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Transubstantiation

Transubstantiation. In Catholic theology of the eucharist, the change of the substance (underlying reality) of the bread and wine into the substance of the body and blood of Christ, leaving the ‘accidents’ (i.e. the appearances of the bread and wine) intact, so that the faithful do not literally touch Christ's body. The term was recognized at the Lateran Council of 1215, and was formally defined at Trent in 1551. The E. Church entertains an essentially identical doctrine to transubstantiation, but many modern Orthodox theologians avoid the term because of its associations with Latin scholasticism.

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"Transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation

"Transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation

transubstantiation

transubstantiation Belief accepted by the Roman Catholic Church that, during the prayer of consecration at the Mass (the Eucharist), the ‘substance’ of the bread and wine is changed into the ‘substance’ of the body and blood of Jesus Christ, while the ‘accidents’ (the outward forms of bread and wine) remain unchanged. The doctrine was defined at the Lateran Council of 1215. The definition involving ‘substance’ and ‘accidents’ was rejected by the architects of the Reformation.

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"transubstantiation." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"transubstantiation." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transubstantiation

transubstantiation

transubstantiation the conversion of the substance of the Eucharistic elements into the body and blood of Christ at consecration, only the appearances of bread and wine still remaining. The belief was defined at the Lateran Council of 1215, based on Aristotelian theories on the nature of ‘substance’, and is the official doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church; the word itself has been used from the mid 16th century. It was rejected by Luther, Zwingli, and other Protestant reformers.

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"transubstantiation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transubstantiation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation

"transubstantiation." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation

transubstantiation

tran·sub·stan·ti·a·tion / ˌtransəbˌstanchēˈāshən/ • n. Christian Theol. (esp. in the Roman Catholic Church) the conversion of the substance of the Eucharistic elements into the body and blood of Christ at consecration, only the appearances of bread and wine still remaining. ∎ formal a change in the form or substance of something.

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"transubstantiation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transubstantiation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation-0

"transubstantiation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation-0

transubstantiation

transubstantiation change of substance XIV; spec. of the Eucharistic bread and wine XVI. — medL. tran(s)substantiātiō, -ōn-, f. tran(s)substantiāre, whence transubstantiate XVI (as pp. XV); see -ATE2, -ATE3, -ATION.
Hence consubstantiation controversialist's term to designate the Lutheran doctrine of the Eucharistic presence in, with, and under the substantially unaltered bread and wine. XVI. See CON-.

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"transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation-1

"transubstantiation." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/transubstantiation-1

transubstantiation

transubstantiation: see Eucharist.

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"transubstantiation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"transubstantiation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transubstantiation

"transubstantiation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/transubstantiation