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Omer

Omer (Heb., ‘sheaf’). An offering brought to the Temple on 16 Nisan in the Jewish religion. By extension ‘Omer’ became the name of the period between Passover and Shavuʿot. Traditionally the days of the omer are ones of semimourning which is associated with a plague that struck the disciples of R. Akiva (B. Yev. 62b). Lag Ba-Omer is celebrated on the thirty-third day, but the origins of this minor festival are obscure.

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"Omer." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Omer." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/omer

"Omer." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/omer

Omer

Omer in Judaism, a sheaf of corn or omer of grain presented as an offering on the second day of Passover; the period of 49 days between this day and Pentecost. The name comes from Hebrew ῾ōmer, an ancient Hebrew dry measure, the tenth part of an ephah.

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"Omer." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Omer." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/omer

"Omer." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/omer