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Rowe, Nicholas 1966–

ROWE, Nicholas 1966–

(Nick Rowe)

PERSONAL

Born November 22, 1966, in Edinburgh, Scotland (one source says London, England); son of Andrew (a politician and editor) and Alison (a singer) Rowe. Education: Attended University of Bristol.

Addresses:

Agent—Lucy Brazier, Peters Fraser & Dunlop, 34–43 Russell St., London WC2B 5HA, England.

Career:

Actor. Worked as a market researcher in London.

CREDITS

Film Appearances:

(As Nick Rowe) Spungin, Another Country, Orion, 1984.

Title role, Young Sherlock Holmes (also known as Pyramid of Fear), Paramount, 1985.

"J", Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (also known as Two Smoking Barrels), Gramercy, 1998.

Jeremy, Hit List (short film), 2000.

Maidanov, All Forgotten (also known as Lover's Prayer), Seven Hills Productions, 2000.

Villiers, Enigma (also known as Enigma—Das geheimnis), Manhattan Pictures International, 2002.

Lord Verisopht, Nicholas Nickleby, Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer, 2002.

Harry, Girl on a Cycle, 2003.

Lawyer, Seed of Chucky, Rogue Pictures, 2004.

Television Appearances; Series:

(As Nick Rowe) Boyer, The Fugitives, ITV (England), 2005.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

David Pennistone, A Dance to the Music of Time, Channel 4 (England), 1997.

King George III, Longitude, Arts and Entertainment, 2000.

Professor Gibberne, The Infinite Worlds of H. G. Wells, Hallmark Channel, 2001.

Thomas Orde–Lees, Shackleton, Arts and Entertainment, 2002.

Duke of Buckingham, La Femme Musketeer, Hallmark Channel, 2004.

Television Appearances; Movies:

Captain Gilliand, "Sharpe's Enemy," Sharpe II, PBS, 1994.

Richard Hull (some sources cite David Ball), True Blue (also known as Miracle at Oxford), NBC, 1996.

Lord Edward Fitzmaurice, "Poldark," Mystery!, PBS, 1996.

Gervase Butt, Dalziel and Pascoe: An Autumn Shroud, Arts and Entertainment, 1996.

Dr. Gerry Saddler, Outside the Rules, BBC1 (England), 2002.

Ambassador, Princes in the Tower, Channel 4, 2005.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Tennessee Shad, The Prodigious Mr. Hickey (also known as The Lawrenceville Stories: The Return of Hickey and The Prodigious Mr. William Hicks), PBS, 1987.

Tennessee Shad, The Beginning of the Firm, PBS, 1989.

Gui De Chauliae, World's Worst Century, Channel 4 (England), 2004.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Kevin Wright, "Lemon Twist," Pie in the Sky, 1995.

Charles Beaufort (some sources cite Beaulon), "Blood Money," Kavanagh QC, ITV (England), 1997.

Charles Beaufort (some sources cite Beaulon), "Diplomatic Baggage," Kavanagh QC, ITV, 1997.

Dan Spearill, "The Long Weekend," Dangerfield, BBC (England), 1998.

Julian Desire, "Murder," Let Them Eat Cake, BBC, 1999.

Peter Graham, "The Last Knight," Relic Hunter, syndicated, 2000.

Nathan Cairns, "Desperate Measures," Holby City, BBC, 2003.

David Heartley–Reade, "The Fisher King," Midsomer Murders, Arts and Entertainment, 2004.

Stage Appearances:

Guildenstern, Hamlet, Almeida Theatre Company, Belasco Theatre, New York City, 1995.

OTHER SOURCES

Periodicals:

People Weekly, February 3, 1986, pp. 89–90.

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"Rowe, Nicholas 1966–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rowe, Nicholas 1966–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/rowe-nicholas-1966

"Rowe, Nicholas 1966–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/rowe-nicholas-1966

Rowe, Nicholas

Nicholas Rowe (rō), 1674–1718, English dramatist. An ardent Whig, he was able to gain various government posts during the course of his life. In 1715 he became poet laureate. His first two plays, The Ambitious Stepmother (1700) and Tamerlane (1701), established his reputation as a popular playwright. Soon afterward he wrote his best plays, The Fair Penitent (1703) and Jane Shore (1714); both are stories of men's cruelty to women that prefigure the domestic tragedies popular later in the 18th cent. Rowe is also well known for his edition of Shakespeare (1709), which supplied valuable textual and biographical data and divided the plays into acts and scenes.

See J. Canfield, Nicholas Rowe and Christian Tragedy (1977)

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"Rowe, Nicholas." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Rowe, Nicholas." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rowe-nicholas

"Rowe, Nicholas." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rowe-nicholas