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Art Deco

Art Deco. Fashionable style of European and American design and interior decoration (also known as the Style Moderne) that superseded Art Nouveau in the period immediately before and after the 1914–18 war. In the 1920s and 1930s it evolved further, and took its name from the Exposition International des Arts-Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris in 1924–5: the official publication of the Exposition, Encyclopédie des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes au XXième siècle, in 12 volumes with many illustrations, disseminated the elements of a style derived from the more severe geometrical patterns evolved as a reaction to Art Nouveau. Archaeological aspects also influenced the style: the discovery of Pharaoh Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 led to a new enthusiasm for Ancient Egyptian motifs and themes such as strong colouring, pyramidal compositions, and stepped forms. However, the canted arch, chevron, stepped corbelled arch, and stepped gable (themselves pyramidal compositions) owed more to what C18 designers imagined was Egyptian, derived from publications such as Piranesi's Diverse maniere d'adornare i cammini (Different Ways of Decorating Fireplaces–1769) and from exotic Egyptian Revival stage-sets. Investigations of Aztec and other Meso-American architecture with its stepped forms were also influential. Late Art Deco designs were often concerned with aerodynamics, speed, and streamlining to emphasize the style's Modernist pretensions. Robert Mallet-Stevens was the most important of the French architects working with Art Deco elements, but the style also flourished in the USA, where William van Alen's Chrysler Building, NYC (1928–30), is its most celebrated architectural example. Simplified and vulgarized elements of Art Deco entered Post-Modern designs from the 1960s.

Bibliography

Bayer (1992);
C. Benton et al. (eds.) (2003);
Bletter & and Robinson (1975);
Brunhammer (1984);
J. Curl (2005);
Hillier (1985);
Hillier & and Escritt (1997);

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"Art Deco." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Art Deco." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco

"Art Deco." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco

art deco

art deco (ärt dĕkō´; är dākō´, ärt) or art moderne (är môdĕrn´, ärt), term that designates a style of design that originated in French luxury goods shortly before World War I and became ubiquitously and internationally popular during the 1920s and 30s. Coined in the 1960s, the name derives from the 1925 Paris Exposition of Decorative Arts, where the style reached its apex. Art deco is characterized by long, thin forms, curving surfaces, and geometric patterning. The practitioners of the style attempted to describe the sleekness they thought expressive of the machine age. The style influenced all aspects of the era's art and architecture, as well as the decorative, graphic, and industrial arts. Works executed in the art deco style range from skyscrapers and ocean liners to toasters, furniture by designers such as France's Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann (1879–1933), and accessories such as the elegant glass works of René Lalique. Since the 1960s and 70s the style has undergone a resurgence of popularity. Napier, New Zealand, which was rebuilt after a 1931 earthquake, has the largest unmixed concentration of art deco architecture in the world. Noted U.S. monuments to the style include New York's Rockefeller Center and Chrysler Building, the South Beach section of Miami Beach, Fla., and Fair Park, in Dallas, Tex.

See B. Hillier, Art Deco (1968), Y. Brunhammer, Art Deco Style (1984); V. Arwas, Art Deco (1985); A. Duncan, ed., Encyclopedia of Art Deco (1988); P. Bayer, Art Deco Architecture (1999); T. and C. Benton and G. Wood, ed., Art Deco: 1910–1939 (2003); C. Breeze, American Art Deco (2003); B. Hillier and S. Escritt, Art Deco Style (2003); G. Wood, Essential Art Deco (2003).

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"art deco." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"art deco." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/art-deco

art deco

art deco Fashionable style of design and interior decoration in the 1920s and 1930s. It took its name from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris in 1925. The art deco style is characterized by sleek forms, simplified lines, and geometric patterns. It began as a luxury style, an example of modern design fashioned from expensive, hand-crafted materials. After the Depression, art deco shifted towards mass production and low-cost materials.

http://www.discoverfrance.net/France/Art/deco.shtml

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"art deco." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"art deco." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/art-deco

art deco

art dec·o • n. the predominant decorative art style of the 1920s and 1930s, characterized by precise and boldly delineated geometric shapes and strong colors, and used most notably in household objects and in architecture.

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"art deco." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"art deco." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco-1

"art deco." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco-1

art deco

art deco the predominant decorative art style of the 1920s and 1930s, characterized by precise and boldly delineated geometric shapes and strong colours.

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"art deco." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"art deco." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco

art deco

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"art deco." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"art deco." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/art-deco-0