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Gospel

Gospel [M.E.,=good news; evangel from Gr.,= good news], a written account of the life of Jesus. Though the Gospels of the New Testament are all anonymous, since the 2d cent. they have been named Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. The first three are called Synoptic Gospels because they agree in much of their subject matter, wording, and narrative order and so appear to be written from a common vantage point. Some Pseudepigrapha—e.g., the Gospel of Thomas—partly resemble the canonical Gospels. The solemn reading of the day's Gospel is a special feature of the liturgy in many churches. Formerly the Gospel (i.e., a book of the Gospels) was used instead of the Bible for the oath in courts in Christian countries. This sort of honor paid to the book resulted in some outstanding examples of illumination—e.g., the Lindisfarne Gospels (see Holy Island) and the Book of Kells (see under Ceanannus Mór). Sometimes the term "gospel" is used in a broader sense to indicate the Christian message of salvation.

See J. B. Green, How to Read the Gospels and Acts (1987); R. Price, Three Gospels (1996).

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"Gospel." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Gospel." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/gospel

gospel

gospel the ‘good tidings’ proclaimed by Jesus Christ; any of the four books written by the Evangelists; portion of any of these read at the Eucharist OE.; something ‘as true as the gospel’ XIII; something ‘to swear by’ as doctrine to be believed XVII. OE. gōdspel, i.e. gōd GOOD, spel news, tidings (SPELL1 ), rendering of ecclL. bona annuntiatio, bonus nuntius, used as literal renderings of ecclL. evangelium, Gr. euaggélion EVANGEL. Identification of the first syll. with God in Eng. is reflected in forms adopted in the Gmc. langs. of peoples evangelized from England, viz. OS. godspell, OHG. gotspell, ON. guð-, goðspjall.
Hence gospeller (which illustrates various uses of -ER1), OE. gōdspellere, f. gōdspel or the corr. vb. gōdspellian, †one of the four evangelists (OE.-XVII); †gospel-book XV; one who recites the Gospel at the Eucharist; one who professes the faith of the gospel, esp. fanatically (hot-gospeller) XVI.

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"gospel." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"gospel." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel-2

"gospel." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel-2

Gospel

Gospel the record of Christ's life and teaching in the first four books of the New Testament; each of these books. The four Gospels ascribed to St Matthew, St Mark, St Luke, and St John all give an account of the ministry, crucifixion, and resurrection of Christ, though the Gospel of John differs greatly from the other three. There are also several apocryphal gospels of later date.

The word comes from Old English gōdspel ‘good news’, translating ecclesiastical Latin bona annuntiatio used to gloss evangelium, from Greek euangelion ‘good news’; after the vowel was shortened in Old English, the first syllable was mistaken for godGod’.
Gospel side in a church, the north side of the altar, at which the Gospel is read, opposite to the Epistle side.
gospel truth what is absolutely true (the related take something for gospel is also found).

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"Gospel." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Gospel." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel

"Gospel." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel

gospel

gos·pel / ˈgäspəl/ • n. 1. the teaching or revelation of Christ: it is the Church's mission to preach the gospel. ∎  (also gospel truth) a thing that is absolutely true: they say it's sold out, but don't take that as gospel. ∎  a set of principles or beliefs: the new economics unit has produced what it reckons to be the approved gospel. 2. (Gospel) the record of Jesus' life and teaching in the first four books of the New Testament. ∎  each of these books. ∎  a portion from one of these read at a church service. 3. (also gospel music) a fervent style of black American evangelical religious singing, developed from spirituals sung in Southern Baptist and Pentecostal churches: [as adj.] gospel singers.

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"gospel." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"gospel." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 19, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel-1

"gospel." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel-1

Gospel

Gospel (Gk., euangelion; OE, godspel, ‘good news’).
1. The content of Christian preaching.

2. A book containing sayings and stories of Jesus. Since there was only one Good News, the four separate gospels in the New Testament were distinguished as ‘according to’ Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

3. The reading from the gospels in the Christian eucharist.

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"Gospel." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Gospel." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved August 19, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gospel

gospel

gospel Central content of the Christian faith, the good news (god spell in Old English) that human sins are forgiven and that all sinners are redeemed. The first four books of the New Testament, ascribed to the Evangelists Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, are known as the four Gospels.

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gospel

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"gospel." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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