Skip to main content
Select Source:

Anastasia

Anastasia female forename, deriving from the Greek, Anastasis ‘Resurrection’. Anastasia was the name of the youngest daughter (1901–?18) of the last tsar of Russia, now thought to have died with the rest of her family at Yekaterinburg; for many years there were rumours that one or more of the family had escaped the massacre, and a number of claimants appeared.
St Anastasia, martyr and married virgin, is said to have died at Sirmium. By the 5th century she was venerated in Rome as a Roman martyr, perhaps because her cult became conflated with the titulus Anastasiae, an ancient church by the Circus Maximus. Her feast day is 25 December.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Anastasia." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Anastasia." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anastasia

"Anastasia." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anastasia

Anastasia

Anastasia (Anastasia Nikolayevna) (ănəstā´shə nyĬkəlī´əfnă), 1901–18, youngest daughter of Czar Nicholas II, last of the Russian czars. She was killed with the rest of her immediate family after the Russian Revolution, but several women later claimed to be her.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Anastasia." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Anastasia." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anastasia

"Anastasia." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anastasia

Anastasia

Anastasia •astrantia • Bastia •Dei gratia, hamartia •poinsettia •in absentia, Parmentier •Izvestia •meteor, wheatear •Whittier • cottier • Ostia •consortia, courtier •protea • Yakutia • frontier • Althea •Anthea • Parthia •Pythia, stichomythia •Carinthia, Cynthia •forsythia • Scythia • clothier • salvia •Latvia • Yugoslavia • envier •Flavia, Moldavia, Moravia, Octavia, paviour (US pavior), Scandinavia, Xavier •Bolivia, Livia, Olivia, trivia •Sylvia • Guinevere • Elzevir •Monrovia, Segovia •Retrovir • effluvia • colloquia •Goodyear • yesteryear • brassiere •Abkhazia •Anastasia, aphasia, brazier, dysphasia, dysplasia, euthanasia, fantasia, Frazier, glazier, grazier, gymnasia, Malaysiaamnesia, anaesthesia (US anesthesia), analgesia, freesia, Indonesia, Silesia, synaesthesia •artemisia, Kirghizia, Tunisiaambrosia, crozier, hosier, osier, symposia

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Anastasia." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Anastasia." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anastasia-0

"Anastasia." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anastasia-0