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Heavy D 1967- (Heavy D and the Boyz, Dwight Myers, Dwight E. "Heavy D" Myers, Dwight Errington Myers, Dwight "Heavy D" Myers)

Heavy D 1967- (Heavy D and the Boyz, Dwight Myers, Dwight E. "Heavy D" Myers, Dwight Errington Myers, Dwight "Heavy D" Myers)

PERSONAL

Original name, Dwight Errington Myers; born May 24, 1967, in Jamaica (some sources cite Mount Vernon, NY); some sources state that he immigrated to the United States, c. 1971; son of Clifford Vincent (a machine technician) and Eulahlee Lee (a nurse) Myers; children: Xea.

Addresses:

Office—Uptown/MCA Records, 1755 Broadway, New York, NY 10019.

Career:

Actor, hip hop recording artist, song performer, and songwriter. Heavy D and the Boyz, founder and member, beginning c. 1980s; Music 4-Life, founder, 1993; Uptown/MCA Records, vice president of A & R and president, beginning 1990s; Universal Music Group, senior vice president, beginning c. 1997; also worked as a music producer. Also known as Dwight Myers.

Member:

American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, Screen Actors Guild, American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

Awards, Honors:

Drama Desk Award nomination, outstanding featured actor in a play, 1996, for Riff Raff; other awards include a Soul Train Award; Grammy Award nominations; platinum records for Living Large, 1987, Big Tyme, 1989, Peaceful Journey, 1991, and Nuttin' but Love, 1994, gold record for Blue Funk, c. 1992, all from the Recording Industry Association of America.

CREDITS

Film Appearances:

(Sometimes credited as Dwight E. "Heavy D" Myers) Himself, Who's the Man?, New Line Cinema, 1993.

(As Dwight Errington Myers) Bo-Kane, New Jersey Drive, Gramercy Pictures, 1995.

Himself, Your Studio and You (short film), Universal, 1995.

Bo, The Deli, Golden Monkey Pictures, 1997.

Himself, B*A*P*S (also known as B.A.P.S., Beverly Hills Beauties, Duas sopeiras em Beverly Hills, Les reines de Beverly Hills, Se upp Beverly Hills, and Vita da principesse), New Line Cinema, 1997.

Himself, Rhyme & Reason (documentary), Miramax, 1997.

Cowardly Lion, The Wizard of Oz, 1998.

Jake, Life (also known as Ate que a fuga os separe, Condenados a fugarse, E a vida, La vie, Lebenslaenglich, Perpete, and Venner for livet), Universal, 1999.

Peaches, The Cider House Rules (also known as Aeblemostreglementet, Arvak hercege, Ciderhusreglerna, Gottes Werk & Teufels Beitrag, L'oeuvre de Dieu, la part du diable, Las normas de la casa de la sidra, Las reglas de la vida, Le regole della casa del sidro, Oman elaemaensae sankari, Regras da casa, Regras da vida, and Thea ston okeano), Miramax, 1999.

(As Dwight "Heavy D" Myers) FBI agent Pat Greer, Big Trouble (also known as Belea mare in Miami, Big trouble—Una valigia piena di guai, El gran lio, Grande problema, Hasta el cuello, Jede Menge Aerger, and Kakos belas), Buena Vista, 2001.

Frankie, Black Listed, York Entertainment, 2003.

Bear, Dallas 362, 2003, ThinkFilm, 2005.

Charles, Larceny, Empire Pictures, 2004.

Omar, Step Up, Buena Vista, 2006.

Television Appearances; Series:

(As Dwight "Heavy D" Myers) Mr. Lick/Big Boy, Boston Public, Fox, 2000-2003.

Bernard, The Tracy Morgan Show, NBC, 2003-2004.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

(In archive footage) Himself, Heroes of Black Comedy, Comedy Central, 2002.

And You Don't Stop: 30 Years of Hip Hop, VH1, 2004.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Grammy Living Legends, CBS, 1989.

Motown 30: What's Goin' On!, 1990.

Rock the House, 1990.

Time Warner Presents the Earth Day Special (also known as The Earth Day Special), ABC, 1990.

Himself, Sinbad and Friends: All the Way LiveAlmost!, 1991.

NBC All-Star Stay in School Jam, NBC and TNT, 1991.

Comic Relief V, 1992.

Michael Jackson: The Dangerous Tour!, Fox, 1992.

NBA All-Star Stay in School Jam, TNT, 1992.

On a Dead Man's Chest, HBO, 1992.

Rosie Perez Presents "Society's Ride," 1993.

AT&T Presents: Queen Latifah and Friends, Fox, 1994.

Halloween Jam III, ABC, 1994.

People (also known as People: An Animated Celebration of Diversity), Disney Channel, 1995.

Richard Headley, Next Afternoon, broadcast as part of The Showtime Black Filmmaker Showcase, Showtime, 2000.

Sean "Puffy" Combs, Arts and Entertainment, 2001.

Himself, Reel Comedy: Big Trouble, Comedy Central, 2002.

The Sixth Annual Sears Soul Train Christmas Starfest, UPN, 2003.

Television Appearances; Awards Presentations:

Presenter, The Second Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1988.

Performer, The Third Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1989.

Presenter, The Fourth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1990.

Presenter, The Fifth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1991.

Himself, The Sixth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1992.

Met Life Presents the Apollo Theatre Hall of Fame, 1994.

The American Music Awards, ABC, 1995.

The 1995 Source Hip-Hop Music Awards, 1995.

10th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, The WB, 1996.

Soul Train Music Awards: 11th Anniversary, The WB, 1997.

Cohost, The 12th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1998.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Himself, Soul Train, syndicated, 1988.

(As Heavy D and the Boyz) Himself, "Delusion of Daddyhood," A Different World, NBC, 1989.

MTV Unplugged, MTV and MTV2, 1989.

Fatz Turner, "Mobile Home," Booker (also known as Booker, P.I.), Fox, 1990.

Himself, "Someday Your Prince Will Be in Effect," The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, NBC, 1990.

(As Heavy D and the Boyz) Himself, Dionne and Friends, syndicated, 1990.

Musical performer, In Living Color, Fox, 1990, 1992.

Farouche, "In a Dead Man's Chest," Tales from the Crypt (also known as HBO's "Tales from the Crypt"), HBO, 1992.

Calvin Hendricks, "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Father," Roc (also known as Roc Live), Fox, 1993.

Calvin Hendricks, "Sheila in the House," Roc (also known as Roc Live), Fox, 1993.

Calvin Hendricks, "To Love and Die on Emerson Street: Parts 1 & 2," Roc (also known as Roc Live), Fox, 1993.

(As Dwight "Heavy D" Myers) Darryl, "Thanks for Giving," Living Single (also known as My Girls), Fox, 1994.

(As Dwight "Heavy D" Myers) Darryl, "If the Crew Fits," Living Single (also known as My Girls), Fox, 1995.

Voice of Drexel, "The Golden Goose," Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (animated), HBO, 1995.

(As Dwight "Heavy D" Myers) Darryl, "Do You Take This Man's Wallet?," Living Single (also known as My Girls), Fox, 1996.

Voice of himself, "Botzwana Aki and the Hydrant of Doom," Waynehead (animated), The WB, 1996.

(As Dwight Errington Myers) Gordon Ganza, "This Shotgun for Hire," Martial Law (also known as Le flic de Shanghai, Ley marcial, and Piu forte ragazzi), CBS, 1999.

Panelist, The List, VH1, 1999.

Dexter, "Accidental Doctor," For Your Love (also known as You Send Me, Foer kaerleks skull, and Tris di cuori), The WB, 2000.

Charlie, "Barbecue," Yes, Dear, CBS, 2005.

Sid Shapiro, "A Boy in a Tree," Bones (also known as Brennan, Bones—Die Knochenjaegerin, Dr. Csont, and Kondid), Fox, 2005.

Sid Shapiro, "The Man in the Fallout Shelter," Bones (also known as Brennan, Bones—Die Knochenjaegerin, Dr. Csont, and Kondid), Fox, 2005.

Sid Shapiro, "The Man on Death Row," Bones (also known as Brennan, Bones—Die Knochenjaegerin, Dr. Csont, and Kondid), Fox, 2005.

Himself, Tavis Smiley, PBS, 2005.

Television Appearances; Pilots:

Bernard, The Tracy Morgan Show, NBC, 2003.

Stage Appearances:

Tony, Riff Raff, Circle in the Square Downtown, New York City, 1995.

Dale "D. J." Jackson, Medal of Honor Rag, Egyptian Arena Theatre, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 2005.

RECORDINGS

Albums; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

Living Large, MCA Records, 1987.

Big Tyme, MCA Records, 1989.

Peaceful Journey, MCA Records, 1991.

Blue Funk, MCA Records, 1992.

Nuttin' but Love, MCA Records, 1994.

Heavy Hitz, MCA Records, 2000.

20th Century Masters—The Millennium Collection: The Best of Heavy D, MCA Records, 2002.

Solo Albums:

Waterbed Hev, Universal Records, 1997.

Heavy, Uptown/MCA Records/Universal Records, 1999.

Albums; with Others:

Various artists, People: A Musical Celebration of Diversity (also known as People), Lightyear Entertainment, 1995.

Singles; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

"Mr. Big Stuff," c. 1986.

"Don't You Know," c. 1987.

"The Overweight Lover's in the House," c. 1987.

"We Got Our Own Thang," MCA Records, 1989.

"Big Tyme," MCA Records, c. 1989.

"More Bounce" (maxicassette single one), MCA Records, 1990.

"Gyrlz, They Love Me" (also known as "Girls They Love Me" and "Girlz They Love Me"), MCA Records, c. 1990.

"Somebody for Me," MCA Records, c. 1990.

"Is It Good to You?," MCA Records, 1991.

"More Bounce" (maxicassette single two), MCA Records, 1991.

"Now That We Found Love," 1991.

"Peaceful Journey," MCA Records, c. 1991.

"Big & Ready," VP, 1991, 1992.

"Don't Curse," MCA Records, 1992.

"You Can't See What I See," 1992.

"You've Got a Way," MCA Records, 1992.

"Truthful," MCA Records, 1993.

"Who's the Man?" (also known as "Who's da Man?"), Uptown Records, c. 1993.

"Black Coffee," MCA, 1994.

"Nuttin' but Love," 1994.

"U Got Me Waiting," MCA, 1994.

"Sex wit You," MCA Records, 1995.

Solo Singles:

"Big Daddy," Uptown/Universal, 1997.

"I'll Do Anything," 1997.

"Keep It Comin'," 1997.

"Don't Stop," 1999.

"On Point" (featuring Eightball and Big Punisher), Uptown/Universal, 1999.

Other singles include "Bag of Blue Funk."

Music Videos; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

"Mr. Big Stuff," c. 1986.

"The Overweight Lover's in the House," c. 1987.

"We Got Our Own Thang," 1989.

"Gyrlz, They Love Me" (also known as "Girls They Love Me" and "Girlz They Love Me"), c. 1990.

"Somebody for Me," c. 1990.

"Is It Good to You?," 1991.

"Now That We Found Love," 1991.

"Don't Curse," 1992.

"You Can't See What I See," 1992.

"Truthful," 1993.

"Who's the Man?" (also known as "Who's da Man?"), c. 1993.

"Black Coffee," 1994.

"Nuttin' but Love," 1994.

"U Got Me Waiting," 1994.

"Sex wit You," 1995.

Solo Music Videos:

"Big Daddy," Uptown/Universal, 1997.

"Keep It Comin'," 1997.

"Don't Stop," 1999.

"On Point" (featuring Eightball and Big Punisher), Uptown/Universal, 1999.

Other music videos include "Bag of Blue Funk."

Music Videos by Others:

Janet Jackson, "Alright," 1990.

Michael Jackson, "Jam," 1992.

Super Cat, "Them No Worry We," 1993.

The Notorious B.I.G., "One More Chance," 1995.

Tyrese, "Criminal Mind," 1999.

Album Work; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

Producer, arranger, and mixer, Living Large, MCA Records, 1987.

Coproducer and assistant producer, Big Tyme, MCA Records, 1989.

Co-executive producer, Blue Funk, MCA Records, 1992.

Producer and coproducer, Nuttin' but Love, MCA Records, 1994.

Producer, Heavy Hitz, MCA Records, 2000.

Producer, 20th Century Masters—The Millennium Collection: The Best of Heavy D, MCA Records, 2002.

Heavy D's has produced music that has appeared in various television productions, films, albums, videos, and other projects.

Solo Album Work:

Producer, Waterbed Hev, Universal Records, 1997.

Producer, Heavy, Uptown/MCA Records/Universal Records, 1999.

Videos:

Himself, New Edition Past and Present, 1989.

Himself, "Alright," Janet Jackson: The Rhythm Nation Compilation, 1990.

(With Heavy D and the Boyz) We Got Our Own Thang, MCA, 1990.

(With Heavy D and the Boyz) Journey Continues, Pioneer, 1991.

Himself, "Jam," Dangerous: The Short Films (also known as Michael Jackson—Dangerous: The Short Films), 1993.

Himself, The Cider House Rules: The Making of an American Classic, 1999.

Himself, Hip Hop Uncensored Vol. 3: Hustlemania, Music Video Distributors, 2002.

Himself, "One More Chance," The Notorious B.I.G.: Ready to Die—The Remaster (short), Music Video Distributors, 2004.

WRITINGS

Television Theme Songs; Series:

In Living Color, Fox, 1990-94.

MAD TV (also known as Mad TV and MADtv), Fox, 1995—.

The Tracy Morgan Show, NBC, 2003-2004.

Television Songs; Specials:

Time Warner Presents the Earth Day Special (also known as The Earth Day Special), ABC, 1990.

Mad TV Holiday Show '04 Special Edition, Fox, 2004.

Albums; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

Living Large, MCA Records, 1987.

Big Tyme, MCA Records, 1989.

Peaceful Journey, MCA Records, 1991.

Blue Funk, MCA Records, 1992.

Nuttin' but Love, MCA Records, 1994.

Heavy Hitz, MCA Records, 2000.

20th Century Masters—The Millennium Collection: The Best of Heavy D, MCA Records, 2002.

Solo Albums:

Waterbed Hev, Universal Records, 1997.

Heavy, Uptown/MCA Records/Universal Records, 1999.

Albums; with Others:

Various artists, People: A Musical Celebration of Diversity (also known as People), Lightyear Entertainment, 1995.

Singles; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

"Mr. Big Stuff," c. 1986.

"Don't You Know," c. 1987.

"The Overweight Lover's in the House," c. 1987.

"We Got Our Own Thang," MCA Records, 1989.

"Big Tyme," MCA Records, c. 1989.

"More Bounce" (maxicassette single one), MCA Records, 1990.

"Gyrlz, They Love Me" (also known as "Girls They Love Me" and "Girlz They Love Me"), MCA Records, c. 1990.

"Somebody for Me," MCA Records, c. 1990.

"Is It Good to You?," MCA Records, 1991.

"More Bounce" (maxicassette single two), MCA Records, 1991.

"Peaceful Journey," MCA Records, c. 1991.

"Big & Ready," VP, 1991, 1992.

"Don't Curse," MCA Records, 1992.

"You Can't See What I See," 1992.

"You've Got a Way," MCA Records, 1992.

"Truthful," MCA Records, 1993.

"Who's the Man?" (also known as "Who's da Man?"), Uptown Records, c. 1993.

"Black Coffee," MCA, 1994.

"Nuttin' but Love," 1994.

"U Got Me Waiting," MCA, 1994.

"Sex wit You," MCA Records, 1995.

Solo Singles:

"Big Daddy," Uptown/Universal, 1997.

"I'll Do Anything," 1997.

"Keep It Comin'," 1997.

"Don't Stop," 1999.

"On Point" (featuring Eightball and Big Punisher), Uptown/Universal, 1999.

Other singles include "Bag of Blue Funk."

Video Music; with Heavy D and the Boyz:

We Got Our Own Thang, MCA, 1990.

Journey Continues, Pioneer, 1991.

Heavy D's music has appeared in various television productions, films, albums, videos, and other projects.

OTHER SOURCES

Books:

Contemporary Black Biography, Volume 58, Thomson Gale, 2007.

Contemporary Musicians, Volume 10, Gale, 1993.

Periodicals:

Billboard, April 19, 1997, p. 12.

Ebony, November, 1997, p. 148.

Essence, May, 1991, p. 58.

Jet, February 5, 1996, p. 40.

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"Heavy D 1967- (Heavy D and the Boyz, Dwight Myers, Dwight E. "Heavy D" Myers, Dwight Errington Myers, Dwight "Heavy D" Myers)." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/heavy-d-1967-heavy-d-and-boyz-dwight-myers-dwight-e-heavy-d-myers-dwight-errington-myers-dwight

"Heavy D 1967- (Heavy D and the Boyz, Dwight Myers, Dwight E. "Heavy D" Myers, Dwight Errington Myers, Dwight "Heavy D" Myers)." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/heavy-d-1967-heavy-d-and-boyz-dwight-myers-dwight-e-heavy-d-myers-dwight-errington-myers-dwight

Heavy D

Heavy D

Rap singer

For the Record

Three Platinum Albums

Now That We Found Love

Period of Trouble

Selected discography

Sources

Critics have credited Heavy D, the rap artist responsible for three platinum albums in less than five years, with achieving the unlikely in several ways: he insists on well-choreographed and peaceful shows in an industry that often has to tolerate violence; he became known as one of the sexiest men in rap despiteor even because ofhis 300-pound stature; and, most significantly, he infused his own hip-hop with rhythm and blues and encouraged established rhythm and blues artists to begin including rap sounds in their music. Dream Hampton, writing for American Visions, asserted that We Got Our Own Thang marked the beginning of what is now comfortably called R&B hip-hop.

Born Dwight Myers in Jamaica, not far from Montego Bay, in 1967, Heavy D had a natural start for the kind of crossing-over that would become his forte. His parents, Euhlalee and Cliff, had five children when they moved their family to Mt. Vernon, NY, during the 1970s. Dwight, the youngest, became known in his neighborhood as Heavy D and started on a regular diet of American rap.

Heavy Ds musical career began, according to publicity material from Uptown/MCA Records, with remarkable ease and some unexpected capital. He won $1500 while gambling in Atlantic City, and lent the money to his friend Eddie F (Edward Ferrell) to buy a computer because, as he told Uptown/MCA, Eddie F is damn near a genius; so I loaned him the money, and he got a computer. Before long he had traded the computer in for a drum machine, and thats how we got started making demos. Along with making the tapes, which artists typically submit to producers and club owners, they began playing at clubs and parties both in New York City and in Mount Vernon.

The group, collectively labeled Heavy D and the Boyz, also included longtime neighborhood friends G-Whiz (Glen Parrish) and Trouble T-Roy (Troy Dixon). While Heavy D, Eddie F and T-Roy created the music, G-Whiz honed the groups image, including the choreography, stage sets, and costumes for performance; later, he would become the creative force behind their videos.

While the friends naturally enough chose rap as their mediumall of them had grown up listening to it on their local radio stationsthe influence of other sounds was evident in their earliest songs. D told Uptown/MCA, I was always highly influenced by R&B.... My first single, Mr. Big Stuff, was based on an old Gene Knight record by the same name, and it was always my favorite record to rhyme off of in the park.

For the Record

Born Dwight Myers, c. 1967, near Montego Bay, Jamaica; son of Cliff (a film technician) and Euhlalee (a nurse) Myers.

Formed Heavy D and the Boyz with Eddie F (Edward Ferrell), G-Whiz (Glen Parrish), and Trouble T-Roy (Troy Dixon), mid-1980s; group made demo tapes and performed at local parties and clubs; released first single, Mr. Big Stuff, and first album, Living Large, 1987. Television appearances include Booker, A Different World, In Living Color (for which he wrote the theme song), and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air; film appearances include Whos the Man, 1993. Founder of record label Music 4-Life, 1993.

Awards: Platinum records for Living Large, 1987, Big Tyme, 1989, and Peaceful Journey, 1991; gold record for Blue Funk, 1993.

Addresses: Record company Uptown/MCA, 1755 Browdway, New York, NY 10019.

Three Platinum Albums

Mr. Big Stuff, an immediate hit on radio stations, prepared the market for the arrival of the new bands first album, 1987s Living Large. The album also introduced another hit single, whichas has become a trademarkpunned on Heavy Ds size, Overweight Lovers in the House. Soon Heavy D and the Boyz were an important new name in rap music; the album went gold, then platinum, and earned Heavy D a reputation both as an original rap musician and as the Overweight Lover.

In his press bio, Heavy D relayed the story of how that first album went into production. He noted particularly that he had earned the help of an important producer and that the move to his home label was determined by the politics of the rap market at the time: Eddie F and I were struggling, going through a lot of things just trying to make a record. ... And eventually we wound up with Russell Simmons of Def Jam Records. At that time Andre Harrell was with Def Jam. Later Andre branched off to form Uptown records, a subsidiary of MCA. But back then Def Jam was more interested in hardcore hip-hop and we always had more of an R&B flavor; so when Andre moved to Uptown, he took us with him.

Once those initial difficulties were smoothed over, however, the group met with greater and greater success in the market. Big Tyme, released in 1989, quickly went platinum and gained the Number One position on the rhythm and blues charts. Big Tyme also established Heavy D as an influence on the non-hip-hop music around him. Hampton noted that after Heavy D was featured on singer Leverts 1989 hit single, Just Coolin, everyone from Patti Labelle to Quincy Jones began incorporating rap into their formula for hits.

Heavy Ds success with the hybrid sounds in his own music widened his audience. As Hampton explained, His experimentation with rap and contemporary R&B has allowed him to cross over, which in rap ... means to receive radio air play. It also means that his music is palatable even to conservative listeners.

Now That We Found Love

Peaceful Journey added to Heavy Ds reputation. The albums success began with a series of hit singles, including Now That We Found Love, which made it to the Number Five position on the rhythm and blues singles charts in Billboard. Alan Light, writing for Rolling Stone, reflected the general excitement:Peaceful Journey is a triumph of sung choruses, insistent hooks and clear, upbeat lyricsa masterful display of pops rap strengths.

After the release of Peaceful Journey, D admitted that he had become uncertain about which direction he wanted his career to take. Already known as an especially talented stage performer, he developed an interest in acting. He has appeared on episodes of a variety of popular television shows, including Booker, A Different World, In Living Color for which he also wrote the theme songand The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.

The 1993 release of Heavy D and companys fourth album, Blue Funk, marked a deviation from the bands musical norm. In a critically acclaimed collaboration with some of the genres top producers, D turned out a collection of strong dancehall rhythms, a sound that was funkier, smoother, and more street-oriented than any of his previous recordings.

Dancehall is the most popular dance music among Jamaicans and the most current spinoff of reggae; it blends American hip-hop with reggae rhythms. The sound is also beginning to have an influence on rap in the United States. Heavy D told Spin contributor Dimitri Ehrlich that he considers dancehall a natural part of his musical repertoire: Basically, its my heritage. ... I was born in Jamaica, and dancehall reggae is something Ive always listened to. What the Jamaicans call DJing is very close to what rap is, and I was listening to that stuff before I ever got involved in rap. In terms of the lyrics, dancehall is even harder than rapping. They talk much faster, and its more skillful.

In addition to his work with the Boyz, D has released two singles in Jamaica that have become dancehall hits, both of which he cut with popular Jamaican musicians Super Cat and Frankie Paul; the singles, Big and Broad and Dem No Worry We, have been the work of Ds independent record label, Music 4-Life.

Period of Trouble

Despite the smooth sailing of his career, Heavy D has weathered some storms. Trouble T-Roy, Heavy Ds friend since childhood, died on January 15, 1990. The circumstances of his death have been reported differently in various sources: Dream Hampton referred to an accident backstage that occurred while T-Roy was on tour with Public Enemy, another successful rap band; Uptown/MCA asserted that T-Roy fell from an elevated car park while on tour with the Boyz.

In late 1991 Heavy D was caught up in the controversy surrounding a tragedy that received considerable publicity in the New York Times and on television news. As part of his charity work, Heavy D became one of the promoters of an event to raise money for AIDS education. The basketball game, featuring a lineup of rap stars, was planned for the Jeremiah T. Mahoney Hall gymnasium at City College of New York on December 29. Extensive publicity drew a turnout of about 5,000 peopletwice the number that the promoters had expectedand the crush in the hall outside of the gym caused nine deaths. In the following month, as the promoters, the college, the city, and the news media cast about for someone to blame, stereotypes about the inherent violence of rap surfaced.

Dream Hampton admitted, In the hip-hop nation of young urban blacks, confrontational music is the style, and a live show is inevitably plagued with the threat of senseless violence. But, Hampton went on to note that Heavy D has made a deliberate attempt to support the other potentials of hip-hopthe artistry, the integrity, and the empowerment for African-American youths that may be achievable without violence. In Stop the Violence: Overcoming Self-Destruction, edited by Nelson George, Heavy D declared, We strongly believe that violence is nonsense, and that weve got to get together as one. ... You pay your money to see a show but you end up seeing a boxing match. Its disgusting.

In another display of his creative reach, Heavy D has signed a deal with Universal Studios to develop a sitcom tentatively titled Little League, starring D as a businessman who adopts two street-smart kids. The project prompted the rapper to further hone his acting skills. Its fun to be somebody else and actually make it believable, he told US magazine, [but] I look at people like Denzel, DeNiro, Pacino and say, I got a long way to go.

Selected discography

With Heavy D and the Boyz

Living Large (includes Mr. Big Stuff and Overweight Lovers in the House), Uptown/MCA, 1987.

Big Tyme, Uptown/MCA, 1989.

Peaceful Journey (includes Now That We Found Love), Uptown/MCA, 1991.

Blue Funk, MCA, 1993.

(Contributor, with Buju Banton) Hotness, Whos the Man (soundtrack), Uptown/MCA, 1993.

Sources

Books

Stop the Violence: Overcoming Self-Destruction, edited by Nelson George, Pantheon, 1991.

Periodicals

American Visions, February/March 1992.

Billboard, September 21, 1991.

Essence, May 1991.

Music, January 29, 1993.

New York Times, January 3, 1992.

Pulse!, May 1993.

Reflex, Issue 29.

Rolling Stone, September 19, 1991; April 15, 1993.

Source, February 1993; April 1993.

Spin, April 1992.

US, May 1993.

Additional information for this profile was obtained from Uptown/MCA publicity materials, 1991 and 1993.

Ondine E Le Blanc

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Heavy D

HEAVY D

Born: Dwight Myers; Kingston, Jamaica, 21 May 1967

Genre: Rap

Best-selling album since 1990: Nuttin' but Love (1994) with Heavy D and the Boyz

Hit songs since 1990: "Now That We Found Love," "Nuttin' but Love," "Big Daddy/Keep It Coming"


Heavy D is one of the most well-balanced artists in hip-hop. Lyrically, he combines fun and romance with social awareness. Musically, he mixes elements of pop, reggae, and R&B for an accessible yet grounded sound. He has been a producer, actor, and music executive. He is also largely responsible for the career of Sean "P. Diddy" Combs.

Myers was born in Jamaica. His family moved to the New York City suburb of Mount Vernon. Myers began to rhyme as a child and asked friend Eddie F. to help him write songs. He adopted the name Heavy D as a reference to his large frame. He linked up with three dancers named Eddie, G-Wiz, and Trouble T-Roy, collectively called the Boyz, and in 1986 signed to the fledgling rap label Uptown Records. Heavy D and the Boyz's debut album, Living Large (1987), includes the danceable "The Overweight Lover's in the House," a remake of the Jean Knight hit "Mr. Big Stuff," the early rap ballad "Don't You Know," and a Teddy Rileproduced hometown homage "Moneyearnin' Mount Vernon." Heavy D also showcases his early production skills by co-piloting the tracks. Heavy D's rap style is colorful and lighthearted. The Boyz's buoyant dancing on stage and in their video intensifies the electric energy.

Fortified by the success of the debut, Heavy D and the Boyz' second album, Big Tyme (1989), boasts a variety of musical styles and big-name collaborators. The group scored crossover success with "Somebody for Me," the masterful dance-hall song "Mood for Love," and the New Jack Swinginfluenced "We Got Our Own Thang." Around this time another Mount Vernon teenager named Sean Combs was badgering Heavy D to give him an internship at Uptown Records. Heavy D eventually obliged, thus starting Combs's legendary ascent through the music industry. Big Tyme went on to sell more than 1 million copies, establishing the group as a hip-hop juggernaut.

In 1990 Heavy D and the Boyz suffered a devastating blow when Boyz member Troy Dixon, aka T-Roy, fell off a stage to his death. T-Roy's passing influenced the sound of the group's third album, Peaceful Journey (1991). It is a calm often introspective album, as evidenced by the missive "Letter to the Future." The tribute record to TRoy, "Now That We Found Love," became the group's best-selling single, earning a gold plaque. The entire album went platinum, and Heavy D catapulted to stardom. In 1990 he became the first rapper to record with Janet Jackson when he lent his vocals to the remix of her hit song "Alright." Soon after, Heavy D scored another pop slam dunk when he rhymed on Michael Jackson's song "Jam," from Jackson's album Dangerous (1992). Heavy D was the first rapper to record with the self-proclaimed King of Pop.

Balancing out these high-profile collaborations, Heavy D returned to his pure hip-hop roots on Blue Funk (1992). Gone are the R&B producers of past. This time he employs underground rap track-masters like DJ Premier of Gang Starr and Pete Rock (who is also Heavy D's cousin). Nevertheless, the album's most remembered hit is "Truthful," airy with an R&B melody. It is one of the few times a rap artist, typically concerned with maintaining a Teflon image, rhymes honestly about heartbreak.

Heavy D and the Boyz tipped the scales again with the rap/R&B triumph Nuttin' but Love (1994). Heavy D had become a well-entrenched hip-hop heavyweight, and this album is slick and well packaged. The hit title song, the female-directed "Black Coffee," and "Keep Waiting" (based on a smooth Luther Vandross sample) helped Heavy D and the Boyz score another platinum plaque.

In the ensuing years Heavy D began to expand his career horizons. He received a 19951996 Drama Desk award for his performance in the New York play Riff Raff, starring Laurence Fishburne, who also wrote and directed it. In 1996 Heavy D succeeded André Harrell and was named president of Uptown Records. He discovered and developed R&B acts like the successful Soul For Real and Monifah. Soon after, he relinquished the title, and the label folded. Heavy D decided to focus on acting, obtaining recurring roles on the TV show Living Single and parts in the films The Cider House Rules, Life, New Jersey Drive, and Big Trouble.

Taking a break from the Boyz, Heavy released a solo album, Waterbed Hev (1997), which features the gold-selling single "Big Daddy/Keep It Coming." His sophomore solo album, Heavy, became his first to sell fewer than 500,000 copies since his debut album with the Boyz.

Nevertheless, Heavy D had built a strong career behind the sound boards. He produced a hit single, "Summer Rain," and album track "Hey Now" for the R&B singer Carl Thomas, from his debut album, Emotional (2000). He tracked the daring, rock charged Jay-Z/Lenny Kravitz collaboration "Guns & Roses" for Jay-Z's album The Blueprint 2: The Gift and the Curse (2002). He also produced "Call Me," a song for the album Street Dreams (2003) by the rapper Fabolous.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Living Large (Uptown, 1987); Big Tyme (Uptown, 1989); Peaceful Journey (Uptown, 1991); Blue Funk (Uptown, 1992); Nuttin' but Love (Uptown, 1994); Waterbed Hev (Uptown/Universal, 1997); Heavy (Uptown/Universal, 1999).

dara cook

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"Heavy D." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Heavy D." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/heavy-d