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Blur

Blur



Pop group



Although initial critical and commercial acclaim befell the British pop band Blur in the early 1990s, it was not until the 1994 release of Parklife that the foursome reached Top 40 status in the United States, while simultaneously receiving near Beatle-like attention at home. The record accomplished three feats: it launched Blur's alternative-band-of-the-moment status in America with the single "Girls & Boys"; it heralded the comeback of "Britpop" on both sides of the Atlantic; and it ignited a fierce rivalry between Blur and fellow English chart-toppers Oasis. The frenzied British music press focused on Blur in the wake of its international stardom, and their reportage stoked the sometimes-snide public rivalry between the two bands. Though Oasis eventually came out on top in terms of record sales, Blur has continued to grow with every album released, experimenting with different genres while maintaining a unique musical sound.

The sound of Blur often evokes comparisons with past English acts such as the Kinks and Madness. Like these predecessors, Blur combines wry lyrics with a slick pop-song construction, a formula that succeeded first in Britain and Europe, and later Stateside when the American music-buying public seemed ready to eschew the 1990s grunge aesthetic. Such music heralded the return of the clever, beat-driven tune, a trend seen by some industry-watchers as a revival of the 1960s British invasion (the Beatles, the Rolling Stones) or a resuscitation of the 1980s wave of U.K. invaders (Squeeze, the Smiths, Pet Shop Boys). Among those who saw the latter resemblance was Spin 's Rob Sheffield, who asserted, "Blur cultivates that new-wave look and sound, evoking the halcyon days of yore when London produced weekly pop sensations the way today's American colleges produce Superchunk clones."


Blur's origins actually lie in the last minor wave of British bands that made a mark on the pop/alternative music scene, the brief 1989-90 eruption of the Manchester soundalso known as the "baggy" bands for the roomy sartorial ensembles favored by some. Blur formed in the wake of success enjoyed then by acts like the Happy Mondays, Stone Roses, and Char-latans U.K. Unlike members of the northern English bands, however, the three founders of Blur all hail from Colchester, a suburb of London. The grouporiginally known as Seymourofficially coalesced when Damon Albarn met Graham Coxon and Dave Rowntree in art school in London. Alex James, a native of London, was recruited when they needed a bass player. The band was signed to Food Records in 1990 after playing only a few gigs. The Food label, backed by industry giant EMI, was run by Dave Balfe of the influential early 1980s band Teardrop Explodes.

Debut Single Rose "High"


Food released the band's first single in 1990. "She's So High" reached number two on the British independent charts, and the subsequent album, Leisure "with its moody batch of English-psychedelic but beat-heavy pop," as Rob O'Connor of Rolling Stone characterized itreached number seven on the British charts the day it was released.


Yet Leisure made little impact on the American record-buying public, selling only around 100,000 copies, probably because its Stateside release on SBK (another imprint of EMI) in 1991 coincided with the explosion of grunge. Suddenly, slick English pop bands were out of style, and American rock veteran Neil Young was being deified. Blur later admitted that there had been problems with their American management team, who didn't seem to know how to market the band. "When you're dealing with people who don't understand you and don't like your music, it gets to be a bit frustrating," Albarn explained to David Sprague in Rolling Stone in 1995. "From the first time we got off the plane in America, we knew that was the case."


Still, Blur remained content with success in England, putting out Modern Life Is Rubbish in 1992, a record with a slightly revamped sound that made a break from the laconic, jangly Manchester-style mood. The band, as Rolling Stone 's Steven Daly explained, "doffed their baggy apparel to reveal a penchant for well-scrubbed, melodic guitar pop." Unfortunately, Modern Life Is Rubbish fared less well when released in the United States in 1993, selling only 33,000 copies. Acts like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden were the big sellers that year, and Blur just didn't comprehend the appeal of grunge. "The last three or four years of American music has come from Prozac culture," Albarn said in Rolling Stone. "If you tell a whole nation it's dysfunctional, it becomes dysfunctional."

For the Record . . .

Members include Damon Albarn (born c. 1968 in Colchester, England), vocals; Graham Coxon (born c. 1968 in Colchester, England; left band, 2002), guitar; Alex James (born c. 1969 in London, England), bass; Dave Rowntree (born c. 1964 in Colchester, England), drums.


Group formed in London, England, c. 1990; originally named Seymour; signed with Food Records, 1990; released first single, "She's So High/I Know," 1990; released first album, Leisure, 1991; signed with Virgin Records, 1994; released The Great Escape, 1995; released Blur, 1997; released 13, 1999; Coxon left group, 2002; released Think Tank, 2003.


Awards: BRIT Awards, Best British Group, Best British Album for Parklife, Best British Video, Best British Single, 1995; NME Premier Awards, Best Band, Best Single for "Tender," Best Video for "Coffee and TV," 2000; Q Magazine Awards, Best Album for Think Tank, 2003.


Addresses: Record company Virgin Records, 338 N. Foothill Rd., Beverly Hills, CA 90210. Website Blur Official Website: http://www.blur.co.uk.


A Big Hit in the United States


However, by the time their third album, Parklife, was released in the summer of 1994 in the Statesafter selling nearly a million copies in the U.K.alternative music fans were ready for a change. Launched with the catchy single "Girls & Boys"described by Billboard writers Craig Rosen and Dominic Pride as "a pastiche of mindless Eurodisco"it also boasted a production job by Stephen Street, who had made a name for himself doing the boardwork for Morrissey. Much of Parklife was written after Albarn read British novelist Martin Amis's apocalyptic vision of future England, London Fields.

Parklife surpassed sales expectations in the United States. "Girls & Boys" reached number four on Billboard 's Modern Rock chart and helped make the albumand Blura hit in the U.S. "The album comes over like some hopped-up pop opera, a potent collection of dance-floor stompers and sweeping ballads that sparkle with knowing winks at English pop stylists from the Small Faces to Wire to Madness," remarked Daly in Rolling Stone. A reliance on verbosity in Blur's lyrics also seemed to be characteristic. "We're the sort of band that likes to have a bit of a chinny-wag about what our songs are about," Albarn explained to Sprague in Rolling Stone. "That comes from an art-school tradition where you're trained to talk endlessly about why you got up this morning."

The year 1995 was an especially heady one for Blur. In February they became the first act to win four Brit Awards, the British equivalent of the Grammy. In June they switched their American label from SBK to Virgin, a company better equipped to market the band's accessibly alternative sound. By this time, the British tabloids were chronicling every move of the band, and especially that of doe-eyed lead singer Albarn. In addition, much was made of the animosity between Blur and Oasisa rivalry that had reached a frenzied pitch by year's end. New York Times contributor Simon Reynolds attempted to shed some light on the situation: "Underlying the bad blood is class and regional antagonisms. Blur is from the south of England and middle class, yet its members are infatuated with London proletarian lifestyles. Oasis, in contrast, is from the northern city of Manchester, and its members are the genuine working-class article. What both bands have in common is a dedication to resurrecting the lost glory of quintessentially English pop."


Competed for Top of the Pop Charts


The competition for chart position between Blur and Oasis escalated when Blur released The Great Escape in September of 1995, right around the time when Oasis was also launching new material. It was Blur's first single, "Country House"not the new release from Oasisthat debuted at number one on the charts there. The entire album was released in the U.S. shortly thereafter. "The Great Escape somehow manages to be both experimental and dated, favoring the densely detailed arrangements and quirky production effects of groups like XTC and Squeeze," assessed Reynolds. Sprague, writing in Rolling Stone, also saw The Great Escape 's appeal. "Aside from the odd lapse into Cockney slang, the thematically seamless LP could speak to anyone left deadened by the bleakness of suburbia on either side of the Atlantic," the critic declared.

The Great Escape was praised by critics, and Blur's profile was raised on both sides of the Atlantic. However, even though the first single off the album, "Country House," entered the charts ahead of a single released by Oasis at the same time, Oasis ultimately went on to win over the elusive American audience with their mega-popular 1996 release, (What's the Story) Morning Glory? Blur took a year off following the relatively disappointing sales of The Great Escape.


Instead of breaking up, Blur used their year off to re-evaluate their approach to music, ultimately deciding to take a cue from American indie rock and employ a lo-fi, guitar-driven style of songwriting. This time, their success was reversedtheir fifth album (self-titled Blur ) was more popular in the United States than their previous albums had been, but the British public gave it a cool reception. Frustrated, the band returned to the studio with yet another approach in mind.


Experimented with Electronica


The group's next album, the electronica-tinged 13, produced by William Orbit (the man behind Madonna's foray into electronica, Ray of Light ) and released in 1999, was met with a lukewarm reception. Some criticized the band for leaving their guitar-heavy style of the past for the machine-made beats of 13, noting that the golden age of electronica had already come and gone.


Guitarist and founding member Graham Coxon was unceremoniously asked to leave the band in 2002. Coxon, though upset, immediately moved on with his burgeoning solo career. "I felt disappointed about the way the other guys in Blur went about getting rid of me," Coxon confessed to Europe Intelligence Wire reporter Pete Clark. Still, he added, "I don't miss being in Blur. I certainly don't have any regrets about being in the group, but I don't miss it." Coxon continued the solo career he began with his 1998 debut Sky Is Too High. He released Golden D in 2000, but his greatest success was his first post-Blur release, 2002's The Kiss of Morning.


Blur soldiered on without Coxon. Their 2003 release Think Tank was a step further into the electronic realm. People reviewer Kyle Smith commented: "[Blur] has abandoned zingy pop (it never caught on in the U.S. anyway) and moved on to an icy Euro-electronica like a teenager trading his comic books for Jean-Paul Sartre." Underlying the electronic pulse, though, Smith identified "an understated, atmospheric prettiness that at times recalls the aching beauty of the Scottish band Belle and Sebastian," that set the band apart from other would-be electronic bands. Time International music reviewer Hugh Porter simply declared it Blur's "most mature and accomplished album to datewith or without [Coxon]."



Selected discography

Leisure, SBK, 1991.

Modern Life Is Rubbish, SBK, 1993.

Parklife, SBK, 1994.

The Great Escape, Virgin, 1995.

Blur, EMI, 1997.

13, Virgin, 1999.

Think Tank, Virgin, 2003.



Sources

Periodicals


Billboard, February 18, 1995; September 23, 1995; May 3, 2003.

Entertainment Weekly, May 9, 2003.

Europe Intelligence Wire, October 17, 2002.

Fortune, April 26, 1999.

Guitar Player, October 1994.

Music & Media, April 19, 2003.

New York Times, October 22, 1995.

New Statesman, May 12, 2003.

People, June 9, 1997; May 19, 2003.

Rolling Stone, February 6, 1992; June 30, 1994; November 3, 1994; November 2, 1995.

Spin, August 1994.

Time, March 29, 1999.

Time International, May 12, 2003.

Village Voice, August 2, 1994.


Online


"BBC Radio 1 Artist: Blur," British Broadcasting System, http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio1/artist_area/blur/ (December 20, 2003).

"Blur," All Music Guide, http://www.allmusic.com (December 17, 2003).

Blur Official Website, http://www.blur.co.uk (December 12, 2003).

"Blur's Award Hat Trick," BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/627190.stm (December 20, 2003).

"Graham Coxon," All Music Guide, http://www.allmusic.com (December 17, 2003).


Carol Brennan

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Blur

Blur

Rock band

For the Record

The Manchester Sound

Success in the States

The U.K.s Favorite

Selected discography

Sources

Although initial critical and commercial acclaim befell the British pop band Blur in the early 1990s, it was not until the 1994 release of Parklife that the foursome reached Top 40 status in the United States, while simultaneously receiving near Beatle-like attention at home. The record accomplished three feats: it launched Blurs alternative-band-of-the-moment status in America with the single Girls & Boys it heralded the comeback of Britpop on both sides of the Atlantic; and it ignited a fierce rivalry between Blur and fellow English chart-toppers Oasis. The frenzied British music press focused on Blur in the wake of its international stardom, and their reportage stoked the sometimes-snide public rivalry between the two bands; proclamations issuing forth from Blurs lead singer, Damon Albarn, as well as the minutiae of his relationship with Elastica f rontperson Justine Frischmann, provided additional journalistic fodder.

The sound of Blur often evokes comparisons with past English acts such as the Kinks and Madness. Like these predecessors, Blur combines wry lyrics with a slick

For the Record

Members include Damon Albarn (born c. 1968 in Colchester, England), vocals; Graham Coxon (born c. 1968 in Colchester, England), guitar; Alex James (born c. 1969 in London, England), bass; and Dave Rowntree (born c. 1964 in Colchester, England), drums.

Group formed c. 1990 in London, England; originally named Seymour; signed with Food Records, 1990; released first single, Shes So High/I Know, 1990; released first album, Leisure, 1991; signed with Virgin Records, 1994.

Awards: Received four Brit Awards, 1995.

Addresses: Record company Virgin Records, 338 N. Foothill Rd., Beverly Hills, CA 90210.

pop-song construction, a formula that succeeded first in Britain and Europe, and later Stateside when the American music-buying public seemed ready to eschew the 90s grunge aesthetic. Such music heralded the return of the clever, beat-driven tune, a trend seen by some industry-watchers as a revival of the 60s British invasion (the Beatles, the Rolling Stones) or a resuscitation of the 80s waveof U.K. invaders (Squeeze, the Smiths, Pet Shop Boys). Among those who saw the latter resemblance was Spins Rob Sheffield, who asserted, Blur cultivates that new-wave look and sound, evoking the halcyon days of yore when London produced weekly pop sensations the way todays American colleges produce Superchunk clones.

The Manchester Sound

Blurs origins actually lie in the last minor wave of British bands that made a mark on the pop/alternative music scene, the brief 1989-90 eruption of the Manchester soundalso known as the baggy bands for the roomy sartorial ensembles favored by some. Blurformed in the wake of success enjoyed then by acts like the Happy Mondays, Stone Roses, and Charlatans U.K. Unlike members of the northern English bands, however, the three founders of Blur all hail from Colchester, a suburb of London. The grouporiginally known as Seymour officially coalesced when Damon Albarn met Graham Coxon and Dave Rowntree in art school in London. Alex James, a native of London, was recruited when they needed a bass player. The band was signed to Food records in 1990 after playing only a few gigs. The Food label, backed by industry giant EMI, was run by Dave Balfe of the influential early 80s band Teardrop Explodes.

Food released the bands first single in 1990. Shes So High reached Number Two on the British independent charts, and the subsequent album, Leisure with its moody batch of English-psychedelic but beat-heavy pop, as Rob OConnor of Rolling Stone characterized itreached Number Seven on the British charts the day it was released.

Yet Leisure made little impact on the American record-buying public, selling only around 100,000 copies, probably because its Stateside release on SBK (another imprint of EMI) in 1991 coincided with the explosion of grunge. Suddenly, slick English pop bands were out of style, and American rock veteran Neil Young was being deified. Blur later admitted that there had been problems with their American management team, who didnt seem to know how to market the band. When youre dealing with people who dont understand you and dont like your music, it gets to be a bit frustrating, Albarn explained to David Sprague in Rolling Stone in 1995. From the first time we got off the plane in America, we knew that was the case.

Still, Blur remained content with success in England, putting out Modern Life Is Rubbishin 1992, arecord with a slightly revamped sound that made a break from the laconic, jangly Manchester-style mood. The band, as Rolling Stones Steven Daly explained, doffed their baggy apparel to reveal a penchantfor well-scrubbed, melodic guitar pop. Unfortunately, Modern Life Is Rub-bish fared less well when released in the United States in 1993, selling only 33,000 copies. Acts like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden were the big sellers that year, and Blur just didnt comprehend the appeal of grunge. The last three or four years of American music has come from Prozac culture, Albarn said in Rolling Stone. If you tell a whole nation its dysfunctional, it becomes dysfunctional.

Success in the States

However, by the time their third album, Parklife, was released in the summer of 1994 in the Statesafter selling nearly a million copies in the U.K.alternative music fans were ready for a change. Launched with the catchy single Girls & Boysdescribed by Billboard writers Craig Rosen and Dominic Pride as a pastiche of mindless Eurodiscoit also boasted a production job by Stephen Street, who had made a name for himself doing the boardwork for Morrissey. Much of Parklife was written after Albarn read British novelist Martin Amiss apocalyptic vision of future England, London Fields.

Parklife surpassed sales expectations in the United States. Girls & Boys reached Number Four on Billboards Modern Rock chart and helped make the albumand Blura hit in the U.S. The album comes over like some hopped-up pop opera, a potent collection of dance-floor stompers and sweeping ballads that sparkle with knowing winks at English pop stylists from the Small Faces to Wire to Madness, remarked Daly in Rolling Stone. A reliance on verbosity in Blurs lyrics also seemed to be characteristic. Were the sort of band that likes to have a bit of a chinny-wag about what our songs are about, Albarn explained to Sprague in Rolling Stone. That comes from an art-school tradition where youre trained to talk endlessly about why you got up this morning.

The U.K.s Favorite

The year 1995 was an especially heady one for Blur. In February they became the first act to win four Brit Awards, the equivalent of the Grammy. In June they switched their American label from SBK to Virgin, a company better equipped to market the bands accessibly alternative sound. By this time, the British tabloids were chronicling every move of the band, and especially that of doe-eyed lead singer Albarn. I n addition, much was made of the animosity between Blur and Oasisa rivalry that had reached a frenzied pitch by years end. New York Times contributor Simon Reynolds attempted to shed some light on the situation: Underlying the bad blood is class and regional antagonisms. Blur is from the south of England and middle class, yet its members are infatuated with London proletarian lifestyles. Oasis, in contrast, is from the northern city of Manchester, and its members are the genuine working-class article. What both bands have in common is a dedication to resurrecting the lost glory of quintessentially English pop.

The competition for chart position between Blur and Oasis escalated when Blur released The Great Escape in September of 1995, right around the time when Oasis was also launching new material. It was Blurs first single, Country Housenot the new release from Oasisthat debuted at Number One on the charts there. The entire album was released in the U.S. shortly thereafter. The Great Escape somehow manages to be both experimental and dated, favoring the densely detailed arrangements and quirky production effects of groups like XTC and Squeeze, assessed Reynolds. Sprague, writing in Rolling Stone, also saw The Great Escapes appeal. Aside from the odd lapse into Cockney slang, the thematically seamless LP could speak to anyone left deadened by the bleakness of suburbia on either side of the Atlantic, the critic declared.

American tour dates were booked for much of 1996 to coincide with further releases of tracks from The Great Escape. Blur seems content to stay true to the formula that has made them such an international success. Yet the band remains philosophical about their star status. The notion of being a pop star in the 90s is an anachronism, really, Albarn observed in the interview with Sprague. Its a bit like being the last of the dinosaurs. Ive got this feeling that when the millennium rolls around, some comet will wipe out any of us that have survived. Except U2, of course. Like cockroaches, they can survive anything.

Selected discography

Leisure, SBK, 1991.

Modern Life Is Rubbish, SBK, 1993.

Parklife, SBK, 1994.

The Great Escape, Virgin, 1995.

Sources

Billboard, February 18, 1995; September 23, 1995.

Face, January 1996.

Guitar Player, October 1994.

New York Times, October 22, 1995.

Rolling Stone, February 6, 1992; June 30, 1994; November 3, 1994; November 2, 1995. Spin, August 1994.

Village Voice, August 2, 1994.

Carol Brennan

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Blur

BLUR

Formed: 1989, Colchester, England

Members: Damon Albarn, vocals (born Whitechapel, London, England, 23 March 1968); Graham Coxon, guitar (born Rinteln, Hannover, Germany, 12 March 1969); Alex James, bass (born Bournemouth, Dorset, England, 21 November 1968); Dave Rowntree, drums (born Colchester, Essex, England, 8 May 1964).

Genre: Rock

Best-selling album since 1990: Blur (1997)

Hit songs since 1990: "There's No Other Way," "Girls and Boys," "Song 2"


The British guitar-based rock band Blur started off in the 1990s in the alternative rock scene. They saw their popularity peak in the United States with their eponymous fifth album in 1997. Blur's cheeky sense of humor, often pointed at England's class structure, interpersonal relationships, and the vagaries of life, is their hallmark, along with the clever wordplay and psychedelic swaths of guitar found in their music. During its heyday, Blur wrote great dance music, evident in songs such as "She's So High," "Girls and Boys," and "Number 2."

Band members Damon Albarn, Graham Coxon, and Alex James met at Goldsmiths College in the late 1980s; they met drummer Dave Rowntree, whose father was a sound engineer for the Beatles at the British Broadcasting Company, in London after college. Blur developed a small following in the United States among British pop enthusiasts, thanks to the song "She's So High" (1990), which found its way into the U.K. charts. Many of Blur's songs adeptly and cleverly skewer class stratification, politics, and pop culture, but much of their guitar-driven material also deals with the typical pop music fare of love and relationships. At this time, their music was guitar-driven and accented with a Hammond organ. Blur became a popular choice for deejays at dance clubs known for playing alternative music. The band was also a large part of the Manchester rock scene, which was comprised of other similar bands such as Charlatans U.K., Ride, and Lush. "There's No Other Way," another melodic and danceable guitar-heavy single, hit number eight on the U.K. charts in the spring of 1991. Both tracks appeared on their debut Leisure (1991) and helped the album sneak into the U.K. Top 50. Their follow-up, the cheekily titled Modern Life Is Rubbish (1993), emerged after the band struggled in 1992 to present an album that pleased their record label. A typical example of the sophomore slump, Modern Life Is Rubbish sold less than their debut.

Parklife (1994), Blur's third album, brought greater record sales both in the United Kingdom and the United States; it borrows heavily from just about every great British pop band of the twentieth century, including the Kinks, the Who, and the Beatles. The album's Euro-disco tune "Girls and Boys" is Blur at its best and seems to celebrate, or make fun of, sexual ambiguity. In his unmistakable Cockney accent, Albarn sings the circular chorus, "Girls who are boys / Who like boys to be girls / Who do boys like they're girls / Who do girls like they're boys / Always should be someone you really love." Parklife earned Blur a nomination for the prestigious Mercury Music Prize, and they won Best Band and Best Album at the 1995 Brit Awards.

After these musical coups, the famously incendiary British press schemed to create an Oasis versus Blur campaign. Oasis, a rock band heavily influenced by the Beatles and comprised mostly of the notoriously misanthropic brothers Liam and Noel Gallagher, had released a single the same day as Blur in August 1995. The fans caught on, and for the most part, Blur kept quiet as Oasis, cocksure and aggressively ambitious, gained constant headlines. The feud was more or less nonexistent on American shores, and in truth Blur and Oasis are completely different pop bands. Oasis thrives on the notoriety of its feuding brothers. Blur was always the sly, detached observer interested in creating sonic textures and social commentary, while Oasis was the instigator.

Blur never reclaimed the critical success they found after Parklife. However, their self-titled fifth album (1997) became their best-selling record in the United States, thanks to the thrashy song "Number 2." The song inspired teenagers to jump up and down, crash into each other, and occasionally hoist someone up in the air to ride the crowd in a practice known as moshing. In 1999 they released the electronica-heavy 13, produced mostly by William Orbit and recorded without Coxon, who unofficially left to release his own material in 1998. Albarn released an album with hip-hop producers under the moniker the Gorillaz, and it is uncertain whether Blur will record an album together again.

In the 1990s, guitar band Blur was a significant player in what critics and music industry types were calling a "British Invasion," à la the Beatles in the 1960s. With their cerebral, dispassionate lyrics and knack for creating melodic hooks that stick in the listener's head, Blur managed to succeed, despite stiff competition from fellow Brits Oasis throughout most of the 1990s.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Leisure (Virgin, 1991); Modern Life Is Rubbish (Virgin, 1993); Parklife (Virgin, 1994); The Great Escape (Virgin, 1995); Blur (Virgin, 1997); 13 (Virgin, 1999).

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

S. Maconie, Blur 3862 Days: The Official Story (London, 2002).

carrie havranek

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blur

blur / blər/ • v. (blurred , blur·ring ) make or become unclear or less distinct: [tr.] tears blurred her vision. • n. a thing that cannot be seen or heard clearly: the words were a blur. ∎  an indistinct memory or impression of events, typically because they happened very fast: the day before was a blur. DERIVATIVES: blur·ry adj.

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blur

blur sb. and vb. smear, stain. XVI. of unkn. orig.

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blur

blur •à deux, agent provocateur, astir, auteur, aver, bestir, blur, bon viveur, burr, Chandigarh, coiffeur, concur, confer, connoisseur, cordon-bleu, cri de cœur, cur, danseur, Darfur, defer, demur, de rigueur, deter, entrepreneur, er, err, farceur, faute de mieux, fir, flâneur, Fleur, force majeure, fur, hauteur, her, infer, inter, jongleur, Kerr, littérateur, longueur, masseur, Monseigneur, monsieur, Montesquieu, Montreux, murre, myrrh, occur, pas de deux, Pasteur, per, pisteur, poseur, pot-au-feu, prefer, prie-dieu, pudeur, purr, raconteur, rapporteur, refer, répétiteur, restaurateur, saboteur, sabreur, seigneur, Sher, shirr, sir, skirr, slur, souteneur, spur, stir, tant mieux, transfer, Ur, vieux jeu, voyageur, voyeur, were, whirr

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