as a charm against witchcraft.
witch doctor among tribal peoples, a magician credited with powers of healing, divination, and protection against the magic of others.
witch-hunt a search for and subsequent persecution of a supposed witch; a campaign directed against a person or group holding unorthodox or unpopular views.
Witch of Endor in the Bible, the woman who with the help of her familiar spirit conjured up the spirit of the dead prophet Samuel for Saul. She is taken as a type of this kind of divination.

See also white witch, witches, witching.

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"witch." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"witch." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch

"witch." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch

witch

witch / wich/ • n. 1. a woman thought to have evil magic powers. Witches are popularly depicted as wearing a black cloak and pointed hat, and flying on a broomstick. ∎  a follower or practitioner of modern witchcraft; a Wiccan priest or priestess. ∎ inf. an ugly or unpleasant old woman; a hag. ∎  a girl or woman capable of enchanting or bewitching a man. 2. an edible North Atlantic flatfish (Glyptocephalus cynoglossus, family Pleuronectidae) that is of some commercial value. • v. [tr.] (of a witch) cast an evil spell on: Mrs. Mucharski had somehow witched the house. ∎  (of a girl or woman) enchant (a man): she witched Jake. DERIVATIVES: witch·like / -ˌlīk/ adj. witch·y adj.

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"witch." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"witch." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch-1

"witch." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch-1

witch

witch OE. wiċċe, fem. corr. to wiċċa male magician, sorcerer, wizard, rel. to wiċċian practise magic arts, corr. to (M)LG. wikken, wicken; of unkn. orig.
Hence witchcraft OE. wiċċecræft.

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"witch." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"witch." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch-2

witch

witchbewitch, bitch, ditch, enrich, fitch, flitch, glitch, hitch, itch, kitsch, Mitch, pitch, quitch, rich, snitch, stitch, switch, titch, twitch, which, witch •Redditch • Greenwich • eldritch •ostrich • backstitch • hemstitch •topstitch • Shostakovich • tsarevich •Sandwich •dipswitch, Ipswich

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"witch." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"witch." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/witch-0