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defame

de·fame / diˈfām/ • v. [tr.] damage the good reputation of (someone); slander or libel: the article defamed his family. DERIVATIVES: def·a·ma·tion / ˌdefəˈmāshən/ n. de·fam·a·to·ry / -ˈfaməˌtôrē/ adj. de·fam·er n.

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"defame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"defame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defame

"defame." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defame

defame

defame †render infamous; attack the good name of. XIV. ME. diffame, defame — OF. diffamer (also desf-, def(f)-) — L. diffāmāre spread about as an evil report, f. dis-, DIF-, DE- 6 + fāma FAME.
So defamation XIV. defamatory XVI. — medL.

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"defame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"defame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defame-0

"defame." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved November 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/defame-0