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Ādi Granth

Ādi Granth (Pañjābī, ‘first volume’, the second being Dasam Granth, i.e. ‘tenth book’). Sikh scriptures. The Ādi Granth is usually called the Gurū Granth Sāhib in recognition that it is the embodiment of the Gurū. Sikhs also call it Gurbāṇī (the Gurū's utterance). They believe that before his death Gurū Gobind Siṅgh declared the Ādi Granth his successor. The Ardās concludes with the injunction ‘Gurū mānio granth’ (‘acknowledge the Granth as Gurū’). Any room in which the Ādi Granth is appropriately installed is a gurdwārā. The scriptures are treated with the same detailed devotion as would be shown to a human Gurū—e.g. a chaurī is waved over it and the volume is ceremonially laid to rest at night.

The Ādi Granth consists of 1,430 pages, each copy having standard page length and numbering.

The contents are metrical and, excepting the opening Japjī, are intended for singing.

Despite the diversity of authorship and language, the message of the Ādi Granth is unanimous: salvation depends not upon caste, ritual, or asceticism, but upon constant meditation on God's name (nām) and immersement in his being:

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"Ādi Granth." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Ādi Granth." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/adi-granth

Adi Granth

Adi Granth the principal sacred scripture of Sikhism. Originally compiled under the direction of Arjan Dev (1563–1606), the fifth Sikh guru, it contains hymns and religious poetry as well as the teachings of the first five gurus. Successive gurus added to the text: the tenth and last guru, Gobind Singh (1666–1708), declared that henceforth there would be no more gurus, the Adi Granth taking their place.

The name comes from Sanskrit ādigrantha, literally ‘first book’, based on grantha ‘literary composition’, from granth ‘to tie’.

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"Adi Granth." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Adi Granth." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/adi-granth

"Adi Granth." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/adi-granth

Adi Granth

Adi Granth (Hindi, ‘First Book’) Principal sacred text of Sikhism. The preachings of the first five Sikh Gurus were collected by Guru Arjan (1536–1606), the fifth Guru, and the text was expanded by the tenth Guru, Gobind Singh. Gobind Singh declared that he was the last Guru, and the book retitled Granth Sahib (Hindi, ‘Revered Book’).

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"Adi Granth." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Adi Granth." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/adi-granth-0