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void

void A hole in a rock. If they are interconnected, voids form paths along which water and other fluids may flow. In increasing order of size, the major types of voids are: intercrystalline boundaries; intergranular pores or spaces between the grains of a sediment; microfractures or local cracks, usually extending for only a few tens of centimetres and from a few micrometres to 0.1 mm wide; fractures including joints, small faults, and bedding planes, which are often extensive and may have openings up to a few millimetres wide; fissures formed by solution, weathering, or local gravitational or tectonic displacement, and up to about 10 cm wide; and solution channels, which range up to several metres wide and many hundreds of metres long.

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"void." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"void." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/void

"void." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/void

Void

Void (in Buddhism): see ŚŪNYATĀ.

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"Void." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Void." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/void

"Void." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/void