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Timbaland 1971–

Timbaland 1971

Rapper, producer

Tireless Studio Training Paid Off

Came Up From Da Bassment

Singular Style Was Imitated

Selected discography

Sources

Hip-hop and R&B producer Timbaland, wrote music critic Touré in Rolling Stone, was among the few modern sound makers who have a signature sound, not a formula. Timbaland made his name crafting a string of multi-platinum hits for superstar artists, most notably for Jay-Z, Ginuwine, the late Aaliyah, and childhood friend Missy Misdemeanor Elliot. Among his biggest singles are Ginuwines Pony, SWVs Can We, and Aaliyahs One in a Million. Timbaland scored his own Top Ten hit in 1997, Up Jumps Da Boogie, with long-time friend Magoo.

Tireless Studio Training Paid Off

Norfolk, Virginia native Timbaland was born Tim Mosley on March 10, 1971. He grew up sharing his interest in music with neighborhood friends and fellow future hip-hop stars Missy Elliot and Magoo. As a teen, Timbaland practiced his DJ and beatboxing skills. In the early 1990s when Elliot, then a member of the group Sista, was discovered by De Vante Swing of Jodeci, she asked Timbaland to create the music for the groups demo tape. At age 19, under Swings tutelage, Timbaland learned to use studio equipment, spending days at time honing his new skills. The early days were tough but invaluable, Timbaland remembered in his online biography found at the Official Timbaland and Magoo website. DeVante was hard on me and that made me really hard on myself. The fledgling producer formed Da Bassment crew, a group that included Elliot, Magoo, Playa, and Ginuwine. One by one, each artist struck out and found his own recording deal. Timbaland landed at the Blackground record label with two dealsone as a solo act, the other as half of the rap duo Timbaland and Magoo.

The producers singular style was first evident on Aaliyahs 1996 hit ballad, One in a Million, which showcased many of Timbalands trademark rhythmic tricks: syncopated kick drum patterns stuttering in triple-time bursts, stop-start grooves full of disconcerting but tense funky hesitations, wrote music critic Simon Reynolds in the New York Times. As with earlier rhythmic innovations, Timbalands twitchy beats practically enforce a new kind of dancing, convulsive yet geometrically precise, Reynolds continued.

Long-time friends Timbaland and Magoo released their first album together, Welcome to Our World, in 1997.

At a Glance

Born Tim Mosley on March 10, 1971, in Norfolk, VA.

Career: Rapper, producer. Worked with DeVante Swing of Jodeci, c. 1990; formed Da Bassment crew with Missy Elliot, Magoo, Playa, and Ginuwine; signed two deals with the Background record label; produced Aaliyahs hit ballad, One in a Million, 1996; released Welcome to Our World and hit single, Up Jumps Da Boogie, with Magoo, 1997; produced Elliots Supa Dupa Fly, 1997; released solo debut, Tims Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment, 1998; produced hit songs for Nas, Snoop Dogg, and Jay-Z; founded Interscope imprint label Beat Club, 2000; released Indecent Proposal with Magoo, 2001.

Awards: named Top Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Producer, Bill board magazine, 2000.

Addresses: Record Company Virgin Records, 304 Park Ave. S., New York, NY 10010.

The album achieved platinum status for record sales, and boasted a hit single, Up Jumps Da Boogie, which featured Elliot and Aaliyah and reached Number 12 on Billboards Hot 100 chart. Timbaland and Magoo lent their skills to Elliots debut solo release, Supa Dupa Fly in 1997. With Supa Dupa Fly, the trio had established the South as a hip-hop mecca to rival New York and Los Angeles, according Billboard.

Came Up From Da Bassment

Timbaland was already a familiar name in the music world by the time he released his own solo debut in 1998, titled Tims Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment. The album is steeped in comicbook culture, with references to Spider Man, Wonder Woman, and Green Lanterna trend that allows rappers to indulge in violent fantasies that have no connection to reality, according to critic David Browne in Entertainment Weekly. Tims Bio illustrated that Timbaland prefers a sensuous flow (adding staccato beats to eliminate all traces of wimpiness), Browne continued, and he knows the value of letting arrangements breathe.

The release garnered praise from Entertainment Weeklys Bob Brunner, who called Timbaland hip-hops most inventive producer, and described the albums first single, Here We Come, as infectious. Rolling Stone critic Touré called the work inconsistent. While the record boasted club bangers like Lobster and Scrimp and Talkin on the Phone, Touré wrote, songs like Here We Come and Wit Yo Bad Self, built on the theme songs to Spider Man and I Dream of Jeannie, respectively, were novel, their lyrics were silly. Tims Bio, Brunner wrote, promises to push him from the studio and into the spotlight. But Timbaland did not seem entirely comfortable with that prospect, and told Brunner, The attention is cool, but I like it how it is.

By the late 1990s, Timbaland was a high-paid producer for the biggest names in rap, including Nas, Snoop Dogg, and Jay-Z, for whom he earned top dollar to lend his stamp to the occasional hit. What those artists paid dearly for was Timbalands almost surefire golden touch. The producer brought to the table an uncanny knack for producing commercially successful musicthe majority of his production, remixing, and writing credits are featured on double-platinum-selling singles and albums. Im a great producer, Timbaland boasted in Rolling Stone in 2001, so people need me more than I need them. Though he can come off as cocky at times, Timbaland also appreciated the value of his success, and the importance of sustaining it. I look at it like this: Ive got a job, and I just dont want to get laid off, he told Billboard.

Singular Style Was Imitated

One of the first hip-hop producers to create tracks from original beats, rather than depending on samples, Timbaland created an undoubtedly unique sound. His beats bounce, with something of a Southern feel, and boast a shuddering sense of rhythm, according to All Music Guide online. He often uses his own, deep voice, rapping subtly behind tracks, and injects whimsical sounds, like a cooing baby or whinnying horse. Tim-balands style influenced a new generation of producersscores of hip-hop hits were made to echo the trademark Timbaland sound. The real testament to Timbalands success, wrote Simon Reynolds in the New York Times, was his pervasive influence on other R&B artists, from TLC to Blackstreet. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Timbaland should be, Reynolds continued, feeling pretty good. Its cool, Timbaland said of the flattery in Billboard, but its starting to get on my nerves.

Timbaland and Magoos follow up to Welcome to Our World was a long time coming. Four years after their debut, they released Indecent Proposal. Work commenced on the project late in 2000, with Timbaland and Magoo hunkered down in a New York City recording studio. The result, wrote Billboards Christopher Walsh after hearing some rough takes long before the album was finished, was overwhelmingly powerful, complex, and unique music, encompassing a wide array of instrumentation and styles. Though the two were friends since childhood, Magoo told Billboard, when I get in a studio Ive got a different respect for him. Hes a good director . He makes me think a lot deeper than I would if I was just home writing. Timbaland earned a reputation for creating a creative atmosphere that other artists thrive in while recording, possibly because his own artistic sensibilities. In 2000 Timbaland was named the Top Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Producer in Billboards year-end magazine, and closed out the year with nine singles on the charts.

In an effort to discover the next generation of stars, Timbaland signed a deal with Interscope records to create the Beat Club record label, a new Interscope imprint. The labels first release was Dark Days, Bright Nights by Bubba Sparxxx, which was released in 2001 and produced by Timbaland. He also released and produced albums by Storm and Ms. Jade. I look at all these producers out there, and I like them all, Timbaland told Billboard. But I can take a rugrat and build him to Willy Wonka. I bring everybody out of the hole! thats what I do. Timbaland looked forward to releasing work by country-rock singer Shelby Norman and an Atlanta rock group. For his producer duties, Timbaland remained in demand, working on tracks for No Doubt and Limp Bizkit, hoping to one day work with acts like Bjork, the Cranberries, and the heavy-metal group Metallica.

Selected discography

(as solo artist)

Tims Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment, Atlantic, 1998.

(with Magoo)

Welcome to Our World, Blackground, 1997.

Indecent Proposal, Virgin, 2001.

(as producer)

One in a Million, Aaliyah, 1996.

Ginuwine the Bachelor, Ginuwine, 1996.

Supa Dupa Fly, 1997.

Hip Hop Mix, Cali Kings, 1999.

Unrestricted, Da Brat, 2000.

Aaliyah, Aaliyah, 2001.

Dark Days, Bright Nights, Bubba Sparxxx, 2001.

Sources

Periodicals

Billboard, January 13, 2001, p. 43.

Entertainment Weekly, November 20, 1998, p. 125; December 18, 1998, p. 79.

New York Times, August 1, 1999, p. 27.

Rolling Stone, December 10, 1998, p. 120; September 27, 2001, p. 15.

USA Today, October 22, 1999, p. 2E.

Online

All Music Guide, http://www.allmusic.com (November 7, 2001).

Official Timbaland and Magoo Website, http://www.timbalandandmagoo.net (November 7, 2001).

Brenna Sanchez

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Timbaland

Timbaland

Producer, rap musician

For the Record…

Selected discography

Sources

Hip-hop and R&B producer Timbaland, wrote music critic Touré in Rolling Stone, was “among the few modern sound makers who have a signature sound, not a formula.” Timbaland made his name crafting a string of multiplatinum hits for superstar artists, most notably for Jay-Z, Ginuwine, the late Aaliyah, and childhood friend Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliot. Among his biggest singles are Ginuwine’s “Pony,” Jay-Z’s “Big Pimpin’,” and Aaliyah’s “One in a Million.” Timbaland scored his own top ten hit in 1997, “Up Jumps Da Boogie,” with longtime friend Magoo.

Norfolk, Virginia, native Timbaland was born Tim Mosley on March 10, 1971. He grew up sharing his interest in music with neighborhood friends and fellow future hip-hop stars Missy Elliot and Magoo. As a teen, Timbaland practiced his DJ and beatboxing skills. In the early 1990s when Elliot, then a member of the group Sista, was discovered by DeVante Swing of Jodeci, she asked Timbaland to create the music for the group’s demo tape. At age 19, under Swing’s tutelage, Timbaland learned to use studio equipment, spending days at time honing his new skills. “The early days were tough but invaluable,” Timbaland remembered in his online biography found at the Timbaland and Magoo official website. “DeVante was hard on me and that made me really hard on myself.” The fledgling producer formed Da Bassment crew, a group that included Elliot, Magoo, Playa, and Ginuwine. One by one, each artist struck out and found his own recording deal. Timbaland landed at the Blackground record label with two deals—one as a solo act, the other as half of the rap duo Timbaland and Magoo.

The producer’s singular style was first evident on Aaliyah’s 1996 hit ballad, “One in a Million,” which “showcased many of Timbaland’s trademark rhythmic tricks: syncopated kick drum patterns stuttering in triple-time bursts, stop-start grooves full of disconcerting but tense funky hesitations,” wrote music critic Simon Reynolds in the New York Times. “As with earlier rhythmic innovations, Timbaland’s twitchy beats practically enforce a new kind of dancing, convulsive yet geometrically precise,” Reynolds continued.

Longtime friends Timbaland and Magoo released their first album together, Welcome to Our World, in 1997. The album achieved platinum status for record sales, and boasted a hit single, “Up Jumps Da Boogie,” which featured Elliot and Aaliyah and reached number 12 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart. Timbaland and Magoo lent their skills to Elliot’s debut solo release, Supa Dupa Fly in 1997. With Supa Dupa Fly, the trio had “established the South as a hip-hop mecca to rival New York and Los Angeles,” according Billboard.

Timbaland was already a familiar name in the music world by the time he released his own solo debut in 1998, titled Tim’s Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment. The album is steeped in

For the Record…

Born Tim Mosley on March 10, 1971, in Norfolk, VA.

Worked with DeVante Swing of Jodeci, c. 1990; formed Da Bassment crew with Missy Elliot, Magoo, Playa, and Ginuwine; signed two deals with the Blackground record label; produced Aaliyah’s hit ballad, “One in a Million,” 1996; released Welcome to Our World and hit single “Up Jumps Da Boogie” with Magoo, 1997; produced Elliot’s Supa Dupa F/y, 1997; released solo debut, Tim’s Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment, 1998; produced hit songs for Nas, Snoop Dogg, and Jay-Z; founded Interscope imprint label Beat Club, 2000; released Indecent Proposal with Magoo, 2001.

Awards: Billboard magazine, Top Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Producer, 2000.

Addresses: Record company—Virgin Records, 304 Park Ave. S., New York, NY 10010.

comic-book culture, with references to Spider Man, Wonder Woman, and Green Lantern—a “trend that allows rappers to indulge in violent fantasies that have no connection to reality,” according to critic David Browne in Entertainment Weekly. Tim’s Bio illustrated that Timbaland “prefers a sensuous flow (adding staccato beats to eliminate all traces of wimpiness),” Browne continued, “and he knows the value of letting arrangements breathe.”

The release garnered praise from Entertainment Weekly’s Bob Brunner, who called Timbaland “hip-hop’s most inventive producer,” and described the album’s first single, “Here We Come,” as “infectious.” Rolling Stone critic Touré called the work “inconsistent.” While the record boasted “club bangers” like “Lobster and Scrimp” and “Talkin’ on the Phone,” Touré wrote, songs like “Here We Come” and “Wit’ Yo Bad Self,” built on the theme songs to Spider Man and I Dream ofJeannie, respectively, were novel, their lyrics were “silly.” Tim’s Bio, Brunner wrote, “promises to push him from the studio and into the spotlight.” But Timbaland did not seem entirely comfortable with that prospect, and told Brunner, “The attention is cool, but I like it how it is.”

By the late 1990s, Timbaland was a high-paid producer for the biggest names in rap, including Nas, Snoop Dogg, and Jay-Z, for whom he earned top dollar to lend his stamp to the occasional hit. What those artists paid dearly for was Timbaland’s almost surefire golden touch. The producer brought to the table an uncanny knack for producing commercially successful music—the majority of his production, remixing, and writing credits are featured on double-platinum-selling singles and albums. “I’m a great producer,” Timbaland boasted in Rolling Stone in 2001, “so people need me more than I need them.” Though he can come off as cocky at times, Timbaland also appreciated the value of his success, and the importance of sustaining it. “I look at it like this: I’ve got a job, and I just don’t want to get laid off,” he told Billboard.

One of the first hip-hop producers to create tracks from original beats, rather than depending on samples, Timbaland created an undoubtedly unique sound. His beats bounce, with something of a Southern feel, and boast a “shuddering sense of rhythm,” according to All Music Guide online. He often uses his own, deep voice, rapping subtly behind tracks, and injects whimsical sounds, like a cooing baby or whinnying horse. Timbaland’s style influenced a new generation of producers—scores of hip-hop hits were made to echo the trademark Timbaland sound. “The real testament to” Timbaland’s success, wrote Simon Reynolds in the New York Times, was his “pervasive influence … on other R&B artists, from TLC to Blackstreet. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.” Timbaland should be, Reynolds continued, “feeling pretty good.” “It’s cool,” Timbaland said of the flattery in Billboard, “but it’s starting to get on my nerves.”

Timbaland and Magoo’s follow up to Welcome to Our World was a long time coming. Four years after their debut, they released Indecent Proposal. Work commenced on the project late in 2000, with Timbaland and Magoo hunkered down in a New York City recording studio. The result, wrote Billboard’s Christopher Walsh after hearing some rough takes long before the album was finished, was “overwhelmingly powerful, complex, and unique music, encompassing a wide array of instrumentation and styles.” Though the two were friends since childhood, Magoo told Billboard, “when I get in a studio I’ve got a different respect for him. He’s a good director… He makes me think a lot deeper than I would if I was just home writing.” Timbaland earned a reputation for creating a creative atmosphere that other artists thrive in while recording, possibly because his own artistic sensibilities. In 2000 Timbaland was named the Top Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Producer in Billboard’s year-end magazine, and closed out the year with nine singles on the charts.

In an effort to discover the next generation of stars, Timbaland signed a deal with Interscope Records to create the Beat Club record label, a new Interscope imprint. The label’s first release was Dark Days, Bright Nights by Bubba Sparxxx, which was released in 2001 and produced by Timbaland. He also released and produced albums by Storm and Ms. Jade. “I look at all these producers out there, and I like them all,” Tim-baland told Billboard. “But I can take a rugrat and build him to Willy Wonka. I bring everybody out of the hole! That’s what I do.” Timbaland looked forward to releasing work by country-rock singer Shelby Norman and an Atlanta rock group. For his producer duties, Timbaland remained in demand, working on tracks for No Doubt and Limp Bizkit, hoping to one day work with acts like Björk, the Cranberries, and the heavy-metal group Metallica.

Selected discography

Solo

Tim’s Bio: From the Motion Picture: Life From Da Bassment, Atlantic, 1998.

With Timbaland & Magoo

Welcome to Our World, Blackground, 1997.

Indecent Proposal, Virgin, 2001.

As producer

Aaliyah, One in a Million, 1996.

Ginuwine, Ginuwine… the Bachelor, 1996.

Missy Misdemeanor Elliott, Supa Dupa Fly, 1997.

Jay-Z, Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life, 1998.

Cali Kings, Hip Hop Mix, 1999.

Missy Misdemeanor Elliott, Da Real World, 1999.

Ginuwine, 100% Ginuwine, 1999.

Da Brat, Unrestricted, 2000.

Jay-Z, Vol. 3: Life and Times of Sean Carter, 2000.

K-Ci & Jo-Jo, X, 2000.

Memphis Bleek, Understanding, 2000.

Ludacris, Back for the First Time, 2000.

Snoop Dogg, Last Meal, 2000.

Aaliyah, Aaliyah, 2001.

Fabolous, Ghetto Fabolous, 2001.

Ginuwine, The Life, 2001.

Jadakiss, Kiss tha Game Goodbye, 2001.

Bubba Sparxxx, Dark Days, Bright Nights, 2001.

Missy Misdemeanor Elliott, Miss E.… So Addictive, 2001.

Jay-Z, Blueprint, 2001.

Limp Bizkit, New Old Songs, 2001.

Ludacris, Word of Mouf, 2001.

Aaliyah, I Care 4U, 2002.

TLC, 3D, 2002.

Karen Clark Sheard, 2nd Chance, 2002.

Baby, Birdman, 2002.

Destiny’s Child, This is the Remix, 2002.

Missy Misdemeanor Elliott, Under Construction, 2002.

Eminem, Eminem Show, 2002.

Jay-Z, Blueprint2: The Gift & the Curse, 2002.

Mack 10, Presents the Hood, 2002.

Justin Timberlake, Justified, 2002.

Fabolous, Street Dreams, 2003.

Lil’Kim, Bella Mafia, 2003.

Solange, Solo Star, 2003.

Sources

Books

Contemporary Black Biography, volume 32, Gale Group, 2002.

Periodicals

Billboard, January 13, 2001, p. 43.

Entertainment Weekly, November 20, 1998, p. 125; December 18, 1998, p. 79.

New York Times, August 1, 1999, p. 27.

Rolling Stone, December 10, 1998, p. 120; September 27, 2001, p. 15.

USA Today, October 22, 1999, p. 2E.

Online

“Timbaland,” All Music Guide,http://www.allmusic.com (April 29, 2003.

Timbaland and Magoo Official Website, http://www.timbalandandmagoo.net (April 29, 2003).

Brenna Sanchez

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"Timbaland." Contemporary Musicians. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/timbaland

Timbaland

TIMBALAND

Born: Tim Mosley; Virginia Beach, Virginia, 10 March 1971

Genre: Rap

Best-selling album since 1990: Welcome to Our World (1997)

Hit songs since 1990: "Up Jumps Da Boogie," "Here We Come"


In the late 1990s the influence of producer/artist Timbaland in the R&B/hip-hop world knew few boundaries. His bounces-and-beats sound pervaded many of the top hits by such artists as the late Aaliyah, Ginuwine, Boyz II Men, Nas, JayZ, and Missy "Misdemeanor" Elliott. Like the influential mid-1980s producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis (Janet Jackson), Timbaland created a new rap blueprint that used stuttered beats to set the rhythm and add power to rap's pop hooks. The new sound was so attractive and exciting that it helped transform modern rap into a lively and relevant part of American culture.

Timbaland began his career working in Da Bassment, a loose-knit group of producers, writers, and MCs who worked in the background behind Jodeci. He later formed a duo with the rapper Magoo in Norfolk, Virginia. The two had met as teenagers in the early 1990s and had begun to write songs for several artists, including Ginuwine and Missy Elliott. Timbaland's genius for creating infectious rhythms was first showcased in Missy Elliott's influential CD Supa Dupa Fly (1997), which bristles with electric beats, futuristic atmospherics, and dancehall flavors. The CD features guests Busta Rhymes, Lil' Kim, Da Brat, and Aaliyah. Timbaland and Magoo produced their first single, "Up Jumps Da' Boogie," in the fall of 1997. Featuring Missy Elliott and Aaliyah, the single peaked at number twelve on the Billboard Hot 100. Timbaland and Magoo included the single on their platinum-selling debut album, Welcome to Our World (1997). With its eighteen tracks, the CD showcases Timbaland's knack for fusing catchy beats and minor sampling for a distinctive sound.

While waiting to work on his solo CD, Timbaland kept producing, writing, and remixing for other artists. Timbaland's Tim's Bio: Life from Da Bassment (1998) pays tribute to early funk and, radically, samples the themes from Spider-man and I Dream of Jeannie ; it features a stellar list of guests including Nas, Jay-Z, Mad Skillz, Aaliyah, and others. The album resonates with skittering beats, call-and-respond raps, and fresh, fun rhythms. Timbaland's strength is his fearless sense of experimentation in the studio. His hits, his own and the ones he wrote for others, make him a much sought-after and much-copied producer.

Legal problems delayed his follow-up, Indecent Proposal (2001), by almost a year. It provides a new sonic template that stretches the possibilities of commercial rap. Freely mixing and matching 1970s funk, disco, and soul with bits of jazz and ambient grooves, Timbaland continued with his trademark envelope pushing. "Indian Carpet" is fueled by futuristic beats, while other tunes feature snippets of Asian, Arab, and Indian music. The mellow, reflective ballad "I'm Music" features Aaliyah (her last recording) with the singer/songwriter Beck. Other guests include Snoop Dogg, Twista, Jay-Z, Ludacris, Bubba Spar, and Magoo.

Timbaland's talent for creating memorable grooves comes from his understanding that new, original, but contagious beats fuel the catchy power of tunes. Using these skills, Timbaland has elevated his game and along the way he has helped expand rap's commercial potency in the new millennium.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Welcome to Our World (Blackground, 1997); Tim's Bio (Blackground, 1998); Indecent Proposal: Life from Da Bassment (Blackground, 2001).

ramiro burr

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"Timbaland." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Timbaland." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/timbaland

"Timbaland." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/timbaland