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screen / skrēn/ • n. 1. a fixed or movable upright partition used to divide a room, to give shelter from drafts, heat, or light, or to provide concealment or privacy. ∎  a thing providing concealment or protection: his jeep was discreetly parked behind a screen of trees | fig. the article is using science as a screen for unexamined prejudice. ∎  Mil. a detachment of troops or ships detailed to cover the movements of the main body. ∎  Archit. a partition of carved wood or stone separating the nave of a church from the chancel, choir, or sanctuary.See also rood screen. ∎  a frame with fine wire netting used in a window or doorway to keep out mosquitoes and other flying insects: [as adj.] screen door. ∎  a part of an electrical or other instrument that protects it or prevents it from causing electromagnetic interference. ∎  Electr. (also screen grid) a grid placed between the control grid and the anode of a valve to reduce the capacitance between these electrodes. 2. the surface of a cathode-ray tube or similar electronic device, esp. that of a television, VDT, or monitor, on which images and data are displayed. ∎  a blank, typically white or silver surface on which a photographic image is projected: the world's largest movie screen. ∎  (the screen) movies or television; the motion-picture industry: she's a star of the stage as well as the screen. ∎  the data or images displayed on a computer screen: pressing the F1 key at any time will display a help screen. ∎  Photog. a flat piece of ground glass on which the image formed by a camera lens is focused. 3. Printing a transparent, finely ruled plate or film used in halftone reproduction. 4. a large sieve or riddle, esp. one for sorting substances such as grain or coal into different sizes. • v. [tr.] 1. conceal, protect, or shelter (someone or something) with a screen or something forming a screen: her hair swung across to screen her face a high hedge screened all of the front from passersby. ∎  (screen something off) separate something from something else with or as if with a screen: an area had been screened off as a waiting room. ∎  protect (someone) from something dangerous or unpleasant: in my country, a man of my rank would be screened completely from any risk of attack. ∎  prevent from causing or protect from electromagnetic interference: ensure that your microphone leads are properly screened from hum pickup. 2. show (a movie or video) or broadcast (a television program): the show is to be screened by HBO later this year. 3. test (a person or substance) for the presence or absence of a disease or contaminant: outpatients were screened for cervical cancer. ∎  check on or investigate (someone), typically to ascertain whether they are suitable for or can be trusted in a particular situation or job: all prospective presidential candidates would have to screened by the committee. ∎  evaluate or analyze (something) for its suitability for a particular purpose or application: only one percent of rain forest plants have been screened for medical use. ∎  (screen someone/something out) exclude someone or something after such evaluation or investigation: only those refugees who are screened out are sent back to Vietnam. 4. pass (a substance such as grain or coal) through a large sieve or screen, esp. so as to sort it into different sizes. 5. Printing project (a photograph or other image) through a transparent ruled plate so as to be able to reproduce it as a halftone. DERIVATIVES: screen·a·ble adj. screen·er n. screen·ful / -ˌfoŏl/ n. ORIGIN: Middle English: shortening of Old Northern French escren, of Germanic origin.

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"screen." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-2

"screen." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-2

screen

screen, in architecture, partition or enclosure not extending to the ceiling; usually a structure in stone, wood, or metal. It frequently serves to mark the boundaries of portions of churches and cathedrals. The choir screen or chancel screen, the most usual form, separates the choir or chancel from the body of the church. In many medieval cathedrals the choir screen was a richly decorated structure of pierced stonework, often with sculpture. The screens of the cathedrals of Chartres and Albi in France and of York, Lincoln, and Durham in England are especially noteworthy. Many English parish churches contain fine screens of carved and painted wood. In the basilican churches of Italy, such as St. Mark's, Venice, the chancel front was often marked by an elaborate inlaid marble parapet wall. With the coming of the Renaissance the constructing of chancel screens became rare except in Spain, where rejas of ironwork or bronze were extensively employed (see grille and rejería). In Greek Christian churches, the choir screen takes the form of a solid partition, the iconostasis, decorated with holy images (whence its name) and usually provided with three doors. It entirely separates the sanctuary from the body of the church and conceals from the congregation the altar and the celebration of Mass. The rood screen is a more elaborate form of choir screen that bears the rood or crucifix. A jube is a choir screen equipped with balconies for reading or preaching. A reredos is a wall or screen behind the high altar. As an article of furniture, the folding screen is of great antiquity, dating in China from the 2d cent. BC Widely used to adorn palaces and mansions, the screens of China and Japan were often gorgeous conceptions with carved wood frames, their panels of rich textiles or inlaid with jade and precious metals. The use of the folding screen, often showing East Asian influences in its construction, materials, and design, has continued to the present day.

See F. Bond, Screens and Galleries in English Churches (1908); A. Vallance, English Church Screens (1936).

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"screen." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/screen

"screen." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/screen

screen

screen.
1. Partition of timber, stone, or metal, not part of the main structure of a church, to separate the nave from the choir (called variously chancel-, choir-, Rood-screen, or pulpitum), nave from choir-or chancel-aisle (called parclose screen), or to define a chantry-or mortuary-chapel, etc.

2. Any other such screen, as in a medieval hall, defining the screens passage.

3. Open colonnade or arcade around a court, e.g. in a cloister.

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"screen." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen

"screen." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen

screen

screen contrivance to ward off heat, wind, light, etc.; partition in a building XV; (fig.) XVI; sifting apparatus XVI. Aphetic — ONF. escren, var. of escran (mod. écran), of Gmc. orig. (cf. OHG. skrank bar, barrier, fence).
Hence vb. shelter, shield XV; sift XVII.

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"screen." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-3

"screen." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-3

Screen

Screen

a line or belt of trees; the cinema and its films, collectively, 1928; a small body of troops detached to cover the movements of other soldiers.

Examples : screen of oak and sycamore trees, 1894; of privet, beech, holly and yew, 1882; of troops, 1894.

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"Screen." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Screen." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-0

"Screen." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-0

screen

screen
1. The surface of a cathode-ray tube or other display device on which information can be displayed.

2. To select and display information in response to an instruction or an inquiry.

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"screen." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen

"screen." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen

screen

screenAberdeen, Amin, aquamarine, baleen, bean, been, beguine, Benin, between, canteen, careen, Claudine, clean, contravene, convene, cuisine, dean, Dene, e'en, eighteen, fascine, fedayeen, fifteen, figurine, foreseen, fourteen, Francine, gean, gene, glean, gombeen, green, Greene, Halloween, intervene, Janine, Jean, Jeannine, Jolene, Kean, keen, Keene, Ladin, langoustine, latrine, lean, limousine, machine, Maclean, magazine, Malines, margarine, marine, Mascarene, Massine, Maxine, mean, Medellín, mesne, mien, Moline, moreen, mujahedin, Nadine, nankeen, Nazarene, Nene, nineteen, nougatine, obscene, palanquin, peen, poteen, preen, quean, queen, Rabin, Racine, ramin, ravine, routine, Sabine, saltine, sardine, sarin, sateen, scene, screen, seen, serene, seventeen, shagreen, shebeen, sheen, sixteen, spleen, spring-clean, squireen, Steen, submarine, supervene, tambourine, tangerine, teen, terrine, thirteen, transmarine, treen, tureen, Tyrrhene, ultramarine, umpteen, velveteen, wean, ween, Wheen, yean •soybean • buckbean

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"screen." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"screen." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-1

"screen." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/screen-1