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tithe

tithe. The payment, originally in kind, of a tenth of the produce of land was at first a voluntary religious duty for the benefit of the poor, pilgrims, and churches, but by the 10th cent. it was compulsory, replacing the old church-scot for the maintenance of the church and clergy, and enforceable with heavy penalties, perhaps the loss of nine-tenths of annual income and later even excommunication. When lords built private churches on their land, tithe, at first still payable to the original church, soon went to the lord's family with only a portion to the priest. Similarly in parishes appropriated to a monastery, tithe was paid to the monastery and after the dissolution to their lay successors. With the spread of protestant nonconformity in the 17th cent., the payment of tithe became extremely contentious, leading to innumerable lawsuits. Resentment of tithe was still a factor in the Swing riots of 1830 and the Rebecca riots in south Wales in 1842–3. By the Tithe Commutation Act (1836) all tithe was commuted to rent-charges. Acts of 1918 and 1925 led to full, compulsory redemption of rent charges, which through the 1936 Tithe Act were replaced by redemption annuities, the crown issuing redemption stock to tithe owners with final extinction after 60 years (1996). Capital loss to the church by this Act was c. £17.7 million. In Scotland, tithes were known as teinds.

Revd Dr William M. Marshall

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"tithe." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tithe." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tithe

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Tithes

Tithes

Judaism

(Heb., maʿaser). Money or goods levied for the maintaining of sacral institutions. Several types of tithe are mentioned in the Hebrew scriptures. According to Numbers 18. 24, the ‘first tithe’ was given to the Levites after the ‘heave-offering’ (terumah) had been separated from it for the priest. The ‘second tithe’ (Leviticus 27. 30–1; Deuteronomy 14. 22–6) was a tenth part of the ‘first tithe’. The laws of tithes are compiled in the tractate Maʿaserot in the Mishnah.

Christianity

In Europe a system of tithes came into legal force in the early Middle Ages (e.g. in England in 900), as a tax for the support of the Church and relief of the poor. The levy consisted of a tenth part, originally of the produce of lands (‘praedial’ tithes) and later of the profits of labour also (‘personal’ tithes). The system did not survive the secularization of continental European states after the Reformation.

For regulated giving in other religions, see ZAKĀT; DASWANDH.

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"Tithes." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Tithes." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved July 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tithes

tithe

tithe / tī[voicedth]/ • n. one tenth of annual produce or earnings, formerly taken as a tax for the support of the church and clergy. ∎  (in certain religious denominations) a tenth of an individual's income pledged to the church. ∎  [in sing.] archaic a tenth of a specified thing: he hadn't said a tithe of the prayers he knew. • v. [tr.] pay or give as a tithe: he tithes 10 percent of his income to the church. ∎ hist. subject to a tax of one tenth of income or produce. DERIVATIVES: tith·a·ble adj. ORIGIN: Old English tēotha (adjective in the ordinal sense ‘tenth,’ used in a specialized sense as a noun), tēothian (verb).

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"tithe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tithe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tithe-1

"tithe." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tithe-1

Tithing

TITHING

In Western ecclesiastical law, the act of paying a percentage of one's income to further religious purposes. One of the political subdivisions of England that was composed of ten families who held freehold estates.

Residents of a tithing were joined in a society and bound to the king to maintain peaceful relations with each other. The person responsible for the administration of the tithing was called the tithing-man; he was a forerunner of the constable.

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"Tithing." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tithe

tithe adj. (arch.) tenth OE.; sb. tenth part of annual produce paid to the Church XII; tenth part XVI. OE. tēoða, contr. of teogoða, ME. tiʒ(e)þe, tīþe; see TENTH.
Hence tithe vb. OE. tēoðian, teogoðian grant a tithe of. So tithing (-ING1) church tithe; company orig. of ten householders in the system of frankpledge. OE. (Angl.) tīġeðing; (WS.) tēoðung.

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"tithe." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tithe

tithe Tax of one-tenth of income levied to support a religious institution. Tithes were prescribed in the Old Testament and were a major source of Church income in medieval Europe. They were largely abandoned in the 19th century.

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"tithe." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tithe

tithe one tenth of annual produce or earnings, formerly taken as a tax for the support of the Church and clergy. The practice derived from Jewish custom, as recorded in Jacob's vow at Bethel, Genesis 28:22.

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"tithe." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tithe

titheblithe, lithe, scythe, tithe, writhe

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"tithe." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tithing

tithing •pennyfarthing • plaything •silversmithing • anything •everything • northing • nothing •something • rebirthing • farthing •scathing • sheathing •tithing, writhing •southing • clothing • underclothing •Worthing • carving • woodcarving •delving •craving, engraving, paving, raving, saving, shaving •self-deceiving, unbelieving, weaving •living, misgiving, thanksgiving, unforgiving •skydiving • piledriving • coving •approving, reproving, unmoving •unloving •Irving, serving, unswerving •time-serving • lapwing • waxwing •batwing • redwing • lacewing •beeswing • forewing • downswing •outswing • viewing • upswing •underwing • phrasing • stargazing •trailblazing • hellraising • unpleasing •rising, surprising •self-aggrandizing • uncompromising •unpatronizing • uprising •enterprising • appetizing •Dowsing, housing •unimposing •amusing, confusing, musing

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