Skip to main content

Halsbury, Hardinge Gifford, 1st earl of

Halsbury, Hardinge Gifford, 1st earl of (1823–1921). Conservative lawyer. Son of the editor of the Conservative Standard newspaper, Gifford was trained up to both the law and party politics. With an early reputation for relentless determination and formidable memory as a barrister, he was solicitor-general under Disraeli in 1875 even before he had become an MP. He was prominent in the Conservative harassment of Bradlaugh. Lord chancellor in all Conservative or Unionist governments from 1885 to 1905—seventeen years in all— Halsbury made many political appointments to the judicial bench and intensified the sense of confrontation between the judiciary and trade unionism. Few holders of his office have been so partisan. A hard-liner in opposition, he was one of the ‘die-hard’ peers who fought to the end to prevent the 1911 Parliament Bill removing the Lords' absolute veto. A productive legal reformer, Halsbury oversaw the production of the digest of The Laws of England (1905–16) which bears his name.

Bruce Coleman

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Halsbury, Hardinge Gifford, 1st earl of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Halsbury, Hardinge Gifford, 1st earl of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/halsbury-hardinge-gifford-1st-earl

"Halsbury, Hardinge Gifford, 1st earl of." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved November 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/halsbury-hardinge-gifford-1st-earl

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.