Skip to main content

Hailsham, Quintin Hogg, 2nd Baron

Hailsham, Quintin Hogg, 2nd Baron (1907–2001). Conservative politician and lawyer. Hogg entered Parliament at the Oxford by-election of 1938, a supporter of appeasement. He turned against Chamberlain before the latter's fall in 1940. Hogg rose to prominence in the Tory Reform Group, seeking to commit the party to a vigorous policy of social reform. Elevated to the Lords in 1950 on his father's death, he anticipated a career as a barrister. But Hailsham was recalled to government by Eden and enjoyed high office under Macmillan, including a successful period as party chairman. He renounced his peerage in 1963 to contest—unsuccessfully—the party leadership, returning to the Commons. He anticipated becoming home secretary under Heath in 1970 but, ennobled with a life peerage, served instead as lord chancellor, as his father had done. Hailsham showed his adaptability by retaining frontbench status under Margaret Thatcher, becoming lord chancellor again in 1979. By the time he retired in 1987, he was the longest-serving cabinet minister since the war.

David Dutton

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Hailsham, Quintin Hogg, 2nd Baron." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Hailsham, Quintin Hogg, 2nd Baron." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/hailsham-quintin-hogg-2nd-baron

"Hailsham, Quintin Hogg, 2nd Baron." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/hailsham-quintin-hogg-2nd-baron

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.