Skip to main content
Select Source:

Paley, Edward Graham

Paley, Edward Graham (1823–95). English architect, a pupil of Edmund Sharpe (1809–77), with whom he was in practice 1845–51 as Sharpe & Paley. From 1851 he practised as E. G. Paley, and in 1868 the firm became Paley & Austin when he took Hubert James Austin (1841–1915) into partnership. In 1896, when Harry Anderson Paley (1859–1946) joined the firm, it became Paley, Austin, & Paley, and from 1895 it was called Austin & Paley. Henry Austin (1865–1946) became a partner in 1914, and the firm then was called Austin, Paley, & Austin until 1915, when it was named Austin & Paley. In its various guises this firm was one of the most distinguished English architectural practices of the time, specializing in work for the Anglican Church in the North and the North Midlands. It tended to follow Bodley & Garner's rich late-Second Pointed and early Perp. English Gothic Revival style. Its masterpiece is St George's, Buxton Road, Stockport, Ches. (1893–7).

Bibliography

J. Curl (2002b);
Dixon & and Muthesius (1985);
Price (1998)

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Paley, Edward Graham." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jan. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Paley, Edward Graham." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (January 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paley-edward-graham

"Paley, Edward Graham." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved January 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/paley-edward-graham

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Graham, George

George Graham, 1674?–1751, English instrument maker. A clockmaker by trade, Graham designed clocks and watches that earned him membership in the Royal Society and were still manufactured into the present century. In 1725 he built a very accurate 8-ft (2.4-m) quadrant for the royal astronomer, Edmund Halley, at Greenwich; it was widely copied. His most important invention remains the micrometer screw, which enabled him to build zenith sections and calipers of unprecedented precision. Graham is buried in Westminster Abbey.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Graham, George." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jan. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Graham, George." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (January 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/graham-george

"Graham, George." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved January 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/graham-george

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.