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chorus

cho·rus / ˈkôrəs/ • n. (pl. -rus·es ) 1. a large organized group of singers, esp. one that performs together with an orchestra or opera company. ∎  a group of singers or dancers performing together in a supporting role in a stage musical or opera. ∎  a piece of choral music, esp. one forming part of a larger work such as an opera or oratorio. ∎  a part of a song that is repeated after each verse, typically by more than one singer. ∎  a simple song for group singing, esp. in informal Christian worship. 2. (in ancient Greek tragedy) a group of performers who comment on the main action, typically speaking and moving together. ∎  a simultaneous utterance of something by many people: a growing chorus of complaint. ∎  a single character who speaks the prologue and other linking parts of the play, esp. in Elizabethan drama. ∎  a section of text spoken by the chorus in drama. ∎  a device used with an amplified musical instrument to give the impression that more than one instrument is being played: [as adj.] a chorus pedal. • v. (-rused , -rus·ing ) [tr.] (of a group of people) say the same thing at the same time: they chorused a noisy amen.

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"chorus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chorus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus-1

"chorus." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus-1

chorus (in Greek drama)

chorus, in the drama of ancient Greece. Originally the chorus seems to have arisen from the singing of the dithyramb, and the dithyrambic chorus allegedly became a true dramatic chorus when Thespis in the 6th cent. BC introduced the actor. First the chorus as a participating actor tied the histrionic interludes together; later, as a narrator, it commented on the action and divided it, creating acts. And as tragedy developed the chorus shrank in size and actors increased in number. Aeschylus began with a chorus of 50, but the number was soon decreased to 12. Sophocles used a chorus of 15. In the 3d cent. BC the comic chorus contained only seven persons and in the 2d cent. BC only four, the tragic chorus having disappeared altogether. The chorus had ceased to play a vital part in the drama; Euripides assigned to it lyrics not necessarily integrated with the action. Ultimately it was dispensed with in comedy as well.

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"chorus (in Greek drama)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"chorus (in Greek drama)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/chorus-greek-drama

chorus

chorus in ancient Greek tragedy, a group of performers who comment on the main action, typically speaking and moving together; a single character who speaks the prologue and other linking parts of the play, especially in Elizabethan drama.

The word is recorded from the mid 16th century (denoting a character speaking the prologue and epilogue in a play and serving to comment on events), and comes via Latin from Greek khoros.

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"chorus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chorus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus

"chorus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus

Chorus

Chorus

a company of singers; a simultaneous outburst of speech. See also carol, choir.

Examples: chorus of bad language; of complaints; of conversation, 1845; of Greek actors; of laughter; of planets, 1660; of porpoises, 1698; of singers, 1656.

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"Chorus." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Chorus." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus

chorus

chorus in Greek drama and dramatic pieces modelled thereon XVI; band of singers XVII; musical composition to be sung by this; refrain or burden XVIII. — L. — Gr. khorós dance, band of dancers, choir.

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"chorus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"chorus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus-2

chorus

chorus In Greek tragedy, the choros danced and chanted commentary. Today, a chorus refers to a group of voices. Major works with chorus parts include cantatas, operas and oratorios. See also choir

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"chorus." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"chorus." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/chorus

"chorus." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/chorus

chorus

chorusArras, embarrass, harass •gynandrous, polyandrous •Pancras • charas • Tatras • disastrous •ferrous • leprous • ambidextrous •Carreras, mayoress •scabrous •cirrus, Pyrrhus •chivalrous •citrous, citrus •ludicrous • tenebrous •Cyrus, Epirus, papyrus, virus •fibrous • hydrous • Cyprus •retrovirus • monstrous •brachiosaurus, brontosaurus, canorous, chorus, Epidaurus, Horus, megalosaurus, pelorus, porous, sorus, stegosaurus, Taurus, thesaurus, torus, tyrannosaurus •walrus •ochrous (US ocherous) •cumbrous • wondrous • lustrous •Algeciras, Severus •desirous •Arcturus, Epicurus, Honduras •barbarous • tuberous • slumberous •Cerberus • rapturous •lecherous, treacherous •torturous • vulturous • Pandarus •slanderous • ponderous •malodorous, odorous •thunderous • murderous •carboniferous, coniferous, cruciferous, melliferous, odoriferous, pestiferous, somniferous, splendiferous, umbelliferous, vociferous •phosphorous, phosphorus •sulphurous (US sulfurous) •Anaxagoras, Pythagorasclangorous, languorous •rigorous, vigorous •dangerous • verdurous •cankerous, cantankerous, rancorous •decorous • Icarus • valorous •dolorous • idolatrous •amorous, clamorous, glamorous •timorous •humerus, humorous, numerous •murmurous • generous • sonorous •onerous • obstreperous • Hesperus •vaporous • viviparous • viperous •Bosporus, prosperous •stuporous • cancerous •Monoceros, rhinoceros •sorcerous • adventurous • Tartarus •nectarous • dexterous • traitorous •preposterous • slaughterous •boisterous, roisterous •uterus • adulterous • stertorous •cadaverous • feverous •carnivorous, herbivorous, insectivorous, omnivorous •Lazarus

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"chorus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"chorus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved July 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/chorus-0