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joint

joint / joint/ • n. 1. a point at which parts of an artificial structure are joined. ∎  Geol. a break or fracture in a mass of rock, with no relative displacement of the parts. ∎  a piece of flexible material forming the hinge of a book cover. 2. a structure in the human or animal body at which two parts of the skeleton are fitted together. ∎  each of the distinct sections of a body or limb between the places at which they are connected: the top two joints of his index finger. ∎  Brit. a large piece of meat cooked whole or ready for cooking: a joint of ham. ∎  the part of a stem of a plant from which a leaf or branch grows. ∎  a section of a plant stem between such parts; an internode. 3. inf. an establishment of a specified kind, esp. one where people meet for eating, drinking, or entertainment: a burger joint. ∎  (the joint) prison. 4. inf. a marijuana cigarette. • adj. shared, held, or made by two or more people or organizations together: the companies issued a joint statement. ∎  shared, held, or made by both houses of a bicameral legislature: a joint session of Congress a joint congressional hearing. ∎  sharing in a position, achievement, or activity: a joint winner. ∎  Law applied or regarded together. Often contrasted with several. • v. [tr.] 1. provide or fasten (something) with joints: [as adj.] (jointed) jointed lever arms. ∎  fill up the joints of (masonry or brickwork) with mortar; point. ∎  prepare (a board) for being joined to another by planing its edge. 2. cut (the body of an animal) into joints. PHRASES: out of joint (of a joint of the body) out of position; dislocated: he put his hip out of joint. ∎  in a state of disorder or disorientation: time was thrown completely out of joint.DERIVATIVES: joint·less adj.joint·ly adv.

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"joint." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"joint." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/joint-0

"joint." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/joint-0

joint (in anatomy)

joint, in anatomy, juncture between two bones. Some joints are immovable, e.g., those that connect the bones of the skull, which are separated merely by short, tough fibers of cartilage. Movable joints are found for the most part in the limbs. Hinge joints provide a forward and backward motion, as at the elbow and knee. Pivot joints permit rotary movement, like the turning of the head from side to side. Ball-and-socket joints, like those at the hip and shoulder, allow the greatest range of movement, as the rounded end of one bone fits into the hollow or socket of another bone, separated by elastic cartilage. Joints can further be classified as fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial. Collagen fibers connect fibrous joints. Synovial joints ease movement through the use of a lubricating liquid, supplied by the synovial membrane that lines movable joints. In synovial joints, a cushioning sac known as a bursa contains the fluid, which lubricates and nourishes the joint. Those joints which lack synovial fluid are nourished by blood. Holding the joints in place are strong ligaments fastened to the bones above and below the joint. Joints are subject to sprains and dislocations, as well as to infections and disorders caused by such diseases as arthritis. In recent years, the use of artificial joints has become increasingly common, particularly in hip and knee replacement. Many orthopedic surgeons now perform operations of this sort, using metal or plastic replacement joints in order to relieve pain, or to prevent or correct joint deformity.

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"joint (in anatomy)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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joint

joint The point of contact between two (or more) bones, together with the tissues that surround it. Joints fall into three classes that differ in the degree of freedom of movement they allow: (1) immovable joints, e.g. the sutures between the bones that form the cranium; (2) slightly movable joints, e.g. the symphyses between the vertebrae of the spinal column; and (3) freely movable or synovial joints, e.g. those that occur between the limb bones. Synovial joints include the ball-and-socket joints (between the limbs and the hip and shoulder girdles), which allow movement in all directions; and the hinge joints (e.g. at the knee and elbow), which allow movement in one plane only (see illustration). A synovial joint is bound by ligaments and lined with synovial membrane.

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"joint." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"joint." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved June 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/joint-0

joint

joint In anatomy, place where one bone meets another. In movable joints, such as those of the knee, elbow and spine, the bones are separated and cushioned from one another by pads of cartilage. In fixed joints, cartilage may be present in infancy but disappear later as the bones fuse together, as in the skull. In the movable joints of bony vertebrates, the bones are held together by ligaments. Synovial fluid lubricates the joint.

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"joint." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"joint." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/joint

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Joint

JOINT

United; coupled together in interest; shared between two or more persons; not solitary in interest or action but acting together or in unison. A combined, undivided effort or undertaking involving two or more individuals. Produced by or involving the concurring action of two or more; united in or possessing a common relation, action, or interest. To share common rights, duties, and liabilities.

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"Joint." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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joint

joint (joint) n. the point at which two or more bones are connected. The opposing surfaces of bone are lined with cartilaginous, fibrous, or soft (synovial) tissue. See also amphiarthrosis, diarthrosis, synarthrosis.

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"joint." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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jointing

jointing. Completion of joints in brickwork or masonry while the mortar is still soft, in contrast to pointing. See also brick.

Bibliography

Brunskill (1990)

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"jointing." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Joint

Joint

of osteopathsMensa.

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"Joint." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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joint

jointaccount, amount, count, fount, miscount, mount, no-account, surmount •headcount • viscount • paramount •tantamount •don't, won't, wont •anoint, appoint, conjoint, joint, outpoint, point, point-to-point •standpoint •cashpoint, flashpoint •checkpoint • endpoint • breakpoint •needlepoint • midpoint • pinpoint •vantage point • knifepoint •strongpoint • viewpoint • gunpoint •counterpoint • punt •affront, blunt, brunt, bunt, confront, cunt, front, Granth, grunt, hunt, mahant, runt, shunt, stunt, up-front •exeunt • manhunt • headhunt •witch-hunt • seafront • beachfront •shopfront •forefront, storefront •waterfront

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"joint." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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