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sweat

sweat / swet/ • n. 1. moisture exuded through the pores of the skin, typically in profuse quantities as a reaction to heat, physical exertion, fever, or fear. ∎  an instance of exuding moisture in this way over a period of time: even thinking about him made me break out in a sweat. we'd all worked up a sweat in spite of the cold. ∎ inf. a state of flustered anxiety or distress: I don't believe he'd get into such a sweat about a girl. ∎ inf. hard work; effort: computer graphics take a lot of the sweat out of animation. 2. (sweats) informal term for sweatsuit or sweatpants. ∎  [as adj.] denoting loose casual garments made of thick, fleecy cotton: sweat tops and bottoms. • v. (past sweat·ed or sweat ) 1. [intr.] exude sweat: he was sweating profusely. ∎  [tr.] (sweat something out/off) get rid of (something) from the body by exuding sweat: a well-hydrated body sweats out waste products more efficiently. ∎  [tr.] cause (a person or animal) to exude sweat by exercise or exertion: cold as it was, the climb had sweated him. ∎  (of food or an object) ooze or exude beads of moisture onto its surface: cheese stored at room temperature will quickly begin to sweat. ∎  (of a person) exert a great deal of strenuous effort: I've sweated over this for six months. ∎  (of a person) be or remain in a state of extreme anxiety, typically for a prolonged period: I let her sweat for a while, then I asked her out again. ∎  [tr.] inf. worry about (something): he's not going to have a lot of time to sweat the details. 2. [tr.] heat (chopped vegetables) slowly in a pan with a small amount of fat, so that they cook in their own juices: sweat the celery and onions with olive oil and seasoning. ∎  [intr.] (of chopped vegetables) be cooked in this way: let the chopped onion sweat gently for five minutes. 3. [tr.] subject (metal) to surface melting, esp. to fasten or join by solder without a soldering iron: the tire is sweated on to the wooden parts. PHRASES: break a sweat inf. exert oneself physically. by the sweat of one's brow by one's own hard work, typically manual labor. don't sweat it used to urge someone not to worry. no sweat inf. used to convey that one perceives no difficulty or problem with something: “We haven't any decaf, I'm afraid.” “No sweat.” sweat blood inf. make an extraordinarily strenuous effort to do something: she's sweated blood to support her family. ∎  be extremely anxious: we've been sweating blood over the question of what is right. sweat buckets inf. sweat profusely. sweat bullets inf. be extremely anxious or nervous. sweat it out inf. endure an unpleasant experience, typically one involving physical exertion in great heat: about 1,500 runners are expected to sweat it out in this year's run. ∎  wait in a state of extreme anxiety for something to happen or be resolved: he sweated it out until the lab report was back. sweat the small stuff worry about trivial things. ORIGIN: Old English swāt (noun), swǣtan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zweet and German Schweiss, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin sudor.

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"sweat." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat-1

"sweat." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat-1

sweat

sweat or perspiration, fluid secreted by the sweat glands of mammalian skin and containing water, salts, and waste products of body metabolism such as urea. The dissolved solid content of sweat is only one eighth that of an equal volume of urine, the body's main vehicle of salt excretion; however, excessive sweating may produce severe salt loss (see heat exhaustion). Human sweat glands are of two types, eccrine and apocrine. The eccrine glands, found everywhere on the body surface, are vital to the regulation of body temperature. Evaporation of the sweat secreted by the eccrines cools the body, dissipating the heat generated by metabolic processes. The release of such sweat is usually imperceptible; yet even in cool weather an individual will lose from 1 pt to 3 qt of fluid per day. Only when environmental conditions are especially hot or humid, or during periods of exercise or emotional stress, does the output of sweat exceed the rate of evaporation, so that noticeable beads of moisture appear on the skin. When such conditions are extreme, the body may lose up to 20 qt of fluid per day. Production of sweat is controlled by the temperature-regulating center of the hypothalamus. The apocrine glands, which occur only in the armpits and about the ears, nipples, navel, and anogenital region, are scent glands. They function in response to stress or sexual stimulation, playing no part in temperature regulation. The apocrines exude a sticky fluid quite different from the watery sweat of the eccrines. Apocrine fluid is rich in organic substances that are odorless when fresh but are quickly degraded by bacteria on the skin to produce characteristic odors. Copious sweating in the armpits comes not from the apocrines but from the eccrines interspersed among them.

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"sweat." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sweat

"sweat." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sweat

sweat

sweat emit sweat, intr. and trans.; work hard. OE. swætan = MLG., MDu. swēten (Du. zweeten), OHG. sweizzan roast (G. schweissen fuse, weld) :- Gmc. *swaitjan, f. *swaitaz sb., whence OE. swāt, OS. swēt (Du. zweet), OHG. sweiz (G. schweiss); IE. base *swoid-, *swid-, whence also L. sūdor, Skr. svéda-, Gr. hidrós, W. chwŷs. sweat sb. †life-blood (so OE. swāt); hard work XIII; moisture excreted through the pores XIV; colloq. (orig. Sc. and U.S.) state of impatience or anxiety XVIII. Superseded ME. swote (OE. swāt). sweater (-ER1) one who sweats XVI; vest of wool to protect from cold XIX.

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"sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat-2

"sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat-2

sweat

sweat (swet) n. the watery fluid secreted by the sweat glands. Its principal constituents in solution are sodium chloride and urea. The secretion of sweat is a means of excreting nitrogenous waste; it also has a cooling effect as the sweat evaporates from the surface of the skin. Anatomical name: sudor. s. gland a simple coiled tubular exocrine gland that lies in the dermis of the skin. Sweat glands occur over most of the surface of the body; they are particularly abundant in the armpits, on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands, and on the forehead.

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"sweat." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

"sweat." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

sweat

sweat by the sweat of one's brow by one's own hard work, typically manual labour; often with allusion to God's sentence on Adam after the Fall, ‘In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread’ (Genesis 3:19).

See also blood, toil, tears and sweat.

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"sweat." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

"sweat." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

sweat

sweat The salty fluid secreted by the sweat glands onto the surface of the skin. Excess body heat is used to evaporate sweat, thereby resulting in cooling of the skin surface. Small amounts of urea are excreted in sweat.

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"sweat." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sweat." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

"sweat." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

Sweat

Sweat: see SVEDAJA.

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"Sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

"Sweat." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat

sweat

sweatabet, aiguillette, anisette, Annette, Antoinette, arête, Arlette, ate, baguette, banquette, barbette, barrette, basinet, bassinet, beget, Bernadette, beset, bet, Bette, blanquette, Brett, briquette, brochette, brunette (US brunet), Burnett, cadet, caravanette, cassette, castanet, cigarette (US cigaret), clarinet, Claudette, Colette, coquette, corvette, couchette, courgette, croquette, curette, curvet, Debrett, debt, dinette, diskette, duet, epaulette (US epaulet), flageolet, flannelette, forget, fret, galette, gazette, Georgette, get, godet, grisette, heavyset, Jeanette, jet, kitchenette, La Fayette, landaulet, launderette, layette, lazaret, leatherette, let, Lett, lorgnette, luncheonette, lunette, Lynette, maisonette, majorette, maquette, Marie-Antoinette, marionette, Marquette, marquisette, martinet, met, minaret, minuet, moquette, motet, musette, Nanette, net, noisette, nonet, novelette, nymphet, octet, Odette, on-set, oubliette, Paulette, pet, Phuket, picquet, pillaret, pincette, pipette, piquet, pirouette, planchette, pochette, quartet, quickset, quintet, regret, ret, Rhett, roomette, rosette, roulette, satinette, septet, serviette, sestet, set, sett, sextet, silhouette, soubrette, spinet, spinneret, statuette, stet, stockinet, sublet, suffragette, Suzette, sweat, thickset, threat, Tibet, toilette, tret, underlet, upset, usherette, vedette, vet, vignette, vinaigrette, wagonette, wet, whet, winceyette, yet, Yvette •quodlibet • alphabet •ramjet, scramjet •propjet • turbojet • etiquette • outlet •triolet • calumet • cermet

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"sweat." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"sweat." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sweat-0