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Hare, David 1947-

Hare, David 1947-

PERSONAL

Original name, David Rippon; born June 5, 1947, in St. Leonard, Sussex, England; son of Clifford Theodore (a sailor) and Agnes (maiden name, Gilmour) Rippon; married Margaret Matheson (a theatrical agent), August 7, 1970 (divorced, 1980); married Nicole Farhi (a designer), 1992; children: (first marriage) Lewis and Darcy (twins), Joe. Education: Attended Lancing College, Sussex, England; Jesus College, University of Cambridge, M.A. (with honors), 1968.

Addresses:

Agent—Casarotto Marsh Ltd., National House, 60-66 Wardour St., London W1V 4ND United Kingdom.

Career:

Writer, director and producer. Portable Theatre (traveling company), founder (with Tony Bicat) and director, 1968-71; Royal Court Theatre, London, literary manager, 1969-70, resident dramatist, 1970-71; Nottingham Playhouse, Nottingham, England, resident dramatist, 1973; Joint Stock Theatre Group (traveling company), cofounder (with David Aukin and Max Stafford-Clark) and director, 1975-80; Greenpoint Films, founder, 1983; National Theatre, London, associate director, 1984-88, and 1989—; Berlin International Film Festival, member of jury, 1997.

Member:

Royal Society of Literature (fellow), Dramatists Club.

Awards, Honors:

Evening Standard Drama Award, 1970, for Slag; John Llewellyn Rhys Award, Book Trust (England), 1975, for Knuckle; Television Award, best television play, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, 1978, for Licking Hitler; New York Drama Critics Circle Award, best foreign play, Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best play, 1983, both for Plenty; C.I.C.A.E. Award, Interfilm Award—Honorable Mention, and Golden Berlin Bear, all Berlin International Film Festival, 1985, all for Wetherby; City Limits Award, Plays and Players Best Play award (with Howard Brenton), and Evening Standard Drama Award (with Brenton), all 1985, for Pravda: A Fleet Street Comedy; Plays and Players Best Play award, Drama magazine Best Play award, both 1988, and Drama Desk Award nomination, best play, 1990, all for The Secret Rapture; Time Out Theatre Award, Laurence Olivier Award, best play, Society of London Theatre, Plays and Players Best Play award, London Critics Circle Award, best play, all 1990, and Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best play, 1996, all for Racing Demon; Laurence Olivier Award, best play, 1996, New York Drama Critics Circle Award, best foreign play, Antoinette Perry Award nomination, best play, 1997, all for Skylight; Officier de l'ordre des Arts et Lettres, 1997; Laurence Olivier Theatre Award, best new play, 1998, for Amy's View; Outer Critics Circle Award, outstanding solo performance, and Drama Desk Award, best one person solo show, both 1999, for Via Dolorosa; BBC Award, Laurence Oliver Theatre Awards, best new play, 1999, for The Blue Room; New York Drama Critics Circle Award, 1999, for "contributions to the 1998-99 season," BBC Award nomination, Laurence Oliver Theatre Awards, best new play, 2001, for My Zinc Bed; Writers Guild of America, best screenplay adaptation, 2002, Golden Globe Award nomination, best screenplay, Academy Award nomination, best writing—screenplay based on material previously produced or published, 2003, all for The Hours; Drama Desk Award nomination, outstanding play, 2006, Lucille Lortel Award nomination, outstanding play, League of Off-Broadway Theatres and Producers, 2007, both for Stuff Happens.

CREDITS

Stage Director:

Inside Out, Arts Laboratory, London, 1968.

Purity, Canterbury, England, 1969.

Fruit, London, 1970.

Christie in Love, Portable Theatre Company, Brighton, England, 1969, then in London, 1970.

Blow Job, Edinburgh, Scotland, and London, 1971.

England's Ireland, Mickery Theatre, Amsterdam, then Roundhouse Theatre, London, 1972.

Brassneck, Nottingham Playhouse, Nottingham, England, 1973.

The Pleasure Principle, Theatre Upstairs, London, 1973.

The Provoked Wife, Watford, Herfordshire, England, 1973.

Teeth 'n Smiles, Royal Court Theatre, London, 1975.

Weapons of Happiness, National Theatre, London, 1976.

Devils Island, Royal Court Theatre, 1977.

Plenty, National Theatre, 1978, then Arena Stage, Washington, DC, 1980, later New York Shakespeare Festival, Estelle R. Newman Theatre, Public Theatre, 1982, and Plymouth Theatre, New York City, 1983.

Total Eclipse, Lyric Theatre, London, c. 1981.

A Map of the World, Adelaide Festival, Adelaide, Australia, 1982, then Lyttelton Theatre, National Theatre, 1983, later Estelle R. Newman Theatre, Public Theatre, 1985.

Pravda: A Fleet Street Comedy, Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, 1985-86.

King Lear, Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, beginning in 1986.

The Bay at Nice and Wrecked Eggs (double bill), Cottesloe Theatre, National Theatre, 1986-87.

The Knife (opera), Estelle E. Newman Theatre, 1987.

The Secret Rapture, Lyttelton Theatre, National Theatre, 1988, then Estelle R. Newman Theatre, and later Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York City, 1989.

Racing Demon, Cottesloe Theatre, then Olivier Theatre, both National Theatre, 1990.

My Zinc Bed, Royal Court Theatre, 2000.

The Year of Magical Thinking, produced at Booth Theatre, New York City, 2007.

Stage Appearances:

Via Dolorosa (solo show), Royal Court Theatre, London, 1998, then Booth Theatre, New York City, 1999.

Film Work:

Director, Wetherby, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, 1985.

Director, Paris by Night, Cineplex Odeon, 1988.

Director, Strapless, Granada, 1989.

Associate producer, The Secret Rapture, Castle Hill, 1993.

Director and producer, The Designated Mourner, First Look Pictures, 1997.

Film Appearances:

Via Dolorosa, 2000.

Himself, The Papp Project (documentary), American Masters, 2001.

Himself, Memories of: Elephant (short), Blue Underground, Inc., 2004.

Himself, John Osborne and the Gift of Friendship, NBD Television, 2006.

Television Work; Movies:

Associate producer, Saigon: Year of the Cat, Thames Television, 1983.

Director, Heading Home, BBC and Arts and Entertainment, 1992.

Television Director; Specials:

Licking Hitler, 1974.

Television Director; Episodic:

"Licking Hitler," Play for Today, BBC1, 1978.

"Dreams of Leaving," Play for Today, BBC1, 1980.

"Paris, May 1919," The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, ABC, 1993.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Presenter, The 53rd Annual Tony Awards, CBS, 1999.

Alan Clarke: His Own Man, 2000.

The Evening Standard Theatre Awards 2003, ITV, 2003.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

"Anthony Hopkins/David Hare," The South Bank Show, ITV, 1987.

Changing Stages, PBS, 2000.

"Cate Blanchett," Bravo Profiles, Bravo, 2002.

Breakfast with Frost, BBC1, 2002.

"Sir Peter Hall: Part 2," The South Bank Show, ITV, 2005.

WRITINGS

Stage Plays:

(With Tony Bicat) Inside Out (one-act; adapted from diaries of Franz Kafka), produced at Arts Laboratory, London, 1968.

How Brophy Made Good (one-act), produced at Brighton Combination Theatre, Brighton, England, 1969, published in Gambit, 1970.

What Happened to Blake, produced in London, 1970.

Slag (two-act), first produced at Hampstead Theatre Club, London, 1970, then Estelle R. Newman Theatre, Public Theatre, New York City, 1971, published by Faber & Faber, 1971.

(With Howard Brenton, Brian Clark, Trevor Griffiths, Stephen Poliakoff, Hugh Stoddart, and Snoo Wilson) Lay By (one-act) first produced at Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1971, then Open Space Theatre, London, 1971, published by Calder & Boyars, 1972.

The Rules of the Game (three-act; adapted from a play by Luigi Pirandello), produced at National Theatre, London, 1971.

(With others) England's Ireland, first produced at Mickery Theatre, Amsterdam, then Roundhouse Theatre, London, both 1972.

The Great Exhibition (two-act), produced at Hampstead Theatre Club, 1972, published by Faber & Faber, 1972.

(With Brenton) Brassneck (three-act), produced at Nottingham Playhouse, Nottingham, England, 1973, published by Methuen, 1974.

Knuckle (two-act), first produced at Comedy Theatre in the West End, London, 1974, then Phoenix Theatre, New York City, 1975, published by Faber & Faber, 1974, revised edition, 1978.

Fanshen (two-act; adapted from William Hinton's Fanshen: A Documentary of Revolution in a Chinese Village), produced at I.C.A. Theatre, London, 1975, published by Faber & Faber, 1976.

Teeth 'n Smiles (two-act), produced at Royal Court Theatre, London, 1975, published by Faber & Faber, 1976.

Plenty (two-act), first produced at National Theatre, 1978, then Arena Stage, Washington, DC, 1980, later New York Shakespeare Festival, Estelle R. Newman Theatre, 1982, and Plymouth Theatre, New York City, 1983, published by Samuel French, 1978.

(With others) Deeds, produced in Nottingham, 1978, published in Plays and Players, 1978.

A Map of the World, first produced at the Adelaide Festival, Adelaide, Australia, 1982, then Lyttelton Theatre, National Theatre, 1983, later Estelle R. Newman Theatre, 1985, published by Faber & Faber, 1982, revised edition, 1983.

(With Brenton) Pravda: A Fleet Street Comedy, produced at Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, 1985, published by Methuen, 1985.

The Bay at Nice and Wrecked Eggs (double bill), produced at Cottesloe Theatre, National Theatre, 1986, published by Faber & Faber, 1986.

The Knife (book for opera), produced at Estelle R. Newman Theatre, 1987.

The Secret Rapture, first produced at Lyttelton Theatre, National Theatre, 1988, then Estelle R. Newman Theatre, and later Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York City, 1989, published by Grove, 1989.

Racing Demon, first produced at Cottesloe Theatre, then Olivier Theatre, both National Theater, 1990, later New York, 1995, published by Faber & Faber, 1990.

Murmuring Judges, produced at Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, 1992, published by Faber & Faber, 1991.

The Absence of War, produced at National Theatre, London, 1993.

The Life of Galileo (adapted from a work by Bertolt Brecht) produced at Almeida Theatre, London, 1994.

Mother Courage and Her Children (adapted from Brecht's work Mutter Courage und Ihre Kinder), produced in London, 1995, published by Arcade, 1996.

Skylight, first produced at National Theatre, 1995, then New York City, 1996, published by Faber & Faber, 1995, and Samuel French, 1997.

Ivanov (adapted from a work by Anton Chekhov), first produced at Almeida Theatre, then New York City, 1995.

Amy's View, produced at Royal National Theatre, London, 1997, then Ethel Barrymore Theatre, New York City, 1999, published by Faber & Faber, 1998.

The Blue Room (adapted from La Ronde by Artur Schnitzler), produced at Donmar Theatre, London, 1998, published by Grove, 1998.

The Judas Kiss, produced at The Playhouse, London, 1998, published by Grove, 1998, and Samuel French, 1999.

Via Dolorosa, produced at Royal Court Theatre, London, 1998, then Booth Theatre, New York City, 1999.

My Zinc Bed, produced at Royal Court Theatre, 2000.

The Breath of Life, produced at Theatre Royal, London, 2002.

The Permanent Way, produced at National Theatre, 2004.

Stuff Happens, produced at National Theatre, 2004, then Mark Taper Forum, Los Angeles, 2005, Joseph Papp Public Theatre, Public Theatre, New York City, 2006, published by Faber and Faber, 2004.

The Vertical Hour, produced Music Box Theatre, New York City, 2006-2007.

The Year of Magical Thinking, produced at Booth Theatre, 2007.

Also wrote La Opinion de Amy.

Screenplays:

Plenty (based on his play of the same title), Twentieth Century-Fox, 1985.

Wetherby, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, 1985.

Paris by Night, Cineplex Odeon, 1988.

Strapless, Granada, 1989.

Damage (also known as Fatale and Verhangnis), New Line Cinema, 1992.

The Secret Rapture (based on his play of the same title), Castle Hill, 1993.

The Island of Dr. Moreau, New Line Cinema, 1996.

Via Dolorosa (based on his play of the same title), 2000.

The Hours, Castle Hill, 2001.

Murder in Samarkand, 2008.

Television Movies:

Saigon: Year of the Cat, Thames Television, 1983.

Heading Home, Arts and Entertainment and BBC, 1992.

The Absence of War, 1995.

My Zinc Bed, HBO, 2008.

Television Specials:

Man above Men, BBC, 1973.

Licking Hitler, 1974.

Dreams of Leaving, BBC, 1980.

Nonfiction:

Writing Lefthanded (essays), Faber & Faber, 1991.

Asking Around: Background to the David Hare Trilogy (notes on plays), Faber & Faber, 1993.

Acting Up: A Diary, Faber & Faber, 1999.

OTHER SOURCES

Books:

Contemporary Dramatists, 6th ed., St. James Press, 1999.

International Dictionary of Theatre, Volume 2: Playwrights, St. James Press, 1993.

Periodicals:

American Theatre, January, 1999, p. 64.

Film Comment, September-October, 1985, p. 18.

Interview, April, 1989.

New York Times, October 22, 1989, p. H5.

New York Times Magazine, September 29, 1985.

Playbill, March 31, 2003, pp. 21-22.

Time, March 15, 1999, p. 81.

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"Hare, David 1947-." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Hare, David 1947-." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved May 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/hare-david-1947

Hare, David

David Hare, 1947–, British playwright. Hare is a prominent member of the British theatrical left. A founder of the Portable Theatre and the Joint Stock, he became resident dramatist and literary manager of the Royal Court Theatre, London (1967–71), and at the Nottingham Playhouse (1973). His plays are personal dramas, often presented in a historical context. Among the best of his early works is Teeth 'n' Smiles (1975), a satirical commentary on the state of modern British society. He achieved wide critical and popular acclaim with Plenty (1978), a dramatic tour-de-force for its female star, which deals with disillusionment in post–World War II Britain. Pravda (1985), a satire on journalism, was written with his sometime collaborator Howard Brenton. The 1998–99 Broadway season marked a peak in Hare's success, featuring productions of The Judas Kiss,The Blue Room, and Amy's View, as well as a one-man play, Via Dolorosa, performed by Hare. The Breath of Life (2002) is a caustic study of two women in late middle age abandoned by the same man, roles originated in London by Dames Judi Dench and Maggie Smith. Stuff Happens (2004) is a bitingly topical examination of the Iraq war, repeatedly updated, with actors playing George W. Bush, Tony Blair, Colin Powell, and other real-life characters. The Iraq war is also central to The Vertical Hour (2006), the first of Hare's plays to debut on Broadway. He has also written and directed films and television dramas.

See his Acting Up (1999).

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"Hare, David." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Hare, David

Hare, David (1947– ) English playwright and director. He collaborated with Howard Brenton on Pravda (1985), a study of media corruption. Hare wrote a ‘State of the Nation’ trilogy on the British establishment: Racing Demon (1990) on the Church of England; Murmuring Judges (1991) on the legal system; and The Absence of War (1993) on politics. His screenplays include Plenty and Wetherby (both 1985). Other works include Via Dolorosa (1998) and The Blue Room (1999).

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"Hare, David." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Hare, David." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved May 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/hare-david