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Winston, Stan 1946(?)–

WINSTON, Stan 1946(?)–

PERSONAL

Full name, Stanley Winston; born April 7, 1946 (some sources cite 1948), in Richmond, VA; married Karen, c. 1969; children: Matthew "Matt" (an actor), Debbie. Education: Attended University of Virginia. Avocational Interests: Automobiles, motorcycles.

Addresses: Office—Stan Winston Productions, 17216 Saticoy St., P.O. Box 346, Van Nuys, CA 91406. Agent—David Gersh, The Gersh Agency, 232 North Canon Dr., P.O. Box 5617, Beverly Hills, CA 90210.

Career: Special effects artist, makeup artist, director, producer, writer, and costume designer. Walt Disney Studios, began career as apprentice to Robert Schiffer until 1972; Digital Domain (visual effects and digital production studio), Los Angeles, founder (with James Cameron and Scott Ross), 1993, and affiliate, 1993–98; Stan Winston Productions, Van Nuys, CA, founder and president, 1997—; Stan Winston Studios, founder and president; SW Digital, president. Creator of special effects and special makeup effects for both commercials and music videos, notably the Mr. Roboto character in an award–winning music video by Styx; best known for his creature designs; also worked as an assistant director and visual effects supervisor. Free Arts for Abused Children, member of the board of directors.

Awards, Honors: Emmy Award (with others), outstanding makeup, 1972, for Gargoyles; Emmy Award (with others), outstanding makeup, 1974, for The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman; Emmy Award, outstanding makeup, 1975, for Masquerade; Emmy Award nomination (with others), outstanding individual achievement in children's programming, 1977, for Pinocchio; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding achievement in makeup, 1977, for An Evening with Diana Ross: The Big Event; Emmy Award nomination, outstanding makeup, 1977, for Roots; Saturn Award nomination, Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, best makeup, 1979, for The Wiz; Academy Award nomination and Saturn Award nomination, both best makeup, 1982, for Heartbeeps; Saturn Award nomination, best makeup, 1982, for Dead & Buried; Saturn Award, best makeup, 1985, for The Terminator; Academy Award (with others), best visual effects, Saturn Award (with others), best special effects, and Film Award (with others), British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best special visual effects, all 1987, and DVD Exclusive Award nomination, best audio commentary, 2003, all for Aliens; Academy Award nomination (with others), best visual effects, 1988, for Predator; Paris Film Festival Award, best first–time director, 1988, for Pumpkinhead; Academy Award nomination (with Ve Neill), best makeup, 1991, and Film Award nomination, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best special visual effects, 1992, both for Edward Scissorhands; Academy awards, best visual effects (with others) and best makeup (with Jeff Dawn), Saturn Award, best special effects, and Film Award (with others), British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best special visual effects, all 1992, for Terminator 2: Judgment Day; Saturn Award (with others), best makeup, Academy Award nomination (with others), best makeup, and Film Award nomination (with Neill), British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best makeup, all 1993, for Batman Returns; Academy Award (with others), best visual effects, Saturn Award (with others), best special effects, and Film Award (with others), British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best special effects, all 1994, for Jurassic Park; Film Award nomination (with others), British Academy of Film and Television Arts, best makeup and hair, 1995, for Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles; Academy Award nomination (with others), best visual effects, 1998, for The Lost World: Jurassic Park; Catalonian International Film Festival Award (with Stefen Fangmeier), best special effects, 1998, for Small Soldiers; Saturn Award nominations (both with others), best special effects and best makeup, 2000, for Galaxy Quest; Hollywood Makeup Artist and Hair Stylist Guild Award nomination (with Mike Smithson), best special effects makeup for a feature film, 2000, for Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me; received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, 2001; Saturn Award (with others), best special effects, and Academy Award nomination (with others), best visual effects, both 2002, for Artificial Intelligence: AI; Lifetime Achievement Award, Las Vegas Film Critics Society, 2004.

CREDITS

Film Work; Special Effects Artist and Makeup Artist:

W. C. Fields and Me, Universal, 1976.

Edward Scissorhands, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1990.

Terminator effects production, Terminator 2: Judgment Day (also known as T2, T2—Terminator 2: Judgement Day, T2: Extreme Edition, T2: Ultimate Edition, El Exterminator 2, and Terminator 2—Le jugement dernier), TriStar, 1991.

Special penguin makeup effects, Batman Returns, Warner Bros., 1992.

Vampire makeup, Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (also known as Interview with the Vampire), Warner Bros., 1994.

The Island of Dr. Moreau, New Line Cinema, 1996.

(With John Bruno and James Cameron) Terminator and animatronics effects creator, Terminator 2: 3–D (also known as T2 3–D: Battle across Time and T2: Terminator 2:3–D), 1996.

Animatronic and creature effects, Galaxy Quest, DreamWorks SKG, 1999.

Animatronics designer and robot character designer, Artificial Intelligence: AI (also known as A.I.: Artificial Intelligence), Warner Bros., 2001.

Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (also known as T2 and Terminator 3—Rebellion der Maschinen), Warner Bros., 2003.

Wrong Turn, Twentieth Century–Fox, 2003.

Constantine, Warner Bros., 2005.

Film Work; Special Effects Artist:

Creature effects, Parasite, Embassy, 1982.

Prosthetics, White Dog, Paramount, 1982.

Special Terminator creator, The Terminator, Orion, 1984.

Starman transformation, Starman (also known as John Carpenter's Starman), Sony Pictures Releasing, 1984.

Aliens, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1986.

Invaders designer and creator, Invaders from Mars, Cannon, 1986.

Creature effects, Predator, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1987.

Monster designer, The Monster Squad, TriStar, 1987.

Creature designer, Leviathan, Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer, 1989.

Creature creator, Predator 2, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1990.

Live action dinosaur designer, Jurassic Park, Universal, 1993.

Gorilla special effects, Congo, Paramount, 1995.

Ripper designer, Tank Girl, United Artists, 1995.

Creatures effects, The Relic (also known as Das Relikt), Paramount, 1996.

Live and animatronic effects, The Ghost and the Darkness, Paramount, 1996.

Animatronic creature design and effects, Mouse Hunt (also known as Mousechase), DreamWorks SKG, 1997.

Live action dinosaur designer, The Lost World: Jurassic Park (also known as The Lost World), Universal, 1997.

Paulie, DreamWorks SKG, 1998.

Animatronic design and effects, Small Soldiers, Dream-Works SKG, 1998.

Creature designer, End of Days, MCA/Universal, 1999.

Creature effects, Lake Placid (also known as Lac Placid), Twentieth Century–Fox, 1999.

Special animatronic effects, Inspector Gadget, Buena Vista/Walt Disney, 1999.

Special character effects, Instinct, Buena Vista, 1999.

Live action dinosaur designer, Jurassic Park III (also known as JP3), Universal, 2001.

Tooth fairy designer, Darkness Falls (also known as Don't Peek, The Ghost of Matilda Dixon, Tooth Fairy, and The Tooth Fairy: The Ghost of Matilda Dixon), Columbia, 2003.

Film Makeup Artist:

The Bat People (also known as It Lives by Night and It's Alive), 1974.

The Man in the Glass Booth, American Film Theatre, 1975.

Dr. Black, Mr. Hyde (also known as Dr. Black and Mr. Hyde, Dr. Black and Mr. White, and The Watts Monster), 1976.

Dracula's Dog (also known as Zoltan, Hound of Dracula), Crown International, 1977.

Mansion of the Doomed (also known as Eyes, Eyes of Dr. Chaney, House of Blood, Massacre Mansion, and The Terror of Dr. Chaney), Group 1 International, 1977.

The Wiz, Universal, 1978.

The Exterminator, Avco–Embassy, 1980.

Dead & Buried, Avco–Embassy, 1981.

Heartbeeps, Universal, 1981.

The Entity, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1982.

The Thing (also known as John Carpenter's The Thing), Universal, 1982.

The Adventures of a Gnome Named Gnorm (also known as A Gnome Named Gnorm and Upworld), PolyGram Video, 1992.

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, New Line Cinema, 1999.

Pearl Harbor (also known as Pearl Harbour), Buena Vista, 2001.

Planet of the Apes (also known as The Visitor), Twentieth Century–Fox, 2001.

Film Director:

Pumpkinhead (also known as Vengeance: The Demon), Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer/United Artists, 1988.

The Adventures of a Gnome Named Gnorm (also known as A Gnome Named Gnorm and Upworld), PolyGram Video, 1992.

Michael Jackson's "Ghosts" (short film; also known as Ghosts), Sony, 1996.

(With John Bruno and James Cameron) Terminator 2: 3–D (also known as T2 3–D: Battle across Time and T2: Terminator 2:3–D), 1996.

Film Producer:

Michael Jackson's "Ghosts" (short film; also known as Ghosts), Sony, 1996.

Wrong Turn, Twentieth Century–Fox, 2003.

(With others) Me and My Monster, Sony Pictures Entertainment, 2005.

Film Work; Other:

Special makeup consultant, The Hand, 1981.

Second unit director, Congo, Paramount, 1995.

Costume designer, The Relic (also known as Das Relikt), Paramount, 1996.

Creature effects supervisor, End of Days, MCA/Universal, 1999.

Special effects director, Big Fish, Columbia, 2003.

Film Appearances:

Himself in closing credits, Michael Jackson's "Ghosts" (short film; also known as Ghosts), Sony, 1996.

Television Work; Series:

Makeup artist, Masquerade Party, syndicated, 1974.

Special effects artist, Manimal, NBC, 1983.

Television Work; Miniseries:

Makeup artist, Roots, ABC, 1977.

Special creature effects artist, Creature (also known as Peter Benchley's Creature), ABC, 1998.

Television Producer; Movies:

The Day the World Ended, HBO, 2001.

Earth vs. the Spider, Cinemax, 2001.

How to Make a Monster, HBO, 2001.

Mermaid Chronicles Part 1: She Creature (also known as She Creature), HBO, 2001.

(Uncredited) Teenage Caveman, Cinemax, 2002.

Television Makeup Artist; Movies:

Gargoyle makeup, Gargoyles (also known as The New CBS Tuesday Night Movies), CBS, 1972.

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, CBS, 1974.

Unwed Father, ABC, 1974.

The Two Worlds of Jennie Logan, 1979.

Phantom of the Opera, 1983.

Chiller, 1985.

Television Special Effects Artist; Movies:

Seizure: The Story of Kathy Morris, 1980.

The Day the World Ended, HBO, 2001.

Earth vs. the Spider, Cinemax, 2001.

How to Make a Monster, HBO, 2001.

Mermaid Chronicles Part 1: She Creature (also known as She Creature), HBO, 2001.

Teenage Caveman, Cinemax, 2002.

Television Work; Specials:

Makeup artist, Pinocchio, CBS, 1976.

Makeup artist, "An Evening with Diana Ross," The Big Event (also known as An Evening with Diana Ross: The Big Event), NBC, 1977.

Costume designer for Wookie family, The Star Wars Holiday Special, 1978.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Detective Nick, A Pocket for Corduroy, 1986.

The Making of "Alien 3," 1992.

The Making of "Terminator 2: Judgment Day," 1992.

The 12 Most Fascinating People of 1993, ABC, 1993.

The Wonderful World of Disney: 40 Years of Television Magic, ABC, 1994.

(Uncredited) Alien Autopsy: Fact or Fiction?, 1995.

Hollywood Halloween, 1997.

Ray Harryhausen: Working with Dinosaurs, 1999.

The Making of "Terminator 2: 3–D," 2000.

AFI's 100 years, 100 Thrills: America's Most Heart–Pounding Movies, CBS, 2001.

Inside "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines," Sci–Fi Channel, 2003.

Television Work; Episodic:

Makeup artist, "Go to the Head of the Class," Amazing Stories, NBC, 1986.

Television Work; Pilots:

Makeup supervisor, Get Christie Love!, ABC, 1974.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Guest, "Hollywood's Robots," Movie Magic, The Discovery Channel, 1997.

RECORDINGS

Videos:

Designer of Mr. Roboto, Kilroy Was Here (also known as Caught in the Act), 1983.

T2: More than Meets the Eye, 1993.

The Making of "Jurassic Park," 1995.

The Making of "Lost World," 1997.

The Thing: Terror Takes Shape (also known as John Carpenter's The Thing: Terror Takes Shape), 1998.

Beyond Jurassic Park, Universal Studios Home Video, 2001.

The Dinosaurs of "Jurassic Park III" (also known as The New Dinosaurs of "Jurassic Park III"), Universal Studios Home Video, 2001.

If It Bleeds We Can Kill It: The Making of "Predator," Twentieth Century–Fox Home Entertainment, 2001.

The Making of "Jurassic Park III," Universal Studios Home Video, 2001.

Other Voices: Creating "The Terminator," Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer Home Entertainment, 2001.

The Special Effects of "Jurassic Park III," Universal Studios Home Video, 2001.

AI: A Portrait of Gigolo Joe, 2002.

The Robots of "AI," 2002.

Eliza Dushku: Babe in the Woods, Twentieth Century–Fox Home Entertainment, 2003.

Fresh Meat: The Wounds of "Wrong Turn," Twentieth Century–Fox Home Entertainment, 2003.

Stan Winston: Monster Mogul, Twentieth Century–Fox Home Entertainment, 2003.

Stan Winston's Dead & Buried EFX, Blue Underground, 2003.

Superior Firepower: The Making of "Aliens," Twentieth Century–Fox Home Entertainment, 2003.

Music Videos:

Designer of Mr. Roboto character, "Mr. Roboto," by Styx, 1983.

WRITINGS

Screenplays:

(Story) Pumpkinhead (also known as Vengeance: The Demon), Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer/United Artists, 1988.

Michael Jackson's "Ghosts" (short film; also known as Ghosts), Sony, 1996.

OTHER SOURCES

Periodicals:

Movieline, November, 1994.

Starlog, September, 1995; July, 1997.

Electronic:

Stan Winston Official Site,http://www.stanwinstonstudio.com, July 4, 2004.

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"Winston, Stan 1946(?)–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Winston, Stan 1946(?)–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/winston-stan-1946

"Winston, Stan 1946(?)–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved April 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/winston-stan-1946

Winston, Stan

WINSTON, Stan



Makeup and special effects artist. Nationality: American. Born: Virginia, c. 1946. Career: 1969—Walt Disney Studios makeup department; 1971–1977—freelance televsion and motion picture makeup and prosthetic effects artist; 1978—Stan Winston Studio; 1993—Digital Domain. Awards: Academy Award, Aliens, 1986 (effects); Academy Award, Terminator 2: Judgement Day, 1991 (effects, makeup); Jurassic Park, 1993 (effects); Emmy Award, Gargoyles, 1972 (makeup); The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, 1974 (makeup).


Films as Director:

1988

Pumpkinhead

1991

Adventures of a Gnome Named Gnorm

1996

T2 3-D: Battle Across Time

1997

Ghosts

Films as Makeup and Special Effects Artist:

1972

Gargoyles (television)

1974

Masquerade (television); The Autiobiograhy of Miss Jane Pittman (television)

1975

The Man in the Glass Booth

1976

Pinocchio (television); W. C. Fields and Me

1977

An Evening with Diana Ross (television); Roots (television)

1978

The Wiz

1980

The Exterminator

1981

Dead and Buried; Heartbeeps; The Hand

1982

The Thing; Parasite

1983

Something Wicked This Way Comes

1984

The Terminator; Starman

1985

The Vindicator

1986

Aliens; Invaders from Mars

1987

Monster Squad; Predator

1988

Alien Nation

1989

Leviathan

1990

Edward Scissorhands; Predator 2

1991

Terminator 2: Judgement Day

1992

Batman Returns

1993

Jurassic Park

1994

Interview with the Vampire

1995

Tank Girl; Congo

1996

The Island of Dr. Moreau

1999

Instinct; Lake Placid; Inspector Gadget; End of Days; Galaxy Quest

Publications


On WINSTON: articles—

Hogan, D. J., "How Makeup Expert Stan Winston Solved an Unusual Effects Problem on The Entity," in Cinefantastique, no. 5, 1983.

Salza, G. "Bio-filmografia dei nuovi tecnici di effetti special," in Segnocinema, January 1986.

Genild, P., "Effektive Marsmonstre," in Levende Billeder, 1 June 1987.

Vincenzi, L., "A New Direction," in Millimeter, September 1987.

Magid, R., "A Planetful of Aliens," in Cinefex, November 1988.

Pollack, Andrew, "Computer Images are Staking Out Star Roles in Movies," in The New York Times, 24 July 1991.

Duncan, J., "A Once and Future War," in Cinefex, August 1991.

Stephens, C., "Master of Animatronics & Makeup," in On Production, no. 5, 1992.

Moerk, Christian, "Jurassic Looks Like an f/x Classic; Tech Industry Expects Pic to Revolutionize Field," in Variety, 7 February 1992.

McGowan, Chris, "IBM, Movie Veterans Enter Digital Technology Domain," in Billboard, 3 April 1993.

Biodrowski, S., "Stan Winston," in Cinefantastique, no. 2, 1993.

Duncan, J., "The Beauty in the Beasts," in Cinefex, August 1993.

Magid, R., "Effects Team Brings Dinosaurs Back from Extinction," in American Cinematographer, June 1993.

Impoco, Jim, "Big Blue Goes Hollywood," in U.S. News and World Report, 19 September 1994.

Johnson, Ross, "Winston Gratification," in The Hollywood Reporter, 16 June 1995.

Diorio, Carl, "Mighty Morphin," in The Hollywood Reporter, 16 June 1995.

Duncan, Jody, "Moreau's Menagerie," in Cinefex (Riverside), December 1996.

Duncan, Jody, "On the Shoulders of Giants," in Cinefex (Riverside), June 1997.


* * *

Stan Winston, has, at various points in his career, been typecast as a makeup artist, a special effects whiz, a computer animator, and a puppeteer. Yet, while all of these terms are accurate, they do little to either define the man or his unique art. He is perhaps most accurately described as a storyteller and a creator of characters. In fact, his resume includes creating memorable persona in some of the biggest grossing films in the world including Aliens, Terminator 2, Batman Returns, and Jurassic Park. He has even directed two creature-based films, Pumpkinhead and Adventures of a Gnome Named Gnorm. As a result of an early fascination with the acting profession, focused in particular on those roles that involved bizarre characters such as werewolves or Jekyll and Hyde transformations, Winston discovered that it could be more fulfilling to go beyond human actors playing parts and to actually create artificial characters that could act. As a result, he now bases his creations, whether puppets, computer images or prosthetic makeup effects, within the context of the performances being given by live actors in a well-told story. Audiences, he believes, do not walk out of a movie theater remembering makeup or creature effects. They will remember them only if they are a realistic part of a ground-breaking story or paired with an actor's powerful performance.

He points to 1986's Aliens as a case in point. Although, he constructed 15 warrior aliens for the film, it was his full scale 14-foot tall Queen Alien who came to life and slugged it out with the film's star Sigourney Weaver "live on the set" and helped her to achieve an Academy Award nominated performance. Although the Queen rig was operated by a two man crew assisted by a cable rig and a team of cable controllers, in Winston's view, his technicians were actors giving a performance in creating the alien character who would take part on an equal basis with any other performer in the film. In the finished film, the Queen emerges as an actual character. According to Winston, she comes across as elegant in her form, feminine but nasty—definitely a woman you do not want to mess with.

What makes Winston unique in a profession that thrives on labeling its practitioners and forcing them into pigeonholes is that he is constantly reinventing himself and his craft. Early in his career, he carved out a reputation as a makeup artist who specialized primarily in realistic facial prosthetics. However, building on his childhood experiences with puppetry, he graduated to the more specialized field of makeup effects and was soon designing characters with animated faces that were controlled and operated externally. He then extended the external animation to the entire creature, pioneering the new art form of animatronics and robotic design which was to reach its high point through his collaborations with director James Cameron on Terminator 2 and Steven Spielberg on Jurassic Park. At the Stan Winston Studio which he founded in 1978, Winston's staff routinely works with images of virtually every creature existing in nature including man. The characteristics of these creatures are then excerpted and incorporated in designs of beings that have no existence outside of the imagination. Yet, the reality of these new creatures is heightened by the fact that they reflect expressions, gestures, and movements that build on the audiences' own memories and experiences. Regardless of how exotic the creature is, whether alien or Terminator, something about it is strangely familiar to the viewer. The bottom line, Winston emphasizes, is to do what has never been done before—to take the writer's wildest ideas and somehow turn them into cinematic reality—on a daily basis.

Winston's art was expanded in 1993 when he teamed with Industrial Light and Magic designer Scott Ross and director James Cameron to form Digital Domain, a firm focusing on digital and other "high tech" special effects for motion pictures. D.D.'s first project was the fall 1994 release Interview with the Vampire which Winston considered to be a major turning point in his career.

Although he had started out successfully as a makeup artist, he had become typecast as a "creature maker" as a result of the phenomenal success of Jurassic Park. He had to literally do some fast talking to get the job. "I realized that there were still things that I wanted to try with subtle nuances of makeup but nobody would give me the chance because I was the guy who does dinosaurs," he stated in 1995. "That job was very important to me."

Winston's reason for selecting Vampire was his profound interest in creating characters. Director Neil Jordan's film called for a more subtle, elegant, almost spiritual type of effect than did a film dealing with 20-ton dinosaurs. The merger of makeup and small scale mechanical effects with the computer's potential for creating and cloning realistic images extended Winston's range in a remarkable way. Winston's studio took care of the prosthetics, makeup and the mechanical effects—one of which was a crawling robotic Tom Cruise in Lestat's near death scene—while Digital Domain provided computer-generated imagery, miniatures and digital compositing.

From an artistic point of view, the blending of puppetry with computer animation, usually results in the computer getting the credit. For example, out of 16 minutes of dinosaur footage in Jurassic Park, 60 percent was actually Winston's full-size creatures and not electronic images. Similarly, in Interview With the Vampire, the prosthetic and mechanical touches were seamlessly interwoven with the computer-generated effects. Yet, most viewers credited the work to Industrial Light and Magic's computers in the former and to Digital Domain in the latter, because the effects were simply too realistic to be puppets.

However, Winston sees this as vindication of his approach to creature building. He views the computer and other technological innovations as simply new tools to help with the creation of characters in order to create an undetectable blend between what is alive and what's on computer. In Winston's view, if he has done his job correctly, the mechanical characters and the computer-generated images are no less real than the human actors appearing in the finished product. The bottom line is that all three have to be able to act and to make the viewer believe in them. "If you look at a film that I have contributed to," he says, "and my work is apparent, I have failed. But, if it is instead identifiable as a Tim Burton, a James Cameron, or Steven Spielberg film, that's a pat on the back to me."

—Steve Hanson

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"Winston, Stan." International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Winston, Stan." International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers. . Retrieved April 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/movies/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/winston-stan