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flamboyant style

flamboyant style, the final development in French Gothic architecture that reached its height in the 15th cent. It is characterized chiefly by ornate tracery forms that, by their suggestion of flames, gave the style its name. Although these free-flowing patterns in lines of double curvature originated in the English Decorated Gothic (early 14th cent.), the French adopted them as the basis of a lavish style quite different from the English original. Flamboyant works exhibit pronounced freedom and exuberance, created by high, attenuated proportions, accumulated and elaborate traceries, and many crockets, pinnacles, and canopied niches. It is believed that the style first appeared in the west facade of the cathedral at Rouen (1370); its culmination is in the Church of St. Maclou, Rouen (1437–50). Other conspicuous examples are the Palais de Justice at Rouen, begun 1482; the west chapels of Amiens Cathedral; the northern spire of Chartres; and the south transept of the cathedral at Beauvais.

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"flamboyant style." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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flamboyant

flam·boy·ant1 / flamˈboiənt/ • adj. 1. (of a person or their behavior) tending to attract attention because of their exuberance, confidence, and stylishness: a flamboyant display of aerobatics she is outgoing and flamboyant, continuously talking and joking. ∎  (esp. of clothing) noticeable because brightly colored, highly patterned, or unusual in style. 2. Archit. of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flamelike tracery and ornate decoration. DERIVATIVES: flam·boy·ance n. flam·boy·an·cy / -ˈboiənsē/ n. flam·boy·ant·ly adv. flam·boy·ant2 • n. another term for royal poinciana (see poinciana).

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"flamboyant." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flamboyant." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flamboyant-1

"flamboyant." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flamboyant-1

Flamboyant

Flamboyant. Late style of Continental Gothic (c.1375–mid-C16) that evolved from Second Pointed Curvilinear work, especially the flowing forms of the tracery: it gets its name from the flame-like shapes bounded by the curved bars. In France its most outstanding manifestations were at the west porch of St-Maclou, Rouen (c.1500–14), and the west front of Troyes Cathedral (early C16) by Chambiges. Flamboyant tracery occurs elsewhere, including the British Isles (e.g. west window of York Minster).

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"Flamboyant." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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flamboyant style

flamboyant style Final phase of French Gothic architecture (14th–16th century). The name comes from the flame-like forms of the elaborate tracery used in cathedrals, as on the west façade of Rouen Cathedral (1370). The English Decorated style is a close equivalent.

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"flamboyant style." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flamboyant style." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/flamboyant-style

"flamboyant style." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/flamboyant-style

flamboyant

flamboyant (orig. archit.) characterized by waved flame-like forms; flamingly coloured. XIX. — F., prp. of flamboyer, f. flambe; see prec.

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"flamboyant." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"flamboyant." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flamboyant-2

"flamboyant." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flamboyant-2

flamboyant

flamboyant of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flamelike tracery and ornate decoration.

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"flamboyant." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"flamboyant." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/flamboyant

flamboyant

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"flamboyant." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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