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cantata

cantata (kəntä´tə) [Ital.,=sung], composite musical form similar to a short unacted opera or brief oratorio, developed in Italy in the baroque period. The term was first used in 1620 to refer to strophic variations in the voice part over a recurrent melody in the bass accompaniment. Gradually the cantata came to contain contrasting sections of recitative and aria separated by instrumental passages, often in the current operatic style. In the second half of the 17th cent. the secular cantata was standardized by Stradella, Alessandro Scarlatti, and other members of the Neapolitan school into two arias with recitatives. This form was very popular through the 18th cent. as a vehicle for virtuoso singing. In France the cantata was adapted by Rameau to contain three arias with recitatives. In Germany the sacred cantata was more popular than the secular. It incorporated extensive choral and instrumental sections. A particular variety, the chorale cantata, utilized the verses of hymns and frequently the hymn tunes in various parts of the cantata. This type, as written by J. S. Bach, opens with a chorus, which is followed by recitatives and arias for each soloist, and then closes with a harmonized chorale. After Bach the cantata became, in general, a diminutive form of the oratorio.

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cantata

cantata Musical work consisting of vocal solos and choruses, often alternating with passages of recitative, and accompanied by an orchestra. It was a popular form in the 17th and 18th centuries, when Alessandro Scarlatti and J. S. Bach wrote numerous cantatas, both secular and religious.

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Cantata

Cantata. Setting by Stravinsky for sop., ten., female ch., 2 fl., 2 ob., cor anglais, and vc. of anon. 15th- and 16th-cent. Eng. poems (incl. ‘Lyke Wake Dirge’ and ‘Westron Wind’). Comp. 1951–2. F.p. Los Angeles 1952; London 1953.

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"Cantata." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Cantata." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantata

cantata

cantata (It.). Sung. Term with different meanings according to period: (1) In early 17th cent., often a dramatic madrigal sung by one v., with lute acc. or basso continuo. The form became very popular in It. later in 17th cent., being perf. by several vv., some cantatas being comp. of recit., others of a succession of arias. The cantata da camera was secular, the cantata da chiesa (developed by Carissimi) sacred. A prolific exponent of the cantata was A. Scarlatti, who wrote 600 for solo v. and continuo, 60 for v. and instrs., and several chamber cantatas for 2 vv. During 18th cent., became more theatrical, comprising a ritornello, aria on two contrasted themes, and concluding ritornello, and acc. by str. In Ger. the form was found mainly in the church, written for soloist(s), ch., organ, and orch. on biblical text. Telemann, Schütz, and Handel wrote in this style but were overshadowed by Bach who wrote nearly 300 church cantatas as well as secular cantatas which resemble a short opera (Coffee Cantata and Peasant Cantata). From Bach's model there developed the cantata of the 19th cent. which was usually on a sacred subject and was, in effect, a short oratorio. Secular cantatas on an elaborate scale are Elgar's King Olaf and Caractacus. In the 20th cent. the term has acquired a much looser meaning. Walton's Belshazzar's Feast and Vaughan Williams's Sancta Civitas are described by their composers as oratorios, but could equally well be classified as cantatas. Britten's Cantata academica is for soloists, ch., and orch., while Stravinsky's Cantata is for 2 soloists, women's ch., and 6 instr.

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cantata

can·ta·ta / kənˈtätə/ • n. a medium-length narrative or descriptive piece of music with vocal solos and usually a chorus and orchestra.

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"cantata." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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cantata

cantata XVIII. — It. (sc. aria AIR), fem. pp. of cantare sing; see CHANT, -ADE.

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"cantata." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"cantata." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantata-1

cantata

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"cantata." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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