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Vambéry, Arminius (1832-1913)

Vambéry, Arminius (1832-1913)

Hungarian historian and world traveler who may have communicated to author Bram Stoker the facts and legends concerning the real Prince Dracula (Vlad V), who supplied the inspiration for Stoker's famous occult thriller. Stoker and Vambéry met at the Beefsteak Club on April 30, 1890, after a performance of Henry Irving in the play The Dead Heart, and also two years later at Trinity College, Dublin, where Vambéry was presented with an honorary degree.

Sources:

Adler, Lory, and Richard Dalby. The Dervish of Windsor Castle. London: Bachman & Turner, 1979.

Melton, J. Gordon. The Vampire Book: An Encyclopedia of the Undead. Detroit: Gale Research, 1994.

Vambéry, Arminius. The Story of My Struggles: The Memoirs of Arminius Vambéry. 2 vols. New York, 1904; London: T. F. Unwin, 1905.

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"Vambéry, Arminius (1832-1913)." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Vambéry, Arminius (1832-1913)." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/vambery-arminius-1832-1913

"Vambéry, Arminius (1832-1913)." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Retrieved November 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/vambery-arminius-1832-1913

Vambery, Arminius

Arminius Vambery (väm´bārĬ), Hung. Ármin Vámbéry (är´mĬn), 1832–1913, Hungarian philologist and traveler. In Constantinople (1857–63) he learned several languages and dialects of Asia Minor and then traveled through Armenia and Persia in the dress of a native. He was a professor of Oriental languages at the Univ. of Budapest from 1865 to 1905 and wrote many books on his travels and on languages and ethnology.

See his autobiography (1884) and his memoirs, The Story of My Struggles (1904), both in English.

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"Vambery, Arminius." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Vambery, Arminius." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/vambery-arminius

"Vambery, Arminius." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/vambery-arminius