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Chaos

Chaos (kā´ōs), in Greek religion and mythology, vacant, unfathomable space. From it arose all things, earthly and divine. There are various legends explaining it. In one version, Eurynome rose out of Chaos and created all things. In another, Gaea sprang from Chaos and was the mother of all things. Eventually the word chaos came to mean a great confusion of matter out of which a supreme being created all life.

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chaos

chaos The phenomena of apparently random behavior generated by simple deterministic systems. An essential hallmark of chaos in nonlinear systems is the extreme sensitivity of the system to initial conditions.

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"chaos." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"chaos." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chaos