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Campbell, John Archibald

Campbell, John Archibald (1859–1909). Scots architect. He commenced practice in Glasgow with J. J. Burnet in 1886, and practised alone from 1897 to 1909 when he entered into partnership with Alexander David Hislop (1876–1966). Shawlands Old Parish Church, Pollokshaws Road (1885–9), is an essay in First Pointed, with a defensive street elevation and a dramatic north elevation facing Shawlands Cross in which parts of Dunblane Cathedral were quoted, but the Barony Church (1886–9— now the ceremonial hall of Strathclyde University) is a masterpiece of First Pointed, much influenced by the work of Pearson (who was adjudicator during the architectural competition) and again with quotations from Dunblane: in both of these Glaswegian works Burnet was deeply involved. On his own account Campbell designed the mighty office building at 157-67 Hope Street, on the corner with West George Street (1902–3), the great height of which relies on load-bearing masonry with cast-iron columns supporting steel beams spanning between internal brick piers. His last independent work was the office building at 84–94 St Vincent Street, Glasgow, the city's first steel-framed building, with a Portland Stone front.

Bibliography

Das Werk ;
Williamson,, Riches,, & and Higgs (1990)

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"Campbell, John Archibald." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Campbell, John Archibald." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/campbell-john-archibald

Burnet, David Gouverneur

David Gouverneur Burnet (gŭv´ənŏŏr´ bûr´nĬt), 1788–1870, provisional president of Texas (1836), b. Newark, N.J.; son of William Burnet (1730–91). He went to Texas c.1817, and his legal training enabled him to become a spokesman for the American settlers there as dissension with the Mexican government grew. Appointed (1834) a district judge, he opposed the measures of the Mexican government and was gradually led to favor the independence of Texas from Mexico. In 1836 he drew up the declaration of independence at the convention at Washington-on-the-Brazos, where he was made president ad interim of Texas. His eight-month administration in the chaotic times during and after the revolution (see Texas) was not effective. He quarreled bitterly with Sam Houston and thereafter opposed him in politics. Burnet was vice president under Mirabeau B. Lamar, was defeated by Houston for the presidency in 1841, and was chosen in 1866 (because he had opposed secession) U.S. Senator from Texas in the Reconstruction era, but was denied his seat.

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Burnet, David Gouverneur

BURNET, DAVID GOUVERNEUR

David Gouverneur Burnet centered his career efforts in Texas.

Burnet was born April 4, 1788, in Newark, New Jersey. Before entering politics, Burnet served under Francisco de Miranda in 1806 in an endeavor to liberate Venezuela from Spain. He also studied law and pursued careers in business and speculation.

Burnet relocated to Texas and presided as a Texas district judge in 1834. In 1836 he participated at the Washington-on-the-Brazos Convention, where he drafted the Texas Declaration of Independence; in 1836 he served as the president ad interim of the Republic of Texas. He subsequently resigned, but returned to perform the duties of vice president. From 1846 to 1847 he acted as the secretary of state of Texas, the first person to hold such a position in the newly formed state.

Burnet died December 5, 1870, in Galveston, Texas.

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"Burnet, David Gouverneur." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Burnet, David Gouverneur." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/burnet-david-gouverneur