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rib

rib / rib/ • n. 1. each of a series of slender curved bones articulated in pairs to the spine (twelve pairs in humans), protecting the thoracic cavity and its organs. ∎  a rib of an animal with meat adhering to it used as food; a joint or cut from the ribs of an animal. 2. a long raised piece of stronger or thicker material across a surface or through a structure, and typically serving to support or strengthen it, in particular: ∎  Archit. a curved member supporting a vault or defining its form. ∎  any of the curved transverse pieces of metal or timber in a ship, extending up from the keel and forming part of the framework of the hull. ∎  each of the curved pieces of wood forming the body of a lute or the sides of a violin. ∎  each of the hinged rods supporting the fabric of an umbrella. ∎  Aeron. a structural member in an airfoil, extending back from the leading edge and serving to define the contour of the airfoil. ∎  a vein of a leaf (esp. the midrib) or an insect's wing. ∎  a ridge of rock or land. ∎  Knitting a combination of alternate knit (plain) and purl stitches producing a ridged, slightly elastic fabric, used esp. for the cuffs and bottom edges of sweaters. • v. (ribbed , rib·bing ) [tr.] 1. (usu. be ribbed) mark with or form into raised bands or ridges: the road ahead was ribbed with furrows of slush. 2. inf. tease good-naturedly: the first time I appeared in the outfit I was ribbed mercilessly. DERIVATIVES: rib·less adj.

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"rib." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-3

"rib." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-3

rib

rib, one of the slender, elongated, curved bones that compose the chest cage in higher vertebrates. Ribs occur in pairs, and are found in most vertebrates; however, in some lower vertebrates, including fishes, they run along the entire length of the backbone. The ribs of the snake are used in locomotion. In the human there are 12 pairs of ribs. Each rib is connected to the vertebral column by strong ligaments. In the front, a flexible section of cartilage connects the rib to the sternum, or breastbone. Below the 7th rib, the 8th, 9th, and 10th ribs are not attached directly to the sternum, but to the cartilage of the 7th rib. The 11th and 12th pairs of ribs are not attached in front at all, and hence are known as floating ribs. Technically, these ribs do not "float," however, but are attached to the vertebral column in the rear and extend only part of the way around the chest. In birds and mammals, ribs enclose the lungs and heart and assist in the process of breathing. During inhalation the ribs move upward and farther apart, expanding the chest cavity. During exhalation their downward motion aids in expelling air from the lungs. See skeleton.

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"rib." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rib

"rib." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rib

rib

rib. Moulding on a flat or vaulted ceiling. In medieval work a raised moulding forming part of the vault, framing the panels or webs, often with elaborate sections, and with their crowning intersections adorned with sculptured bosses. Types of Gothic rib include:diagonal rib: main ribs running diagonally across a compartment square or rectangular on plan;lierne rib: subordinate rib between the main ribs, or between the apex (or clef) of the vault and the junction of two tierceron ribs;ridge rib: rib at the apex of a medieval vault, i.e. horizontal and coincident with the main axis of nave or aisle;tierceron rib: secondary rib springing e.g. from the pier to the ridge rib;transverse rib: rib rising from a pier and set at right angles to the main axis of the nave or aisle, i.e. spanning either of the latter;wall-rib: formeret or rib engaged to the wall of a vault compartment.

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"rib." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

"rib." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

rib

rib (rib) n. a curved strip of bone forming part of the skeleton of the thorax. There are 12 pairs of ribs. The head of each rib articulates with one of the 12 thoracic vertebrae of the backbone; the other end is attached to a costal cartilage. false r. any of the three pairs of ribs below the true ribs. Each is connected by its cartilage to the rib above it. floating r. any of the last two pairs of ribs, which end freely in the muscles of the body wall. true r. any of the first seven pairs of ribs, which are connected directly to the sternum by their costal cartilages. Anatomical name: costa.

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"rib." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

"rib." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

rib

rib One of a series of slender curved bones that form a cage to enclose, support, and protect the heart and lungs (see thorax). Ribs occur in pairs, articulating with the thoracic vertebrae of the spinal column at the back and (in reptiles, birds, and mammals) with the sternum (breastbone) in front. Movements of the rib cage, controlled by intercostal muscles between the ribs, are important in breathing (see respiratory movement).

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"rib." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-0

"rib." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-0

rib

rib any of the curved bones articulated to the spine OE.; wife, woman (in allusion to Gen. 2: 21) XVI; various transf. and techn. uses from XIV. OE. rib(b), corr. (with variations in gender and decl.) to OS. ribbi (Du. rib(be)), OHG. rippi, rippa (G. rippe), ON. rif :- Gmc. *rebja-, -jō, rel. to OSl. (Russ.) rebró rib, side, and prob. further to Gr. orophḗ roof, eréphein roof over.

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"rib." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-4

"rib." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-4

rib

rib Part of the axial skeleton of vertebrates, related to the vertebral apophyses. Ribs develop at the myosepta skeletagenous septa junction, articulating with vertebral apophyses. There are two types of rib: dorsal ribs form at the myoseptum horizontal septum junction, ventral ribs form where the myoseptum intersects the connective tissue surrounding the coelom.

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"rib." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

"rib." A Dictionary of Zoology. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

rib

rib Long, curved bones arranged in pairs, extending sideways from the backbone of vertebrates. In fish and some reptiles, they extend the length of the spine; in mammals, they form the framework of the chest, and protect the lungs and heart. There are 12 pairs of ribs in humans.

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"rib." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rib." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rib

"rib." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rib

RIB

RIB • n. a small open boat with a fiberglass hull and inflatable rubber sides. ORIGIN: acronym from rigid inflatable boat.

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"RIB." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"RIB." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-2

rib

ribbib, crib, dib, fib, glib, jib, lib, nib, rib, sib, snib, squib •memsahib • Carib • sparerib •Sennacherib

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"rib." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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RIB

RIB Racing Information Bureau
• rigidhull inflatable boat
• Rural Industries Bureau

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"RIB." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"RIB." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib

Rib

Rib Biochem. ribose

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"Rib." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Rib." The Oxford Dictionary of Abbreviations. . Retrieved October 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/rib-0