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Scott, Jill

Jill Scott

Singer

Singer, poet, and songwriter Jill Scott burst onto the neosoul/R&B scene in a blaze of glory following the release of her double platinum-selling debut album, Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, in 2000. RollingStone.com writer Toure called Scott "the premier female romantic voice of the neosoul era." The notoriously down-to-earth Philadelphia native found herself awash in Grammy Award nominations, appeared onstage with soul diva Aretha Franklin on VH-1, and opened for rock star Sting on his North American tour. But the sudden onslaught of success did not go to her head. Writer Clarence Waldron summed it up in Jet when he declared that "Jill Scott is as real and honest as her down-home soul music. She is well-grounded and down-to-earth—despite her newfound stardom."

Scott was raised by her mother, Joyce Scott, and her grandmother, Blue Babe, in North Philadelphia. "She was a very loved child," Joyce Scott told Toure, a fact that Scott herself readily acknowledged. She remembered protective teenage boys in the neighborhood looking out for her, making sure she got home safely. Many of those boys, she recalled sadly to Sonia Sanchez in Essence, died from gunshot wounds. She later donated money for a computer lab to the elementary school she attended as a girl. She grew up listening to her grandmother humming tunes around the kitchen. She had very little formal vocal training, but spent years listening to artists who inspired her singing style. She credited singers like Sarah Vaughan, Donnie Hathaway, Minnie Riperton, and opera star Leontyne Price for influencing her vocal sound. "I listened and I went to a class that included all that I needed to learn," Scott told Sanchez. "I wanted to learn voice techniques, how to breathe. I wanted to learn how to use the tools, but I didn't want them to take over and crush the spirit."

Scott began her career as a poet while studying to become a high school English teacher at Temple University. When she first worked with children, Scott helped them learn how to spell by making up songs. The kids loved it, but her supervising teachers wrote her off as young and idealistic. Frustrated with her studies at Temple, Scott also pursued acting. At first she had balked when a friend suggested she should act, but when her first attempts were enjoyable and successful, she dropped out of school to take an apprenticeship with a theater company. She ultimately landed a role in the Canadian touring production of the hit Broadway musical Rent. She worked a number of jobs to make ends meet during those struggling years. She did manual labor on a theater construction site, scooped ice cream, and cleaned toilets—anything that left her time to write and wasn't a typical nine-to-five office job. Scott was one among a number of promising Philadelphia poets who regularly recited their poems, hummed songs, and rapped at gatherings in small venues around the city, like the October Gallery. "They were live, on-time, exciting, and on a mission to be heard," Sanchez wrote in Essence.

Once she decided to pursue a singing career, Scott contacted producer and DJ Jeff Townes—also known as Jazzy Jeff from his work with Fresh Prince Will Smith—and recorded seven songs with him. Her real break came when Ahmir Khalib Thompson, the drummer for the Roots who was also known as ?uestlove, heard Scott at one of her poetry performances. He invited her into the studio with the band, and she wound up co-writing the top 40 hit "You Got Me." The song earned a Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance for the Roots and Erykah Badu in 1999. Scott later collaborated with Will Smith on Willennium and with Common on Like Water for Chocolate. Her songs were also heard on a number of soundtracks, including those for the films Down to Earth, Kingdom Come, In Too Deep, and Wild, Wild West.

Scott's debut release, Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, was also the debut release for Hidden Beach, an upstart record label co-owned by basketball legend Michael Jordan. Scott's voice on the album was at times soothing and soulful, and she also occasionally used scat singing and the spoken word, recalling her poetry-jam days. Of her lyrics, she told Waldron, "These words have soul, conviction and woman behind them." Toure wrote in RollingStone.com, "The album is romantic soul music cool enough for the hip-hop generation and mature enough for our mothers." Although the media squeezed her comfortably into the "neosoul" R&B genre, Scott's description of her sound was more expressive: "I would definitely call it soul, because that's where it comes from, that's where the singing comes from, that's where the lyrics come from," she told Waldron. "It's a combination of jazz, R&B, country, hip hop, opera. It's every genre of music that I've ever heard." Scott initially released two singles from the album. "Love Rain," featuring rapper Mos Def, was an underground hit, while "Getting in the Way" found its way onto MTV and mainstream radio. For her effort, Scott received three Grammy Award nominations: Best New Artist, Best R&B Female Vocal Performance, and Best R&B Album of the Year.

Although she was featured on People magazine's list of the "50 Most Beautiful People in the World" in 2001, the singer went to great lengths to resist the pressures of the media to be thin and clad in designer clothes. She maintained her natural image—that of a healthy, happy woman who eats what she wants and wears what she chooses to wear. "We live in a society that says you have to be thin, you have to have a certain kind of hair and you have to have these expensive clothes to be considered attractive. Intelligence is third or fourth," she told Sanchez. "My intent has been to show myself completely and not hide behind the masks of fancy clothing, a lot of makeup, lots of jewelry."

After being sidelined briefly with a lung infection, Scott launched her own 27-city tour in the summer of 2001. She was backed by veteran jazz musicians, many of whom had performed with the likes of Roy Ayers, Anita Baker, and Aretha Franklin. These musicians gave Scott the support she needed to explore her talent onstage, and the result was a series of highly acclaimed live shows. After watching Scott in concert, singer Erykah Badu told Toure, "She's real sympathetic about humanity and the way that people treat other people. And her music takes me back to the grass roots. It's simple, whimsical, very dreamy. She sounds more like a horn than a singer. She makes me cry. She makes me feel me." In a shocking turn, Scott missed a string of tour dates when she temporarily lost 85 percent of her hearing in her right ear. She was diagnosed with Sudden Deafness Syndrome (S.D.S.).

For the Record …

Born c. 1972 in Philadelphia, PA; married Lyzel Williams (a graphic designer and deejay), 2001 (divorced). Education: Studied secondary education at Temple University.

Performed readings of her own poetry in North Philadelphia, early 1990s; toured Canada with Broadway musical Rent; co-wrote top 40 hit "You Got Me" with the Roots, 1999; collaborated with 4hero, Eric Benet, Common, Kenny Lattimore, and Will Smith; released debut album Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, 2000; completed 27-city solo tour, 2001; released live double album Experience: Jill Scott 826+, 2002; released Beautifully Human: Words and Sounds, Vol. 2, 2004, and The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3, 2007.

Awards: Soul Train Awards, Aretha Franklin Award for Entertainer of the Year, Best R&B/Soul Single for "A Long Walk," R&B/Soul Album of the Year for Who Is Jill Scott?, Best R&B, Soul, or Rap New Artist, 2001; Grammy Awards: Best Urban/Alternative Performance, for "Cross My Mind," 2004; Best Traditional R&B Vocal Performance (with George Benson and Al Jarreau), for "God Bless the Child," 2006.

Addresses: Record company—Hidden Beach Records, 3030 Nebraska Ave., Penthouse Ste., Santa Monica, CA 90404.Web site—Jill Scott Official Web site: http://www.jillscott.com/.

Scott released Experience: Jill Scott 826+, a two-disc live album, in 2002. The first disc was a blend of Scott favorites, recorded live primarily in Washington, D.C., on the 2001 tour. The songs included "A Long Walk," "One Is the Magic #," and "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)." A People critic commented that the disc "actually improves upon" the studio-recorded versions found on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1. The second disc featured ten previously unreleased songs, including "Gotta Get Up," "High Post Brotha," and "Gimme." The People critic noted that the new material "doesn't quite measure up" to her older work.

Scott returned in 2004 with Beautifully Human: Words and Sounds, Vol. 2, her second studio album. As with Who Is Jill Scott?, the album mixed jazz, soul, funk, and hip-hop in a series of poetic songs. When asked why she had waited four years to record her follow-up effort, Scott told OneDropRule.org: "I held out until I couldn't stand it anymore. The songs started waking me up and came to me during dinner or while I was in the tub or on walks. They weren't just one lyric here and there. They were complete songs. My hope was to make an album that was equally as good, but in a different way."

Beautifully Human was, like its predecessor, warmly received by the critics. "It's seamless in its construction, unlittered in its production, honestly and elegantly articulated in its poetic soul, and utterly intoxicating in its groove consciousness," wrote Thom Jurek in All Music Guide. Beautifully Human rose to number three on the Billboard 200 and number one on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.

Scott surprised fans in 2007 with The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3, an emotionally raw album that focused on the end of her relationship with her husband. "Her voice knows what every single emotion and feeling she sings about should sound like," wrote Isabelle Davis in WERS, "and as a result each of The Real Thing's fifteen cuts stand on their own as concrete slices of her psyche, but also manage to blend together to form a lush, smooth, bittersweet and therapeutic ride through the past year of her life."

Besides her work as a songwriter and singer, Scott also continued to write poetry, publishing The Moments, The Minutes, The Hours in 2005. She also won a Grammy Award in 2006 (with George Benson and Al Jarreau) for a vocal version of "God Bless the Child."

Speaking of her motivation as an artist, Scott told OneDropRule.org, "I really like to smile. I want to do things in my life that make my pores smile, and my nose and teeth smile. And when I feel that glow, I feel so much closer to God."

Selected discography

(Contributor) In Too Deep (soundtrack), Sony, 1999.

(Contributor) Wild Wild West (soundtrack), Interscope, 1999.

Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, Hidden Beach, 2000.

(Contributor) Down to Earth (soundtrack), Sony, 2001.

(Contributor) Kingdom Come (soundtrack), Gospo Centric, 2001.

Experience: Jill Scott 826+, Hidden Beach, 2002.

Beautifully Human: Words and Sounds, Vol. 2, Hidden Beach, 2004.

The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3, Hidden Beach, 2007.

Sources

Periodicals

Entertainment Weekly, February 16, 2001, p. 98.

Essence, January 2002, p. 84.

Jet, August 20, 2001, p. 58.

Newsweek, July 24, 2000, p. 63.

People, January 21, 2002, p. 33.

Time, July 24, 2000, p. 68.

Online

"Album Review: Jill Scott," WERS,http://www.wers.org (February 7, 2008).

"Jill Scott," All Music Guide,http://www.allmusic.com (July 2, 2002; February 7, 2008).

"Jill Scott," RollingStone.comhttp://www.rollingstone.com/artists/default.asp?oid=10705 (July 2, 2002).

"Jill Scott Interview," OneDropRule.Org,http://onedroprule.org (February 7, 2008).

Jill Scott Official Web site, http://www.experiencejillscott.com (July 2, 2002).

"Lovechild," Vibe.com,http://www.vibe.com/new/artist/20001201/index.html (July 2, 2002).

—Brenna Sanchez and Ronald D. Lankford, Jr.

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Scott, Jill

Jill Scott

Singer

For the Record

Selected discography

Sources

Singer, poet, and songwriter Jill Scott burst onto the neosoul/R&B scene in a blaze of glory following the release of her double-platinum-selling debut album, Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, in 2000. RollingStone.com writer Toure called Scott the premier female romantic voice of the neosoul era. The notoriously down-to-earth Philadelphia native found herself awash in Grammy Award nominations, appearing onstage with soul diva Aretha Franklin on VH-1, and opening for rock star Sting on his North American tour. But the sudden onslaught of success did not go to her head. Writer Clarence Waldron summed it up in Jet when he declared: Jill Scott is as real and honest as her down-home soul music. She is well-grounded and down-to-earthdespite her newfound stardom.

Scott was raised by her mother, Joyce Scott, and her grandmother, Blue Babe, in North Philadelphia. She was a very loved child, Joyce Scott told Toure in RollingStone.com, a fact that Jill Scott herself readily acknowledges. She remembers protective teenage boys in the neighborhood looking out for her, making sure she got home safely. Many of those boys, she recalled sadly in Essence, died from gunshot wounds. She later donated money for a computer lab to the elementary school she attended as a girl. She grew up listening to her grandmother humming tunes around the kitchen. She has had very little formal vocal training, but Scott has spent years listening to artists who inspire her singing style. She credits listening to singers like Sarah Vaughan, Donnie Hathaway, Minnie Riperton, and opera star Leontyne Price for helping her mold her vocal sound. I listened and I went to a class that included all that I needed to learn, Scott said in an interview with Sanchez for Essence. I wanted to learn voice techniques, how to breathe. I wanted to learn how to use the tools, but I didnt want them to take over and crush the spirit.

Scott began her career as a poet while studying at Temple University to become a high-school English teacher. When she first worked with children, Scott helped them learn how to spell by making up songs. The kids loved it, but her supervising teachers wrote her off as young and idealistic. Frustrated with her studies and a dead-end retail job while at Temple, Scott also pursued acting. At first she had balked when a friend suggested she should act, but when her first attempts were enjoyable and successful, she quit her job and dropped out of school to take an apprenticeship with a theater company. She ultimately landed the role in the Canadian touring production of the hit Broadway musical Rent. She worked a number of jobs to make ends meet during those struggling years. She did manual labor on a theater construction site, scooped ice cream, and cleaned toiletsanything that left her time to write and wasnt a typical nine-to-five office job. Scott was one among a number of promising Philadelphia poets who regularly recited their poems, hummed songs, and rapped at gatherings in small venues around the city, like the October Gallery. They

For the Record

Born c. 1972 in Philadelphia, PA; married Lyzel Williams (a graphic designer and deejay), 2001. Education: Studied secondary education at Temple University.

Performed readings of her own poetry in North Philadelphia, early 1990s; toured Canada with the Broadway musical Rent; co-wrote top-40 hit You Got Me with the Roots, 1999; collaborated with 4hero, Eric Benet, Common, Kenny Lattimore, and Will Smith; released debut album Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds Vol. 1, 2000; completed 27-city solo tour, 2001; released live double-album Experience: Jill Scott 826+, 2002.

Awards: Soul Train Awards, Aretha Franklin Award for Entertainer of the Year, Best R&B/Soul Single for A Long Walk, R&B/Soul Album of the Year for Who Is Jill Scott?, Best R&B, Soul, or Rap New Artist, 2001.

Addresses: Record company Hidden Beach Records, 3030 Nebraska Ave., Penthouse Suite, Santa Monica, CA 90404.Website Jill Scott Official Website: http://www.experiencejillscott.com.

were live, on-time, exciting, and on a mission to be heard, writer and poet Sonia Sanchez wrote in Essence.

Once she decided to pursue a singing career, Scott contacted producer and DJ Jeff Townesalso known as Jazzy Jeff from his work with Fresh Prince Will Smithand recorded seven songs with him. Her real break came after Ahmir Khalib Thompson, the drummer for the Roots who is also known as ?uestlove, heard Scott at one of her poetry performances. He invited her into the studio with the band, and she wound up co-writing the top-40 hit You Got Me. The song earned a Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance for the Roots and Erykah Badu in 1999. Scott later collaborated with Will Smith on Willennium and Common on Like Water for Chocolate. Her songs also can be heard on a number of soundtracks, including those for the films Down to Earth, Kingdom Come, In Too Deep, and Wild, Wild West.

Scotts debut release, Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds Vol. 1, was also the debut release for Hidden Beach, an upstart record label co-owned by basketball legend Michael Jordan. Scotts voice on the album is at times soothing and soulful, and she also occasionally scats and breaks into the spoken word, recalling her poetry-jam days. Her lyrics are emotional and personalThese words have soul, conviction and woman behind them, she said in the Jet interview with Waldron. The album is romantic soul music cool enough for the hip-hop generation and mature enough for our mothers, Toure wrote in RollingStone.com. Although the media squeezed her comfortably into the neosoul R&B genre, Scotts description of her sound is more expressive: I would definitely call it soul, be-cause thats where it comes from, thats where the singing comes from, thats where the lyrics come from she said in Jet. Its a combination of jazz, R&B, country, hip hop, opera. Its every genre of music that Ive ever heard. Scott initially released two singles from the album: Love Rain, featuring rapper Mos Def, was an underground hit, while Getting in the Way found its way onto MTV and mainstream radio. For her effort, Scott received three Grammy Award nominations: Best New Artist, Best R&B Female Vocal Performance, and Best R&B Album of the Year.

Although she was featured on People magazines list of the 50 Most Beautiful People in the World in 2001, the singer goes to great lengths to resist the pressures of the media to be thin and clad in designer clothes. She proudly maintains her natural imagethat of a healthy, happy woman who eats what she wants and wears what she chooses to wear. We live in a society that says you have to be thin, you have to have a certain kind of hair and you have to have these expensive clothes to be considered attractive. Intelligence is third or fourth, she told Sanchez in Essence. My intent has been to show myself completely and not hide behind the masks of fancy clothing, a lot of makeup, lots of jewelry. I dont want to hide behind any of those things. I want to be just who I am.

After being sidelined briefly with a lung infection, Scott launched her own 27-city tour in the summer of 2001. She was backed by veteran jazz musicians, many of whom had performed with the likes of Roy Ayers, Anita Baker, and Aretha Franklin. These musicians gave Scott the support she needed to explore herself on-stage, and the result was a series of highly acclaimed live shows. After watching Scott in concert, singer Erykah Badu told Toure in RollingStone.com, Shes real sympathetic about humanity and the way that people treat other people. And her music takes me back to the grass roots. Its simple, whimsical, very dreamy. She sounds more like a horn than a singer. She makes me cry. She makes me feel me. In a shocking turn, Scott missed a string of tour dates when she temporarily lost 85 percent of her hearing in her right ear. She was diagnosed with Sudden Deafness Syndrome (S.D.S).

Scott released Experience: Jill Scott 826+, a two-disc live album, in 2002. The first disc is a blend of Scott favorites, recorded live primarily in Washington, D.C., on the 2001 tour. These include A Long Walk, One Is the Magic#, and He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat). One People critic commented that the disc actually improves upon the studio-recorded versions found on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds Vol. 1. The second disc features ten previously unreleased songs, including Gotta Get Up, High Post Brotha, and Gimme. The People critic noted the new material doesnt quite measure up to her older work.

Selected discography

(Contributor) In Too Deep (soundtrack), Sony, 1999.

(Contributor) Wild Wild West (soundtrack), Interscope, 1999.

Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, Hidden Beach, 2000.

(Contributor) Down to Earth (soundtrack), Sony, 2001.

(Contributor) Kingdom Come (soundtrack), Gospo Centric, 2001.

Experience: Jill Scott 826+, Hidden Beach, 2002.

Sources

Periodicals

Entertainment Weekly, February 16, 2001, p. 98.

Essence, January 2002, p. 84.

Jet, August 20, 2001, p. 58.

Newsweek, July 24, 2000, p. 63.

People, January 21, 2002, p. 33.

Time, July 24, 2000, p. 68.

Online

Jill Scott, All Music Guide, http://www.allmusic.com (July 2, 2002).

Jill Scott, RollingStone.com, http://www.rollingstone.com/artists/default.asp?oid=10705 (July 2, 2002).

Jill Scott Official Website, http://www.experiencejillscott.com (July 2, 2002).

Lovechild, Vibe.com, http://www.vibe.com/new/artist/20001201/index.html (July 2, 2002).

Brenna Sanchez

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"Scott, Jill." Contemporary Musicians. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Scott, Jill." Contemporary Musicians. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/scott-jill

Scott, Jill

JILL SCOTT

Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, c. 1972

Genre: R&B

Best-selling album since 1990: Who Is Jill Scott?: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 (2000)

Hit songs since 1990: "Gettin' in the Way," "A Long Walk"


With an album that incorporates blues, jazz, modern R&B, poetry, and elements of hip-hop, Philadelphia street poet Jill Scott more than answered the question posed in the title of her 2000 debut, Who Is Jill Scott?: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1. The romantic, word-of-mouth album slowly caught fire and brought attention to the multitalented, honey-voiced vocalist, whose songwriting abilities had already earned her a Grammy Award before her debut hit the streets.

Born in Philadelphia in 1972, Jill Scott was an only child raised by her mother and grandmother. Subject to the abuse of her stepfather, Scott sought escape through writing, chronicling the vagaries of everyday life in her poetry, from the numbers in her school locker combination to run-ins with suspicious shopkeepers in her neighborhood. Scott was encouraged to keep writing her fly-on-the-wall observations by an eighth grade English teacher, who introduced her to the African-American poet Nikki Giovanni.

Scott majored in English at Temple University and continued writing her poetry and performing at the October Gallery coffee shop/art gallery, but soon found the drab confines of academia to be stifling to her creative drive and dropped out. Soon after, Scott formed a creative partnership with Philadelphia studio musician Scott Storch, with whom she wrote the song "You Got Me" for famed Philadelphia rap group the Roots. The song was featured on the Roots' 1999 album Things Fall Apart, with Scott's vocals replaced by singer Erykah Badu, who record label MCA thought would be a bigger, more commercial draw.

The song won a Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance in 1999 and, even though Scott felt burned by being replaced by Badu, the singer pressed forward, joining the Canadian cast of the Broadway musical "Rent" and plotting her own album. The Grammy acclaim brought her work writing songs for and with such R&B and hip-hop stars as Eric Benet, Will Smith, and Common.


The Rise of Neo-Soul and a Breakthrough Debut

By the late 1990s, Philadelphia had become a hub for a new generation of musicians who had picked up the mantle of the famed Philly International R&B label of the late 1960s and early 1970s, which had briefly made Philadelphia the apex of the funk/soul universe. A loose conglomeration of musicians calling themselves the "Soulquarians" (a combination of soul and Aquarians) began to create a fusion of jazz, soul, R&B, and hip-hop dubbed "neo-soul" by the media.

Along with the Roots and Badu, a member of the extended Soulquarians family was Jeff "Jazzy Jeff" Townes, who had come to fame in the 1980s with his partner, movie star and rapper Will "Fresh Prince" Smith. When Townes asked Scott to turn some music he had into a song, the singer returned several days later with the breakthrough hit from her debut, the jazz pop poem, "A Long Walk," which described Scott's first date with her fiancé-to-be. Ironically, on songs such as the sensual, loungey jazz track "Do You Remember," Scott's voice is a dead ringer for Badu's soulful delivery.

Those songs took their place on Who Is Jill Scott?: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 (2000), released in July by the California-based smooth jazz label Hidden Beach, founded by former Motown executive Steve McKeever. With middling promotion, the eighteen-track album began to gain a street buzz and was picked up for distribution several months later by major label Epic Records, selling half a million copies by October 2000.

Fans were wooed by Scott's combination of sassy spoken word ("Exclusively") and such languorous R&B/gospel kiss-offs as "Gettin' in the Way," in which Scott forcefully, and mellifluously, warns another woman to back off of her man or face the consequences. The album went on to sell more than 1 million copies and score three Grammy nominations. Scott was named one of People magazine's "50 Most Beautiful People" in 2001.

Scott feted Aretha Franklin at VH1's Divas Live in April 2001 and, ironically, picked up an Album of the Year Award at the Soul Train Lady of Soul Awards in August after organizers mistakenly announced the winner as Badu. The singer was the opening act for rock star Sting in the spring of 2001leaving the tour briefly with a lung infectionand released the two-CD set Experience: Jill Scott 826+, in November. The release features a live album with meandering jazz poems such as the twelve-minute "Love Rain (Suite)" and expanded, be-bopping versions of songs from her debut that find Scott in fine, brassy voice. The second disc contains ten new, loose-limbed studio recordings that critics said sound more like funky sketches for future songs than finished compositions.

After a one-year hiatus during which she took singing and music lessons and penned articles for Oprah and Grace magazines, Scott plotted a return in 2003 with a double album that integrated influences ranging from Qawwali devotional singing to opera and classical string sections.

In an age of pencil-thin R&B divas singing vapid, sexually charged songs written by someone else, full-figured Jill Scott was a refreshingly natural talent who not only wrote her own material but was also unafraid to tackle serious, thoughtful topics in her sung/spoken song poems. Despite comparisons to everyone from jazz singer Betty Carter to contemporary Erykah Badu, Scott brought a new vision and perspective to modern R&B.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 (Hidden Beach/Epic, 2000); Experience: Jill Scott 826+ (Hidden Beach/Epic, 2001).

gil kaufman

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"Scott, Jill." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Scott, Jill." Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Popular Musicians Since 1990. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/scott-jill